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  1. Hi All, For the last few months I've been experimenting with decals. With my HP laser printer I've been printing my own iron-rich decals and getting results I'm really happy with (picture below). The process is pretty straightforward, and so long as the ^6 glaze I'm putting decals on top of doesn't change with the additional firing, the results are predictable and aesthetically where I want them to be. But I'm working in only one color. As mentioned in other decal-focused posts, a ceramic printer that can print full color decals costs a few grand. And while there are commercial services available for printing decals, I'm more of a DIY kind of guy. So I'd like to start screenprinting my own decals using gold overglaze, cobalt, etc, and I'm curious if anyone can help shed some light on this process. I have a background in screenprinting, so I'm very comfortable withe the physical steps of the process. What I'm wondering about are the following: - The decal paper needs to be submerged in water to get the backing paper to release. Is there a substance I should mix in with my overglaze/cobalt oxide wash to make it so the image wont wash off the paper? - Should I be spraying a fixer over the images instead of/in addition to mixing a fixing agent into my "ink"? - Should the decals be applied face-down? The iron decals can be applied right-side-up, but I have a suspicion that printing things backward and applying the paper with the "ink" in direct contact with the ware will be more effective. - Any ratios, recipes, tricks or tips will be appreciated. Thanks, Chris
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