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Found 110 results

  1. Looking for a good used electric pottery wheel.
  2. Ceramic workshop with textural tile maker and sculptor, Rhoda Kahler. Stamp it, sculpt it, carve it, keep it decorative or make it functional! July 25 & 26th, 10am - 4pm Opportunity to make either two tiles or one tile and one sculpture included in the price. (Tile size approximately: 10”x10”) Lunch will be served both days during the class, this is included in the price. Students do not have to bring any materials but are welcome to bring their own texture materials and/or sketchbook/notebook if they’d like. This class is great for students that have worked with clay before but beginners are welcome! Students do have the option to make the second class focused on tiles if they prefer. Students that create more than the two items described above, can purchase additional tickets at the front desk. $225/$200 Members Space is limited, registration deadline: July 17th, 2019 Click Here to Register Class will be located at: View 3272 St. Rt. 28 Old Forge, NY 13420 www.ViewArts.org 315-369-6411 Rhoda Kahler’s Biography Rhoda Kahler is a ceramic artist with a studio in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Her work has been featured internationally, nationally, and regionally in magazines, newspapers and television, including on the Home and Garden Television network (HGTV) and Crave Magazine, among many others. In addition to exhibiting in galleries, Kahler’s large scale handmade tile murals and sculptures appear in public and private collections. Notable commissions include the Delaware Art Museum, West Chester University and the Philadelphia Environmental Film Festival. Kahler conducts workshops nationally and participates in a wide range of Artist Residencies, some of which include the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Inglis House. Kahler is an adjunct faculty member at West Chester University, where she received her bachelor of fine art degree in 1995. Drawing from nature, much of Kahler’s art bends toward the organic, making use of abstraction and assemblage. There is a tactile intimacy that is translated through the mud between her fingers to her pieces that beg to be touched. Kahler is captivated by surface and in a never ending exploration of the vast textures that can be achieved through clay. The majority of Kahler’s work is cone 6 oxidation however, pit firing techniques and photo lithography were used for the 24/7 Project.
  3. Hello all, Looking for firing schedules. I have a small manual electric kiln with a kiln sitter and wondering if anyone has a simple, clear firing schedule they follow and could share? I am a beginner trying to learn how to fire for Cone 04 Bisque and then another schedule for Cone 6 Glaze Fire. I am using buff stoneware. Any firing tips appreciated! Thanks so much, Natalie
  4. Hello I was hoping for any help on the trimming of pinch pots on the wheel, I met another Potter at my local studio who does this and she offered to show me but we keep missing each other. Do any of you know how to do this and what kind of specific equipment or tool do I need? A plaster or bisque slump mould? What kind of bat system do you need?
  5. Hello, I just unloaded a kiln load and noticed a substantial amount of pinging. My kiln is pretty much brand new (firing #3) and it reached cone 6. The pots are not crazed and hold water perfectly. The glaze seems to "fit" the clay and I see no glaze peeling. I have used both clay and glaze together before with no issues. I cracked the kiln around 300 F and opened it at 250 F. Hopefully, I can get an explanation.
  6. Hello everyone, I am writing this post due to hope of meeting with someone who may help me to build a downdraft gas fired kiln. I have the book of Frederick Olsen's Kiln Book and in my opinion it has enough information to design a kiln but it may take a lot of time when I start doing that. I only start making ceramics and will be very appreciated ıf I can find someone to give me a hand.. That's why I just want to ask people on here and maybe somebody would like to share a kiln plan (preferentially 1m3) which had been tested before. Thank you in advance!
  7. Maria Longworth Storer: 1849-1932 * founded The Cincinnati May Festival in 1871, which continues today. The first woman in US history to start an annual music festival. * one of the first women to exhibit their pottery at the first US held World Fair in 1876. * founded the Rookwood Pottery in 1879 with fellow female artist Mary Louise McLaughlin. * one of the first American potters to incorporate Japanese cultural art into their work. Mary Louise McLaughlin 1847-1939 *co-founder of the Rookwood Pottery in 1879 * in 1876, she became the first US potter to use the "underglaze" technique in pottery. She actually developed the technique that was a closely guarded secret of the Haviland Pottery in Europe. * wrote one of the first books on China Painting: China Painting: A Practical Manual for the Use of Amateurs in the Decoration of Hard Porcelain). * in 1880 she wrote the first book on "underglazing": Pottery Decoration under the Glaze * in the 1890's, she began producing porcelain fired pieces in her backyard: making her the first studio potter in the United States. The work of both of these women can be found at the Cincinnati Art Museum. Feel free to add your favorite artist/potter from our history, but please use the format shown. Nerd
  8. Hello, Short video hand building a small vase. There will be 3 parts. Part 1 Body Part 2 lid building and Part 3 sanding and finishing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1VQsYSDfCo
  9. Hi, so I am new at this and asking for help. I had fired my clay, and painted it (with regular paint, ceramics friendly) and then put a glaze over top. The glaze said it could be used over paint and that it should be clear after firing. After firing the glazed pieces, it seems that the paint has been stripped off and the glaze never went clear. Did I do something wrong? My kiln is a cone 8, bought barely used. I followed the instructions on the side and the internet: Cook on low for 1 hr., medium for 2 hrs., and (after looking it up) another hour on low. Also, is there any way I can fix the pieces? They were gifts and took me a while to make them, but I know they're likely ruined. I appreciate any advice and help.
  10. I need to find the best All-In-One clay for cone 5, great for both hand building and wheel throwing I know. That's a tall order. But I can dream. I have a pug mill and don't want 2 bodies. Problem: I have too many problems with my gas kiln for cone 06 anymore. I'm DONE. I am moving to cone 5. Criteria / Factors: I'm in Southern California I teach 180 high school students grades 9-12, all levels of art skills, so it has to take punishment Not too sandy on the wheel, not too smooth or squishy for hand building Not too dense so it is so top-heavy when trimming I'm willing to pug the new clay to soften it for throwing, if it is stiff and great for hand building, or visa versa Doesn't stain clothes or the tables, rolling pins, or make a mess everywhere Is not pure white (students can't see where they missed glazing spots when using light color glazes - painting) Good leather hard, doesn't soften up too easily when re-wetting to score things together Doesn't take every indentation to the surface of pieces, temperamentalD Centers on the wheel fairly easily, especially for teen girls with tiny hands Can take a good amount of water from beginners Pulling walls, it is strong, doesn't warp or sag easily Won't dry out too quickly in hands while hand building Doesn't bend or warp easily when removing from the wheel Not so soft that it caves when cutting and sliding off the wheel Doesn't make teens hate the class because it stains clothes or gets everywhere and of course, takes glazes well and can handle a little fluctuation in gas environments Cone 5 clays I've Tried: Laguna - Dover White: Nice clay, but pure white. easy to center, but A little soft when hand building Laguna - Plain (Buff): Nice light tan color, easy center and to rehydrate if repairing, but a bit too squishy and shows every dent Laguna - Moroccan Sand: I love this clay, doesn't leave residue - color, but a bit dense to center. It is really dark grayish brown, if they only could lighten it Laguna - Buff with Sand: Nice tan color, but WAY too sandy for students on the wheel Laguna - Greystone: Too dense and top heavy for small pieces, hard to center, but really takes a beating with water, warps when thin due to density of surrounding clay Laguna - Speckled Buff: A bit dark in color, has iron so it gets read everywhere, could stain (think girls with pure white vans) Laguna - LB-6: hmmm, can't remember, but nixed it very soon after Laguna - Sante Fe: OMG - red EVERYWHERE, like a crime scene Aardvark Clay - SBF - Too dark tan - a bit sticky for students Aardvark Clay -Arctic White: Too white Opinions???? Go!!!
  11. Hello everyone, Lately I've been keen on getting started on pottery. I guess the creative aspect of it is what attracted me to the concept in the first place, and that I can practically turn it into any piece of art I wish! I haven't begun any practical experience or even laid my hands on clay as of yet, just reading and watching beginner videos every now and then. I do have a local pottery-making studio that offers packaged sessions and they are quite pricy. I'm wondering about turning it into a hobby and I hope I end up liking it when I try it. I am also glad to find this forum that gathers a community of pottery makers, I could learn a thing or two and discover some advice. Do you guys have any tips and insights, or stories on how you got started? Is it a difficult hobby to master? What's required of anyone getting into the pottery business? What are the best steps to take when you want to begin and continue along the right path? And in your opinion, whats the best clay to use and technique when designing? Thanks! Looking forward to your helpful comments.
  12. Hello! My name is Rebekah and I'm currently working on a wonderful project that cover's the 'Arts and Crafts Movement' from the late 19th - early 20th century for BBC. At present we're looking to source an authentic Victorian kick wheel from this time period or ideally an original kick wheel to feature in our Arts doc. I am an artist myself however I thought it wiser to approach my fellow creatives in the ceramic community with this hoping that somebody out there is able to advise on the best way to approach the search. Any help would be greatly appreciated, my contact details are as follows: Production company : Lion TV E: rebekah.finnigan@liontv.co.uk T: 0141 331 4996 Best, Rebekah
  13. From the album: Nir and Zanetta Pottery

    © Nir & Zaneta

  14. From the album: Nir and Zanetta Pottery

    © Nir and Zaneta

  15. I had an interesting idea today and that was to sprinkle sand on my freshly thrown pieces to add some interesting designs. My teacher is going to try in the older kiln since it doesn't matter as much if it does something bad. However that kiln can only get as high as cone 6. I was wondering though if maybe the sand will melt possibly. I don't have any specific details about the sand except that its high in silica. Has anyone had any experience with this yet? Any suggestion would be appreciated.
  16. Min recently asked the following question, and it runs differently than most of the ones asked in the pool. It has also been bumped by LeeU in a post that she like Min's question. . . so: Do you make feminine, masculine or gender neutral work and is it a conscious decision? I have never thought about masculinity or femininity of any work. Looking over my work, I believe it is all over the gender situation. I have biases that I will admit when throwing work: I really do not like to see a flat spot in any curve, I consider the diameter of bottoms in proportion to height as not wanting a piece to be visually too bottom heavy or too spindly because of a narrow base to a tall form, I like shoulder accents in "S" shaped curves to slow the motion to the neck or rim, I love to texture the piece before shaping(something that has only happened within the last two years, and I have a tendency to follow the "Golden Mean" when throwing, handbuilding or combining forms. In much of this I do not pre sketch unless I am constructing a form either of slab, thrown or combined pieces. Most of my work is completed visually within the throwing and trimming. I throw lots of pieces of the same genre (mug, bowl, honey pot etc) at a time, breaking off in different directions in the form as I see something I particularly like at the time, then head in another direction. You could look at my gallery, or blog to see if you find a gender in my pieces, I really don't know as I have one. best, Pres
  17. Tea Bowls: Form Function & Beauty www.pocosinarts.org Explore the processes and aesthetics of making winter and summer tea bowls for Tea Ceremony. Learn about the architecture of tea bowls, the art of trimming tea bowl feet including: aesthetics, proportions, preparing clay bodies, wheel, hand forming and carving methods, throwing off the mound to achieve fluid tea bowl forms. ALL LEVELS some clay experience handy Session runs October 4 – 7, 2018 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily, open studio hours on select days. $375 tuition + $35 registration fee Artist Bio: KRISTIN MULLER is a studio artist who began her study of Chawan making with Peter Callas and Takao Okazaki in 1994. She purchased Okazaki’s studio and anagama kiln in 2000 and completed an MFA thesis focused on Tea Bowl forming and firing techniques in 2014. Kristin is also the Executive Director of Peters Valley School of Craft, adjunct faculty at Hood College, author of The Potter’s Studio Handbook: A Guide to Hand Built and Wheel-Thrown Ceramics and co-author of Making Good: An Inspirational Guide to Being an Artist Craftsman. www.Kristinmuller.com $410
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