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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

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  1. Week 32 The term “kiln atmosphere” is used to define the character of the heat distribution and the amount of _________________ inside the firing chamber during the course of a firing. sulfides carbon oxygen nitrogen Stained surface are __________________ . What you see before firing looks very much like the final product. This is important to those who don't like the transformation that glazes undergo during firing. Glossy in surface Hide clay/making imperfections WYSIWYG excellent sealants for functional ware ________________is crucial to the look of the glaze. Crystals seem to form at temperatures between 1800-1500F in a kiln that is ________________properly. Cooling Heating Water smoking Candling When firing opalescent glazes, a ________________firing recommended to achieve the opalescent character. It is recommended that opalescent glazes be applied in multiple coatings over a dark clay body. slow fast reduction incremental This weeks questions come from Electric Kiln Ceramics A Guide to Clays and Glazes, by Richard Zakin, c.2004 Third Edition, krause Publications. Note from Pres:The first edition of this book(which I have) was one of a tide of firsts entering into electric kiln ceramics and mid-fire clay bodies and glazes. Much of the information is available elsewhere, but Richard Zakin was much a pioneer here with his first edition. The 3rd edition is even better. Answers: 3. oxygen-The term “kiln atmosphere” is used to define the character of the heat distribution and the amount of oxygen inside the firing chamber during the course of a firing. The kiln atmosphere has a very strong influence on the look of the Work. The design of the electric kiln encourages very consistent heat conditions throughout the firing chamber and allows an ample flow of oxygen into the chamber at all times. 3. WYSIWYG-Stained surfaces have a number of significant advantages: They are very simple to use. These surfaces are WYSIWYG (What you see is What you get). What you see before firing looks very much like the final product. This is important to those who don’t like the transformation glazes undergo during firing. They Work well alone or in combination with slips and glazes. The color is excellent when fired in the electric kiln. Because they don’t cover or obscure the clay body, relief and engraved or impressed imagery is shown to good advantage. They are more consistent and reliable than most ceramic surfaces. 1. Cooling- Extend the cooling cycle of your firings. Cooling is crucial to the look of the glaze. Crystals seem to form most at temperatures between 1800F. To 1500F. In a kiln that is cooling slowly. Even at lower temperatures, however, color and texture respond to slow cooling. 2. Fast-Opalescent glazes have a high gloss and a strong metallic and opalescent character. A fast firing is recommended to encourage the opalescent effect. It is recommended that opalescent glazes be applied in multiple coatings over a dark clay body. They flow a good deal and their color can vary due to this glaze flow, from thin in such areas as the edges of the form, to thick where they have had a chance to pool. These color changes have appeal because they create an interesting play of light and dark.
  2. Hi all! The company we work with that formulates our slip is having difficulties achieving the necessary properties for casting. The issues are due to the fact that they are taking a plastic throwing body, and are trying to convert it into a casting slip. Due to the fact that we have little control of that formulation, I do not know the exact recipe for the slip. We are just curious how difficult it is to create a Mid-Range Red Casting Slip that is properly flocculated, and casts evenly with no issues. After firing, the color we are trying to achieve is a Red-Orange, preferably something that withstands thermal shock since we are creating drinking vessels. Does anyone have any recipes, or reasons why a high-iron casting slip acts weird? Thank you all for your time!
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