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Found 28 results

  1. "I'll Drink to That" A National Exhibition of Drinking Vessels This show opens with a reception for the artists on Friday, August 4, from 6 to 8 pm. It remains on view, Thursday to Sunday, from 10 am through 5pm, through August 27. The premise of the special exhibition is to underscore the aesthetics and diversity of high end ceramic artists creating functional but exquisite objects. More than twenty-five ceramic artists from as far away as Oregon and Arizona as well as local and regional potters will exhibit. Ceremonial tea bowls, wine cups, whisky cups, juice cups, steins, chowder mugs and more will be available for purchase. A variety of clays, techniques, glazes and firing processes will be represented. During the busy summer season there is a lot of tourism in the community drawn by proximity to MASS MoCA, The Clark Art Institute, Williams College Museum of Art and the Berkshire Artists Museum. Eclipse Mill Gallery 243 Union St. North Adams, MA 01247
  2. Tennis Net Mugs - Name Imprinted

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  3. House on the House on the... Image Transfers

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  4. Coffee cups

    From the album Fun Fun Fun

    © �Pottery by Penny

  5. Actually what she said was;"Your mugs are TOO BIG.'She said it about three times. She said;"You can't even see the bottom of them." I ignored her. The mugs were walking off the shelves. People requested a bigger size mug. They are one pound. A regular size, not too huge. Why do people come into my studio and feel that it is O.K. to complain, to criticize, to find fault? Why didn't she say;"Your eyes are too blue? Or your hair is too wavy?" I am not going to change my work for her. Why say anything if you can't be positive? Do you have a sales experience where the person felt it was O.K to find fault? Let's here your stories. Try to err on the positive side if possible. TJR.
  6. Hello, I am new to ceramics. I have made coil and slab pieces during high school art class, but that's it. I think I know the basics of making pieces, but I'm not sure how the whole firing process goes. I have found a used Skutt kiln for sale. Model LT-3K, three tier, new shut off tube assembly, inside 1/2 selves, on roll cart, and vents to outside for $700. Does this sound like a deal to anyone? What should I look out for when purchasing a used kiln? Also, I need all the start up tools. I think I would like to purchase a wheel to make cups, bowls, plates, mugs, and vases. Any thoughts? Thanks!
  7. Mugs

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Two woodfired American style mugs. Local granite, local clay and wood ash glaze. Both were sold at a solo exhibition held in Japan in 2011.

    © copyright John Baymore - all rights reserved

  8. Tennis Net Mugs

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  9. Tennis Net Mugs

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  10. I realize that mugs without handles are cups. However, I love mugs without handles like so many other people do. I have a small home studio, and I am testing my talent. I made my husband a fabulous mug without a handle. He says it's too hot and burns his hands. I personally love to feel the heat in my hands. It soothes the pains of years of computing. I made my hot chocolate in a commercially made mug and held it without using the handle. It was very hot. That's why you put handles on mugs right? Am I being selfish not putting handles on my mugs? I give them away mostly, but intend to sell them in the future. I guess I could make mug koozies and upsell them. LOL What is your opinion of handles on mugs? How could you not love this mug? (see attached.)
  11. Hi all, Last month I did a little test of how 'efficiently' I throw/decorate a mug and today I posted the results and images on my blog, also copied below: Between 3-5 mins to wedge Between 13-15 mins to throw a mug 10 mins for turning 5 minutes to pull the handle and attach 5 minutes for cleanup Bisque firing 5 mins of sanding to make them 'closer' to my desired finish (i.e. smooth, no throwing lines) 15-30 minutes decorating - I tried out a sample pack of Japanese tissue transfers and added some trailed underglaze for definition 10 minutes for glazing and glaze cleanup (e.g. bottoms) Glaze firing In total? between 66-85 minutes per mug. Eeek! I should state upfront that I am new to ceramics so I don't look completely moronic So - what I am interested in understanding from everyone are some 'industry baselines' for making a mug - i.e. how long does it take you (understanding of course everyone's creation/decoration techniques are different and thus have different 'time investments')...?
  12. Il 570xN.810662171 4gfh

    From the album Mad About Pottery

    The mugs are made out of a beige clay I then coated the surface with a rustic green glaze and added a light touch to the rim with a light grey glaze.

    © Gittit Rad-El

  13. 034

    From the album Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Mugs, white ^6 stoneware, overall incising, colored transparent glaze, footed, pulled handle.
  14. 028

    From the album Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Autumn Leaf Mugs, dark stoneware ^6, sgraffito through underglazes, dotted accents, autumn leaf design, pulled handles, colorful.
  15. 032

    From the album Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Autumn Leaf Mugs, white ^6 stoneware, underglazes with a wax resist and blackline leaf design, dotted accents, footed, pulled handles.
  16. 029

    From the album Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Mugs, ^6 dark stoneware, sgraffito through underglazes, dotted accents, footed.
  17. Slip Trailing Session

    From the album Work in Progress

    Having a mad and intense slip trailing session. I'm making these mugs specially as gifts for my husband's coworkers.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  18. 25 lbs of throwing

    From the album Work in Progress

    To date this is the most I've ever thrown in one session. A full half box of clay and ohhh were my hands ever sore the next day.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  19. Getting a handle on it

    From the album High Fire

    These are some thick hand built plus pulled handles I am working on for my mugs.
  20. So, right after Christmas, I get a call asking me to make 60 mugs for a conference.It's a teachers conference starting today. They wanted to give two matching mugs for each speaker. I have dealt with this man over the years, and he is very reliable with payment. Here's the problem; we were all still in holiday mode. I had just gotten back from Cuba. Steve, my firing partner had just gotten back from Arizona. I did have about the right number of pots bisqued, but no way could we fill a 40 cubic ft. kiln in such a short turn around time. Three potters jumped on our wheels in an attempt to fill a kiln load in time to get this order out. I made 12 collanders-5lbs each with saucers, another run of mugs, medium bowls.We got another potter that we show with to bring pots. We got a student from the pottery co-op.We got that baby loaded. Then one burner would not light. Not ever. Call the plumber. We lost a day there. So he picked up the pots Monday evening, hot out of the kiln. He took 65 mugs,a jug, two plates,a big bowl,a Majolica jar I had lying around,two large mugs, and two beakers. I feel a bit violated, as my studio is now bereft of work. I did not get a chance to look at most of those pieces. Do you have a pottery sale horror story? This one actually turned out well. Let's hear yours. Tom.
  21. Leaves and berries mugs

    From the album Work in Progress

    I had drawn up this slip trailing design, then wanted to try it out on different shapes of mug to see which one I like best. The good news is, I really like the design. The bad news is, I still couldn't tell you which one I like better! The branch goes up from the bottom on one side of the handle and down from the top on the other side so no matter where you look at the mug you get a different view every time.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade, all rights reserved

  22. I used to fall into the affectation camp. Back in the day, if I could sell a mug for 6 bucks, I was pretty happy. I can throw pretty fast, and I'd throw the mug, undercut the foot slightly with a wooden knife, wire it off, and it was done, except for the handle. I'd wipe the edge with a sponge, and leave the wire marks. High volume was the key to making my ration of macaroni and cheese. But recently I got into throwing yunomis-- handle-less cups for tea and wine Most of the great potters whose yunomis I looked at used turned footrings, even if some of them were what I would call a little crude. I really liked the way these cups looked. I've always felt that a nicely turned footring was a prerequisite for an elegant bowl, but it never occurred to me before that they would work well with mugs. I tended to think stability was the big thing with mugs, so the wider the base, the better. In any case, I started looking at the yunomis I was throwing, and realized that some of the forms would work pretty well for mugs, too, with the addition of a handle. Lately I've been dividing my drinking vessel production into mugs and yunomis, both with turned foot rings. I really like them. Am I wrong to think that I have improved my forms? (I know, I know... each potter has to decide if a particular form demands a foot ring, but I apparently operate on a much more concrete form of esthetic judgement.) What are your thoughts?
  23. Every potter invariably has a cup or mug that just hasn’t sold. While it may be beautifully unique and stands out as a little different from the rest of your pieces, it just hasn’t found it’s home. I invite you to submit such a cup to Finding Forever 2014: Giving Voice to the Children of Foster Care. The event will take place in November and December 2014 in Greenfield, Massachusetts. Each cup or mug will represent a child currently in the foster care system. Each cup will be priced at $50. When sold $20 will go to the artist, $20 to the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange, and $10 will go towards the execution of the event. Please consider participating in this effort. Feel free to contact me should you have any additional questions about the event. All potters will be paid for their work when sold and there is no fee to participate. I'd love to have all of the fifty states represented! The prospectus is attached. More info is on our website, www.findingforeverexhibition.org Looking forward to hearing from folks! Pam Kinsmith FF prospectus2.pdf FF prospectus2.pdf
  24. Hello potter community! I'm trying to figure out how to attach a chunk of antler (sustainably sourced, of course) to the side of a stein to act as the handle. I've never done anything like this before, so I'm feeling really cluless as to the best way to go about it. Currently I have two lugs coming off the stein (top and bottom) and I was thinking of fastening the handle to the mug with leather strings that tied around the lugs and the antler. I'm making them for a medieval themed event. Is there a better/more professional way to go about this? I have been unsuccessful with trying to find tutorials online for this.. I've attached some photos of what I've got thus far.. they're still greenware so there's room to change things. Thanks in advance for your insight! Cheers! Erin Tiny Cat Pottery
  25. I have been making medallion mugs for a short time now. By a medallion mug, I mean: rolling out a thin slab, using a round cookie cutter to cut out a small blank medallion, stamping an image (usually a logo) into the blank medallion, attaching it to a leather hard mug. My mugs are OK, but I need to take them to the next level since I am getting some good sized orders. My main problem is getting a nice even edge around the medallion after I attach it. Any suggestions, or better yet, instruction videos out there? I have learned basically by trial and error (mostly error). I tried to post a photo, but this blog will not accept that large of an attachment. Thanks, Jim
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