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Found 5 results

  1. bisquekilnload.jpg

    From the album Beads Pendants Cabs Minis Low Fire Ceramics

    Very first batch of low fire clay pieces. All loaded onto a 5X5 inch kiln shelf. I have a Paragon SC2 kiln that I named Miss Piggy. I use it often to anneal steel rods for making stamps and I fire metal clay silver and bronze. This first bisque firing was thrilling! 15 hours, very conservative ramp rate. Like the first time trying to dress a newborn, I was being super careful.

    © yorkavenuestudio.com

  2. bisquekilnload.jpg

    From the album Beads Pendants Cabs Minis Low Fire Ceramics

    Very first batch of low fire clay pieces. All loaded onto a 5X5 inch kiln shelf. I have a Paragon SC2 kiln that I named Miss Piggy. I use it often to anneal steel rods for making stamps and I fire metal clay silver and bronze. This first bisque firing was thrilling! 15 hours, very conservative ramp rate. Like the first time trying to dress a newborn, I was being super careful.

    © yorkavenuestudio.com

  3. Help needed: The clay I'm forming by hand gets cracky and splits so fast that even a simple form isn't finished unless I'm rushing. Please suggest ideas for longer, less rushed forming time. I'm using low fire clay, Standard White 105 brand new from the box and pinching and forming animals and small pendants and beads. I can roll out a snake and then it's too dry. That fast. I can roll a bead and pinch a couple times, then cracks start if I continue. Super dry hands maybe? My guess is to use a mist spray, cover, wait, work a few minutes, mist, cover, wait...I do have a lot of patience! Thank you! Kathy
  4. Hello! I'm new to the community, and I've been trying to find information throughout the other threads, but haven't had too much luck... I've been working with Sculpey polymer clays and glazes to make little charms and figurines, but have been wanting to move on to heavier clays and their beautiful glazes.I particularly love the look of porcelain, but I am a complete newbie, and don't know where to begin. I live in Seattle, so I am hoping to check out Seattle Potter Supply sometime this week, but I'd love to have an idea of what to get before I go. Mostly, I will probably stick to making charms, ring holders, and bracelets at first, but I've always loved the idea of making my own dinnerware. I will be hand building everything, and most of the charms I make are fairly tiny (1" or smaller). The ring holders and bracelets would obviously be bigger, but probably nothing over 4", and everything should be less than 1/2" in thickness. I am wondering if there is any clay I should start with that could achieve a look similar to porcelain, or if I should try to jump into porcelain first. I am aware polymer clay has incredibly different properties, and that porcelain is notorious for being difficult to work with (cracking, shrinkage, slumping, etc). I am hoping that since the pieces I'd be making will be small and not too complex in form (I am fairly quick at forming them now), that it shouldn't pose too much of a problem. Grolleg, Kutani, Dove, Awaji, and Crystal White Porcelains were some of the ones I was looking at that had descriptions that seemed to match my needs. But I also saw Alpine White, which is a stoneware, and wondered if that also might be what I am looking for. I an image (the unicorn) of what I'd hope my work will eventually similarly translate to in ceramics. Thank you!
  5. Beads and pendants

    From the album Work in Progress

    An assortment of handmade beads with high-fire wire bails.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade, all rights reserved

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