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Found 4 results

  1. Actually what she said was;"Your mugs are TOO BIG.'She said it about three times. She said;"You can't even see the bottom of them." I ignored her. The mugs were walking off the shelves. People requested a bigger size mug. They are one pound. A regular size, not too huge. Why do people come into my studio and feel that it is O.K. to complain, to criticize, to find fault? Why didn't she say;"Your eyes are too blue? Or your hair is too wavy?" I am not going to change my work for her. Why say anything if you can't be positive? Do you have a sales experience where the person felt it was O.K to find fault? Let's here your stories. Try to err on the positive side if possible. TJR.
  2. So, I am standing in the middle of my studio in the middle of our big Mother's Day open artists studio walk. There are 9 professional artists, and we open up our studios to people who walk the neighbourhood, looking at art. It is a two day sale, and happens again in November. The great thing is that I don't have to move my work, and people can see an artist in his/her natural environment. Anyway, these two guys are standing there looking at me. They are about 26. Tall, thin, good looking. Both wearing woolen hats which we call touques in Canada. They looked strangely familiar. Luckily, they introduced themselves by name. I knew them right away. I had taught both of them art over 8 years ago. G. was now an architecture student. I remember him being an amazing drawer. He was the student council president and did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING! I gave him a reference. We laughed at that. The other young man was sporting a full beard. I couldn't grow a beard like that until I was in my 40's. I remembered luckily, that the second student, had a father who died while he was still in high school. He works as a pressman, or a printer. Both had traveled, looked at art, had fun before settling down. They had heard about the sale and wanted to see me. Apparently I was their favourite teacher in high school. Even though they weren't the most serious students, they turned out great. They congratulated me on winning the Canadian high school art teacher of the year award in 2012.They said that it was a long time coming. I said that I hadn't done much lately and we all laughed. It was a great time. Have you influenced anyone, or changed a young person's life, for the good? Let's hear about it. TJR.
  3. So, I bought the "Square", which attaches to your cell phone, with the idea that having the ability to take credit cards would increase my sales.I don't own a cel phone, so I had to borrow my wife's. We tried it out the week before, and it worked great. We had to take her phone out of the rubber case to make a solid connection. When offered the option of credit card use, people said;"What would it cost you ?" My response was 2.6%. They all declined to use it. One woman even wrote me an IOU for $30.00, rather than use the Square. Do you have any experience with using credit cards? Would this be an option for you? This was a two day open studio sale involving eight other artists in a group where I live.Each artist was in their own studio and customers walked or drove to the various houses/studios. One other potter has the credit card machine that you swipe, with paper receipts. Tom.
  4. How do you educate your customers about your work. Do you teach him some simple tricks to use when looking at ware? Long story short, many years ago I had a customer at my home buying several Communion sets. I had set out 25 sets for him to choose from, and we did some changing around of chalices with the plates to match what he saw in the way of pairs. We were having a discussion of why I paired up chalices and patens, and decoration details etc. when he noticed a paten setting by itself. I had a Paten(plate) set aside that had a beautiful finish with decoration that had come out quite well. He wanted to know why I was not including it in the selection as he thought it was beautiful. I told him it was a reject, and I was going to use it around the house. He pushed the issue, so I held up the plate with fingers supporting it underneath, rapped it with a wooden dowel. I then did the same with one of the ones in the sale. I asked if he noticed a difference, and after an explanation of cracks, and overtones in sound got him to listen closely again. He could then hear the second sound. I then showed him where the crack was, and he said he would have never seen it unless I had pointed it out. I told him, that it may last years, or a few days, but that the crack was a flaw and I could not sell it. Before packing up the 20 sets purchased, he was happy to check each plate and each chalice to see if he could find a crack I had missed-nada.
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