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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

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  1. This week is ad interesting question that I posted into the question bank recently. However it is not mine, as Lou sent it to me in a PM when the forum ICAN network was locked. So he asks Aside from a nearby sign, hangtag, or stuck-on label, how do you determine whether a specific pot was handmade or not? ( or substitute for "handmade": wood fired, soda fired, Raku, ...) I will rephrase his question to read: When looking at pottery, how do your determine or identify whether the pot was handmade, and what type of construction and firing was used to create it? I have often had problems identifying pottery that is thrown or slab, poured or otherwise. I find that often I feel the inside of the form to see if there are throwing ridges, or look at the bottom to see how the trimming was done, but often get thrown off. My main way of finding a "tell" is to talk to the potter if he is available, or the clerk if in a gallery. With a matter of a few questions, discussions of firing temperature, differences in slab rollers, and wheels, throwing speeds, clay weights. . . . . . all of my questions are answered with certainty. Some of them do leave me lacking as the persons level of expertise does not match that of the pot, this when talking to the potter. Sometimes I have to further research the potter, to understand more of what I would wish to know, especially when my original queries were with a clerk, not the potter. I used to have high respect for a local potter and professor in our area. This gentleman did very large. . 24-36" platters in redware, slip decorated in traditional decoration. I always admired his ability to throw these platters with throwing marks and nice transparent glazes, even though I was not into redware. We had discussed the ability to center and throw larger amounts of clay for the platters, and he always would carry a good conversation. Later on in my career, I attended a workshop where he demonstrated making the large platters. He placed a large plaster form on the wheel using bat pins, rolled out a large slab using a slab roller, and then proceeded to fit the slab to the form, using his fingers to run throwing marks into the slab and to firm the shape up to the form. Threw a foot ring on the bottom, and then set it aside to stiffen up while he proceeded to demonstrate slip trail design using a template for division marks. I guess I am a purist, and felt I had been deceived. In the end, looking at a piece How do you really identify it? best, Pres
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