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Found 3 results

  1. Hi - I was doing a glaze fire to cone 5 last night, and due to a dumb mistake on my part, the kiln shut off an hour too early. My question is this: can I save these pots by refiring them to the correct temperature? Can I do this without reglazing them? Is it even worth it? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
  2. I'm not sure why some cone 6 glazes change color rather drastically when refired to a lower temperature, but maybe someone can explain. Specifically, Coyote Ice Blue glaze fired to cone 6 turned out the usual beautiful multi-hued blue, brownish at the breaks. Then I decided to put some low fire clear glaze on the bottom and refired the piece at cone 06. The result was an awful, mottled green and brown camouflage-like color. Yeechhh!! So I refired back up to cone 6 again hoping to recover the blues. The piece now looks much better - the greens are gone - but the subtler blues are also gone and there is more and deeper brown. As it happens, I did the same thing to several other pieces with different commercial glazes on them. All of them suffered significant color degradation after the 06 low fire, and recovered only a portion of their original color in the second cone 6 fire. With one exception: a bowl with a combination of Amaco Textured Turquoise and Amaco Iron Lustre looked pretty bad after the low fire but almost completely recovered its original color after being refired to cone 6. I thought it was safe to refire pieces at a lower temperature, but I am obviously mistaken. Any insights on this phenomenon would be appreciated.
  3. I use Southern Ice porcelain, bisque fired then sanded then fired to cone 9 and sanded again, I don't use glazes. I have started making complex neriage coloured work, using the same clay body. I sometimes develop fine cracks that can successfully be patched and refired to cone 9 but the result is an all over tiny bloating of the surface. I have read a lot about bloating and the possibility it is due to over firing but don't really know what that means. I have twice fired thinner, slip cast work (from the same clay) without developing this problem. Could it mean I need to slow down the firing at one or more stages?

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