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Found 192 results

  1. Hi all I can see from other posts that you are a very helpful bunch I am attempting to buy a second-hand front loader which has a simmerstat but no controller. Can't afford to retrofit a controller and I have used kilns in the past with kiln sitters which are helpful enough to get the results I need. Is is possible to retro-fit a kiln sitter? As these are mechanical devices I suspect that would be more difficult than the electronics of a controller? I am UK based and my husband is an electrical engineer so we can deal with any technical stuff. Thank you in advance
  2. Ugh, just UGH! I had a huge load to fire for a very important community project. Using a Cone 4-6 stoneware and Cone 4-6 glaze. Normally I fire to cone 5 and let it soak for 5 minutes. The kiln was almost to temp when I left for work this morning. (yes, I know, never leave a kiln, but I couldn't be late to work and the basement is all concrete and it was supposedly almost done) It should have been cool and ready to unload when I got home. instead, at the top of the stairs, I heard it. "cu-lick" "Rats. I thought to myself, I must have a rat in the basement, I would LOVE to have a rant in my basement because if that's not what it was... CU-LICK." Yes, my 10.5 hour firing went 20 hours. It appeared to be stuck at 2112 degrees. All three segment lights were lit. I don't know if a relay went out, if an element broke or what, but it appears to not have reached cone and just held shy of cone 5 for 9+ hours. What's killing me right now is wondering how bad it is inside. Are the pieces ruined, stuck to the shelf or in a gooey puddle at the bottom (that's probably not likely) This was the ONE time I didn't use witness cones because the thing was jammed so full I didn't have the space. The thing is still WAY too hot to consider even taking a quick peek. For the next several hours, I have nothing to do but obsess because this was a VERY important load (yeah, because that's how it happens) If in fact they aren't ruined and I can get them out by 4:00 AM, there is hope. So let's play a game... So Brain Trust. If in fact this was a 9 hour soak below the cone I was firing to, how bad is it likely to be?
  3. Hello I’m new here! I may be buying a used electric skutt kiln. Model 231 max cone 8. As far as a visual inspection what should I look for before buying? Specific problem areas or things I should know that would be a deal breaker ? Also any links to get more familiar with kilns ? Thank you :)
  4. As found groove crack after firing , Attachment :-Top view of Groove with crack in shell Item
  5. I have an Amaco top load kiln. It is 21 years old and gets light use-8-10 05 firings per year. Elements seem to be burning out more frequently the past few years. Is that typical of an older kiln or could there be a repairable issue causing it? The cost is adding up, and I wonder if it is time to replace.
  6. Hi! I'm an art teacher in Pine, AZ. I've gotten approval to put a kiln outside my art room on a cement pad. There is limited space, so I was looking at purchasing a small metal shed to house it in. (5x6ft with 6ft ceiling). I've called Skutt and they said their only concern would be it getting too hot and shutting down. I was going to install 2 roof turbine vents at the top and fire with the doors open. Also, I'll be doing the majority of my firing during winter (which here is more in the 40-50 degree weather). It would be a Skutt KS1027 Kiln, a shorter/wider model. Does anyone have any experience with this? What would you suggest? and Thankyou!
  7. Hello, I'm working on getting a kiln, and I'm considering getting a used Duncan automatic teacher plus. They are asking for $850 for it and say they only fired it a couple times. I haven't been able to find anything about this kiln, or a new one listed for sale on any of the websites I've previously looked at like clay king, kiln frog, etc. I don't feel very comfortable buying a kiln I can't find any info about. Does anyone have experience with this particular kiln? Is the price reasonable? I can't even figure out what size it is!
  8. Hi, My very old small top loader has finally given up on me and I am looking at buying a second hand replacement. I've been looking at a cromartie hobby tech 40 with a sitter, and the seller says it will fire to 1260 cone 7-8 I use, on 13amp plug, but I've seen someone else blog that working it out technically such a kiln will never reach stoneware. Can anyone advise me whether this kiln will really reach stoneware regularly, it's all I fire to? Or whether the person is correct and it is a theoretical temperature of 1300 that is achievable but not what will happen in the real world. I don't want to buy a white elephant. Thanks
  9. I need to find the best All-In-One clay for cone 5, great for both hand building and wheel throwing I know. That's a tall order. But I can dream. I have a pug mill and don't want 2 bodies. Problem: I have too many problems with my gas kiln for cone 06 anymore. I'm DONE. I am moving to cone 5. Criteria / Factors: I'm in Southern California I teach 180 high school students grades 9-12, all levels of art skills, so it has to take punishment Not too sandy on the wheel, not too smooth or squishy for hand building Not too dense so it is so top-heavy when trimming I'm willing to pug the new clay to soften it for throwing, if it is stiff and great for hand building, or visa versa Doesn't stain clothes or the tables, rolling pins, or make a mess everywhere Is not pure white (students can't see where they missed glazing spots when using light color glazes - painting) Good leather hard, doesn't soften up too easily when re-wetting to score things together Doesn't take every indentation to the surface of pieces, temperamentalD Centers on the wheel fairly easily, especially for teen girls with tiny hands Can take a good amount of water from beginners Pulling walls, it is strong, doesn't warp or sag easily Won't dry out too quickly in hands while hand building Doesn't bend or warp easily when removing from the wheel Not so soft that it caves when cutting and sliding off the wheel Doesn't make teens hate the class because it stains clothes or gets everywhere and of course, takes glazes well and can handle a little fluctuation in gas environments Cone 5 clays I've Tried: Laguna - Dover White: Nice clay, but pure white. easy to center, but A little soft when hand building Laguna - Plain (Buff): Nice light tan color, easy center and to rehydrate if repairing, but a bit too squishy and shows every dent Laguna - Moroccan Sand: I love this clay, doesn't leave residue - color, but a bit dense to center. It is really dark grayish brown, if they only could lighten it Laguna - Buff with Sand: Nice tan color, but WAY too sandy for students on the wheel Laguna - Greystone: Too dense and top heavy for small pieces, hard to center, but really takes a beating with water, warps when thin due to density of surrounding clay Laguna - Speckled Buff: A bit dark in color, has iron so it gets read everywhere, could stain (think girls with pure white vans) Laguna - LB-6: hmmm, can't remember, but nixed it very soon after Laguna - Sante Fe: OMG - red EVERYWHERE, like a crime scene Aardvark Clay - SBF - Too dark tan - a bit sticky for students Aardvark Clay -Arctic White: Too white Opinions???? Go!!!
  10. Hello All, I have a kiln full of goods and I want to fire it. I am a potter and have been teaching myself how to fire my kiln. So far I have been using the pre-programmed firing schedules. I now want to try a slow cooling schedule. My kiln is a Cone Art and my controller is a Bartlett. I have the firing schedule that I want to apply and I have a simple example of how to program a firing schedule with the Bartlett - but I am confused as to how to use their "9999" cooling rate code. Their example shows using "9999" at the end of a sequence but I want to use it in the middle of a sequence. My Cone 6 Glaze Firing program that I want to use: 100 deg/hr to 200 deg 350 deg/hr to 2000 deg 150 deg/hr to 2185 deg hold 15 mins 500 deg/hr to 1900 deg *** 125 deg/hr to 1400 deg allow kiln to cool naturally to room temp *** It is this stage that I don't know how to actually enter the values into the Bartlett. The notes in the Firing Book and on Ceramics.org say "I program... kiln fro 9999 degF to 1900degF so that I don't get an error message if the kiln can't cool at that rate" Is this a typo? Is the person meaning they program a "RATE of 9999 DEG/HR" (rather than entering 500 deg/hr? If someone could help sort this out for me I would REALLY appreciate it. Take care, Liane
  11. Hello community, first post, looking for help. Got an old Skutt kilnsetter model 231 (electric) kiln donated to me. Specs for the kiln are single phase 240volt pulling 47AMP. The electricians who ran the line apparently only installed 40amp breakers which I am working to fix, the kiln constantly trips the breaker when going to high on all 3 knobs. I just bought the envirovent downdraft vent kit for the kiln, but since this thing is older than I am, I am worried it will be pulling air in from all the gaps in each section - (base to section 1 aka low section, section 1-2, 2-3, and 3-lid). I blame this intelligent community for my paranoia because until recently I had been keeping only 1 peep hole open on firings but a recent glazed bisque firing yielded a bunch of what looked like burnt pieces and it was devastating. There was post about oxidation kilns and how I should be firing greenware with all peep holes open and the lid propped by ceramic fiber blanket until I reach 1700F. This took a lot longer, especially with me running down to breaker to reset (wrong amperage breaker, will fix) but in order to increase efficiency I want to seal each gap with blanket on the outside, was thinking of buying more fiber blanket, cutting strips 3-4 inches wide, and wrapping around the kiln so the downdraft vent can successfully pull air in through the top. Or wrapping around most of outside except manual dial area. I don't have actual peep hole plugs so I made some out of clay, which I would keep in place and figure out some way to insulate those with blanket too. Is this necessary? I read some forum where there was a comment made about the blanket causing issues for the steel wrapping around the firebrick which I would be covering and I dont want to cause more issues. I also have some kiln cement I could mix in and attempt to spackle in each gap but I already know this wont stay, seal, or work well. chemical hazard with the kiln cement as well, not ideal. The kiln and its firebrick is in ok condition, I think the kiln is 30 years old, but the small gaps will very likely reduce effectiveness of the drilled holes. I'm worried I'll do all this work installing the vent, and when I hold a flame to the lid holes I drilled, it won't suck it in much. Also, being an engineer I like the idea of insulating the outside of the kiln if there aren't many risks associated with this. THANK YOU IN ADVANCE FOR YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS!
  12. Hi, I am new to this forum and I am looking for some advice. My wife and I are looking to install a kiln in our home. She primarily throws on the potters wheel, small bowls & dishes. We have an electric kiln & potters wheel, however due to our breaker box situation, there is no way for us to run a 220V line to the electric kiln without spending a pretty penny to expand and draw more power. We found a good sized, used gas kiln for sale, about $250. Great shape. Few questions on my mind: 1. Can you run a traditional natural gas line (like you would for outdoor grill, fireplace, stove, etc.) for a gas kiln? I see that some of them actually run on propane tanks. 2. If you are running an average sized gas kiln, what are you paying per firing? 3. If you run the kiln with the proper ventilation in the garage and supervision, would this setup work? 4. If you have a gas kiln in Indiana for sale, please contact me. Any other advise for our situation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! Edit as of 10/4/18: We decided to go with an electric kiln. Thank you for all the advice.
  13. HI there. I've literally joined this group today as it seems like everyone is really knowledgeable and I was hoping you may be able to help me figure out whether you think it's worth it to buy a new kiln or take a chance on a second-hand one? I've been looking on eBay as it's cheaper to buy second hand but being completely new to pottery I don't really know what I'm looking for. I would like to have the option to fire porcelain eventually so it would have to be able to reach those temps, but apart from that there are so many options....it seems to be a bit of a minefield. I don't reallywant to buy a white elephant and just wondered about other people's experiences? Cheers Benjinca
  14. My friend and I recently bought a used kiln and wheel. Our first test with the kiln we messed up and fired our stuff to cone 6 (instead of 06). We hadn't had a lot in the kiln, just a few really small cut-out pieces. It took about 6.5 hours to get close to cone 6, but the large 6 cone didn't fully drop, and the cone 7 didn't really move much, so we weren't totally sure if it was fully done. Moving on to our second fire. We had new things to fire, so we bisque fired our stuff (half full with things stacked) to cone 06 this time. Our cone sitter fell out when we closed it (not sure exactly what happened), so after 6.5 hours, we stopped it. We again weren't 100% sure if things we underfired, overfired, or totally perfect. We tried the "lick" test and it was sticking to our tongue. We decided to glaze it and fire to completion. This time, our kiln was full. We didn't put anything on our bottom level (we were worried out glaze would run and it would ruin the kiln). We put in a cone 7 sitter (to make sure it fired completely to cone 6) and we had our large cones to watch at the top and bottom of our kiln. After almost 11 hours, it still wasn't complete (and it was 1am) so we turned it off and left it. So now I'm left with a million questions. 1) How can I tell if it is completely fired? 2) Can I re-fire the stuff and would I have to fire it from start, another 12+ hours? 3) I've read a million posts talking about different kiln lengths, but I'm wondering how exactly you can tell how long it would take? 4) I think our bottom heat isn't as strong as our tops, so should I be putting thinner stuff at the bottom? Or just get the heaters fixed? 5) If our bisque fire wasn't fully fired, would that make our glaze fire take longer? Thanks so much for any help! Already this website has been a huge help for my friend and I. We basically use this as a pottery bible. UPDATE!! We re-fired our glaze and this time everything went off after 8 hours. The glaze is a little runny, but our main concern is the bottom elements not being the best. We had our thin stuff at the bottom, and it did glaze over, but the cones didn't change at all. The top cones did, though!
  15. So, I picked up a new-ish kiln off of an auction site, from a local school district. I knew that the kiln wasn't working, and that it had some damage, based on the photos they shared. But it looked like it was still in good shape, and I didn't spend too much on it, all things considered. The control boxes look practically new, minus a little discoloration on one of the wire wraps, that can be seen in one of the photos in the gallery. Obviously, the BIGGEST issue is, the bottom slab/ bottom brick damage. That was more than I expected. I've never seen anything like this (Heard about, but never seen), but I'm sure Neil has seen things like this from time to time. If you look at the photo of the slab, you can see, and may even be able to guess what happened. You'll notice the melted mass (The shelf posts are stuck in those positions), and even see that some of the bottom wall bricks, along with most of the bottom element came with the bottom, when I took them apart. After I got it into my work shop, I think I figured out what happened. The control is a kiln sitter, with a back up timer. The sitter rod, on the inside has some black "glass" connecting the rod, with the insulating tube, and cone supports. I don't know if that was from a firing before the kiln's "last" firing, or the one, where it stopped working. Regardless, the sitter was not functional, and my guess is the kiln just never shut off. What I thought was a runny glaze on the bottom slab, is actually melted clay. You can actually see pieces that didn't fully melt, still there. I can't say if it was a mid to high fire clay that was just fired too long. Or if it was low fire clay, that was mistakenly fired too hot. Or some combination of any of that. Soooo, I've got some work ahead of me. I need a new slab, which luckily, I have one from another kiln, that I never got around to fixing. Same size and model, just older. Then I need to replace the bottom bricks and element(s). Hopefully, that will get it functional. Time to get to work!
  16. Hi, I have this problem of cracking or clay splitting when throwing in the wheel, pls find the attached picture and also, after firing at cone 08, the clay has a lot of surface cracks and sometimes structural cracks pls find the attached pic, pls advise why this is happening and how to avoid this in future. Thanks.
  17. I was given an older paragon kiln with a set n fire. Its model lt-3k and I have no idea how to use it yet. I want to fire cone 6 stoneware and already have some greenware ready to fire and plenty of furniture. Any advice would be great!
  18. Hi, I’m new to this, total novice! I’ve been given a kiln I can’t find instructions to. i tried to fire it up to try it out and it just turned off. here are some pics: Thanks in advance
  19. Hi All, I would like to get advice about purchasing a new kiln. I'm an Elementary Art teacher in North East Florida. We have over 600 students and growing. I would really appreciate input on the best size and brand to purchase. My budget is $1500 - $2000. I am a painter and photographer, so ceramics is out of my comfort zone. I will be operating the kiln at home, in the 2 car garage, if that influences choices. (No cars park in the garage.) Thank you! Rhonda
  20. Hi everyone, I recently fired a gas kiln but there was very poor reduction and my pieces (with a celadon glaze) came out oxidised. Would it work to refire these same pieces in a fully-functioning gas kiln? Is there any reason the might not reduce as they have already been high-fired? Thank you!
  21. We have an old evenheat kiln that we're struggling to master. It's a 4320 model but with the 4 toggle switches and not the 4 dials. Our problem is that the top element takes way longer to heat up than the other 3. We did a paper test and initially it appeared that the top element wasn't warming up at all, after 30 seconds the lower 3 elements had all scorched their pieces of paper while the top was still unmarked. We took the cover panel off and tightened a couple of wires that appeared overly loose, one going to the top element and one going to the grounding point. The top element now at least get hot enough to scorch the paper but takes at least twice as long as the other elements. So the switch works and the element works but we're stuck as to where to go next. The only thing I can see different with the top element circuit and the others is that the top circuit includes a "therm-o-disk" which appears to be some kind of bimetallic thermostat. Could that be the cause of our issue? Or could it simply be that in this model of kiln the top element doesn't get so hot because it's at the top where all the heat rises to anyway. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. We're really struggling to get consistent glaze firings in this kiln and now there's two of us potting away going back to the small kiln would be painful, not to mention lead to further global warming.
  22. Without much experience or knowledge, and a call to Georgie's (skutt is closed on wknds! arrgh) I've narrowed it down to what I think I should get, with two other small kilns that require 240 voltage as runner ups. Until I call Skutt and ask for further advice I won't be giving anyone any money. At this point cone 6 would be like manna from heaven compared to the low fires done by the shop I go to. Just to complicate matters I picked up a truly ancient Paragon for $200 bucks which seems restorable and almost certainly fires off 240 voltage and who knows what else, and if I can get it running someday, not now, supposedly will fire to cone 10. However I'm not going to invest that kind of cash at this point for various personal reasons. Anyway here's what I'm looking at ctl+pasted off the Georgie's site. As I mentioned it's pretty much down to Skutt because otherwise I'll have to go hundreds of miles further to get parts service for any other brand, and I like Skutt's customer service and reputation: Any experience with 120 volt kilns? Do they really work or have problems? Thanks. KM614-3 Handy for artists with limited space, and also a true precision device for jewelers, metal workers and dollmakers. The only kiln in the KM series that runs on common household 120-volt power (with a 30 amp breaker and outlet required). Reaches cone 6. Chamber size 11" x 13-1/2". Capacity 0.8 cubic feet. Uses 120-volt power with a 30 amp breaker. Georgies price does not include freight or delivery charges to your location. Shipping weight is 88 pounds. KM614-3 Skutt KM614-3 KilnMaster Electronic Ceramic Kiln Skutt KilnMaster KM-614-3 KM-614-3 Skutt KM614 electronic ceramic kiln fires to cone 6 with 0.8 cubic feet capacity. Chamber dimensions 11" wide by 13-1/2" deep. Skutt KM614-3 KilnMaster Electronic Ceramic Kiln
  23. Since day 1 I wanted to do wood firing. I started with an electric kiln and although it is possible to do interesting things I'm still focused on ultimately doing Anagama. I cant truly test Cone 10 glazes in my electric and want to get as close to possible to that environment, which means a way to do reduction, neutral and oxidation. So I got a broke down Duncan kiln donated to me and the burner came in today so I'm super excited!!! Stripping it down tonight and getting the elements out then will figure out how to cut the burner port and the top opening. Then I have to find a 40 - 50 gallon tank. Gaaaaaaah excited! df
  24. Hi, I'm still fairly inexperienced and used to always fire my pottery at a studio where I went to classes etc, so the adventure of firing in my own kiln is still pretty new to me. I was given an old electric kiln, which is now connected and running, any dangling heating coils were fixed, and the whole thing was given a once-over by a kiln engineer. The kiln has an electric controller and I've set a number of different programmes (biscuit, cone 6, cone 8, etc). I've done a few firings so far, 3 biscuit firings and one glaze firing to cone 8. While none of the firings have gone wrong and everything seems to be working fine, I noticed that despite the temp controller there seem to be fluctuations in the temperature. I was using orton cones to check the kiln was firing up to temp and I find that for a biscuit firing it consistently seems to fire to slightly below temp (so first cone will just start to dip rather than lying flat, the other two are not touched). For the higher glaze firing the opposite seemed to be true - when I checked all the cones had dipped - the first two had completely keeled over, the last one (for the highest temp) was about half-way. I realise that these are fairly minor temp fluctuations, but is this a normal thing? I imagine with glaze firings it could make all the difference? Could outside temp account for it? The kiln is in a shed so in winter it does get pretty cold.
  25. I'm using a 1227 skutt 1980 kiln with sitter..its always been quite slow to fire. But, this is a first.. it have been on high for 48 hours and still not reached temperature. First- is that safe for it to be on for so long? Second it is hitting cone 5 but not cone 6. Its very close. My cone is starting to bend but its just not there. -also all elements, relays, and wiring are 100%. Is it ok to keep letting it run and hope it hits cone 6 in the next few hours or should i shut the kiln off since its been cone 5 for over 24 hours...?
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