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Found 6 results

  1. Burnish Gold Luster Mug

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    This cup is in the invitational exhibition "I'll Drink To That" at the Eclipse Mill Gallery in North Adams, MA until August 27th, 2017. Handbuilt, woodfired, American Shino, overglaze enamel, gold luster.

    © 2017 - John Baymore - all rights reserved

  2. Flower Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Wood fired flower vase with tenmoku glaze, applied feldspar, and red overglaze enamels. This is sitting in the tokonoma (art alcove) in our newly renovated (2018-17) kitchen.

    © 2017 John Baymore -all rights reserved

  3. hi experts! Please help! One of my customers just sent me a picture of the plate that I hand-painted for them. They said they never used the dishwasher or microwave and were very gentle with it when hand washing and only used it for cold desserts. Please see the attached pictures. The cracking that you are seeing is on a plain rim dinner plate from bisque imports with only the Duncan Pure Brilliance clear overglaze on it. Why would this have happened? I will say that I had not sieved my dipping glaze in several months and when I did it was seriously clumpy and the sieve got clogged really quickly. Could that have been the reason? We are going to do some testing on some glazed plates since we sieved it, but if you guys have any other ideas, please help!!!
  4. Hi all, this forum has been a treasure trove of information while I was learning and exploring techniques, I hope you can help me with a specific question. I like the look of unglazed clay when it has been fired at ^10. Red clays, black clays, off white clays… I like to play with the contrast of glazed and unglazed fired clay. One thing I would like to try, is to give color to the unglazed areas of my work, sort of like the pitcher pic I attached below. This is not exactly what I'm going for, though, but close. Here I assume the pattern on the unglazed clay is iron oxide applied along with the glaze and high-fired at the same time. Perhaps the tumblers I attached are like a better example of what I'm talking about, you can see she dipped the rim in white glaze and painted the rest with bright stripes, I'm puzzled as to how/what steps/what with. What I'd like to do is work in two steps. First I'd glaze the pot & fire it, and then I'd apply vivid colors to the unglazed parts, leaving the glazed part alone, and fire the ware again, at a lower temperature (lower^ is how I understand I will get the brightest colors). So my question is : What kind of color (overglaze/underglaze/stains..) would a) adhere to mature unglazed stoneware, and become permanent during firing ? This is not for the interior of dinnerware, but possibly destined to items that would get handled a lot. I guess another question would be : Am I approaching this wrong and should I consider another process? Thank you for any insight you may have on this, D. The photos are of work by Ako Castuera and Shino Takeda
  5. Overglaze Pens

    Has anyone used the overglaze pens? Just wondering how they look. If they are easy to use... I am wanting to fill in small grooves where I cut into the clay to define the petroglyph I am carving into the clay. Since several colors are involved I am wanting to outline with a solid color. Thinking this pen might do the trick. Or perhaps someone has a better idea. Thank you!! I will have fired my final to a ^5. Linda
  6. I recently started using duncan premium gold luster on some of my pieces. I'm finding that there is confusing information about the fumes, both before and during firing, and whether or not it is toxic to breathe. According to dogwoodceramics.com "Health & Safety 1. Overglazes contain solvents and should be used in a well-ventilated area. Those susceptible to odors (such as pregnant women) should be especially careful to work only in areas with an adequate ventilation system. During firing, odors are not dangerous but can be offensive. These odors quickly leave the area; however, you should not work in the kiln area during firing. 2. Duncan Overglazes can be used on surfaces that come into contact with food and drink. Care must be taken to avoid hard scrubbing when washing overglazed ware, because of the possibility of scraping off the thin layer of metal or luster. Treat your overglazed pieces as you would fine china. Although overglazed ware will take repeated washings in a dishwasher, the overglaze will eventually wear away. 3. Caution. Do not place pieces with metallic overglazes into a microwave oven. As with any metallic surface, they could cause sparks." ============================= I apply outside, and though the smell is apparent, it is not overbearing..keep in mind I'm only accenting with the gold. Should I be wearing a mask while applying? What about during firing? I only go outside to turn the kiln up so I'm in contact with the fumes 99.9% of the time. So what are your thoughts? I've now read that the fumes are VERY dangerous and that the fumes are not dangerous. Will like to hear your thoughts on this. Thanks, Casi
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