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Found 176 results

  1. Hi, I'm still fairly inexperienced and used to always fire my pottery at a studio where I went to classes etc, so the adventure of firing in my own kiln is still pretty new to me. I was given an old electric kiln, which is now connected and running, any dangling heating coils were fixed, and the whole thing was given a once-over by a kiln engineer. The kiln has an electric controller and I've set a number of different programmes (biscuit, cone 6, cone 8, etc). I've done a few firings so far, 3 biscuit firings and one glaze firing to cone 8. While none of the firings have gone wrong and everything seems to be working fine, I noticed that despite the temp controller there seem to be fluctuations in the temperature. I was using orton cones to check the kiln was firing up to temp and I find that for a biscuit firing it consistently seems to fire to slightly below temp (so first cone will just start to dip rather than lying flat, the other two are not touched). For the higher glaze firing the opposite seemed to be true - when I checked all the cones had dipped - the first two had completely keeled over, the last one (for the highest temp) was about half-way. I realise that these are fairly minor temp fluctuations, but is this a normal thing? I imagine with glaze firings it could make all the difference? Could outside temp account for it? The kiln is in a shed so in winter it does get pretty cold.
  2. Hi, I have this problem of cracking or clay splitting when throwing in the wheel, pls find the attached picture and also, after firing at cone 08, the clay has a lot of surface cracks and sometimes structural cracks pls find the attached pic, pls advise why this is happening and how to avoid this in future. Thanks.
  3. Without much experience or knowledge, and a call to Georgie's (skutt is closed on wknds! arrgh) I've narrowed it down to what I think I should get, with two other small kilns that require 240 voltage as runner ups. Until I call Skutt and ask for further advice I won't be giving anyone any money. At this point cone 6 would be like manna from heaven compared to the low fires done by the shop I go to. Just to complicate matters I picked up a truly ancient Paragon for $200 bucks which seems restorable and almost certainly fires off 240 voltage and who knows what else, and if I can get it running someday, not now, supposedly will fire to cone 10. However I'm not going to invest that kind of cash at this point for various personal reasons. Anyway here's what I'm looking at ctl+pasted off the Georgie's site. As I mentioned it's pretty much down to Skutt because otherwise I'll have to go hundreds of miles further to get parts service for any other brand, and I like Skutt's customer service and reputation: Any experience with 120 volt kilns? Do they really work or have problems? Thanks. KM614-3 Handy for artists with limited space, and also a true precision device for jewelers, metal workers and dollmakers. The only kiln in the KM series that runs on common household 120-volt power (with a 30 amp breaker and outlet required). Reaches cone 6. Chamber size 11" x 13-1/2". Capacity 0.8 cubic feet. Uses 120-volt power with a 30 amp breaker. Georgies price does not include freight or delivery charges to your location. Shipping weight is 88 pounds. KM614-3 Skutt KM614-3 KilnMaster Electronic Ceramic Kiln Skutt KilnMaster KM-614-3 KM-614-3 Skutt KM614 electronic ceramic kiln fires to cone 6 with 0.8 cubic feet capacity. Chamber dimensions 11" wide by 13-1/2" deep. Skutt KM614-3 KilnMaster Electronic Ceramic Kiln
  4. I'm using a 1227 skutt 1980 kiln with sitter..its always been quite slow to fire. But, this is a first.. it have been on high for 48 hours and still not reached temperature. First- is that safe for it to be on for so long? Second it is hitting cone 5 but not cone 6. Its very close. My cone is starting to bend but its just not there. -also all elements, relays, and wiring are 100%. Is it ok to keep letting it run and hope it hits cone 6 in the next few hours or should i shut the kiln off since its been cone 5 for over 24 hours...?
  5. Please delete or move if this is the wrong section. I searched and couldn't find a similar post. I recently moved to Austin, Texas and am looking for a local (or semi-local) wood or salt kiln that is communal. 90% of my work in college was woodfired using the college wood kiln, and now that I'm graduated I find myself in Austin with no idea how to continue atmospheric firings. I can't build a kiln in the back yard as I'm renting, so I'm looking for any community-accessible kilns I can fire in. Obviously, willing to trade labor and shifts for kiln space. I hope there is something available because I love the community aspect of firing with wood, and I want to continue my journey in that direction.
  6. Just setting up a little pottery studio at home and have bought a brand new kiln from Potclays. (I'm in UK.) The instructions are sadly inadequate and Potclays have not been very helpful so far. I wondered if someone here could help me more quickly as I'm keen to do my first test firing. They have sent me some 06 test cones. For the first test, they tell me to fire the kiln to take 5 hours to reach 750 degrees C. Once it reaches 700 (after 4 3/4 hours), they say I should check the cone at 15 minute intervals. They do not say what I am checking for. I have asked them but they have not given me a clear answer. For the second test, they say I should repeat the procedure but firing to 1000 degrees C. For this firing they say the cone should bend tip to base. What I don't understand is: if the cone bends right over at 1000 degrees C, what will the same cone do at 750 degrees C? I need to know what I'm checking for; otherwise there's no point in checking. Please help!
  7. tjbanjo

    how hot?

    How hot does a ^5.5 Orton pyrometric cone have to get to melt? I fired the kiln, I thought, to 1201 Celsius. This is a problem. Anybody know where to find a kiln tech in China?
  8. tjbanjo

    firebrick crack

    Does this crack in the firebrick in the lid of my kiln need some kind of attention? I've been told both yes and no. It's a Shimpo DUA-15 kiln. Bob
  9. hello I have just purchased a second hand cromartie hobbytech 40 kiln with an lt3k kiln sitter, having never fired my own work (I have always had a technician do it) I was wondering about the ramping speed to fire stoneware. The kiln has a dial on the side from 1 to 4 and then full, I was wondering how long I should leave between each increase in power. as I understand it too quick an increase in temperature could cause the clay to break due to the steam. here is a picture of the kiln dial. also the Kiln has a peep hole in the side and a vent hole on top, should I leave both open during firing? regards Liam
  10. I have a question regarding some theory I read in the text The Kiln Book. On page 78 of the 4th Edition, it states that: "At the point where the exit flues enter the chimney, they should be restricted so that the chimney cross section is larger than this flue area" In the diagram (3-11) beneath this, it shows decreasing the point of entry to the chimney by 25% (from 4 bricks to 3), coming from the kiln exit flue. What's the thought behind this? I'm happy to trust my elders, but I'd also like to know what the theory is. I'm curious how this decrease affects the firing, vs keeping the same area of flow in the inlet flue>exit flue>chimney entry>chimney. As I'm building a chimney coming up in the next couple weeks, I'd love to figure this out. I can taper in the walls of the exit flue to the entry point of the chimney, which would accelerate flow heading into the chimney (while also creating slight backpressure?), which would then open back up to the full area of the chimney as it rises. Thoughts? Thanks in advance!
  11. Howdy Y'all I have the opportunity to potentially build a wood fired kiln here in Colorado. The space is figured out and there are kiln shelves to be used. Now all I need to do is figure out to where to get firebrick for free or very cheap and design a kiln! easy peasy..... I was wondering if anyone could point me towards good places to search for used firebrick. I know firebrick is used in many industrial applications to line furnaces etc but I am unsure exactly what type of businesses would use these. Does anyone have experience sourcing free firebrick? My second question is if anyone is familiar with any good computer software that can be used to design kilns? Mainly I would like it to just play around with simple designs so it doesn't need to be terribly complex. If anyone knows of a program like this I would love to hear about it! Thanks! -Adam
  12. potterpat

    Olsen Kiln Kit

    I am considering purchasing an Olsen kiln kit. I have scoured the internet and found no negative reports on them. I have fired a small updraft to cone 10 for years, so feel that I have solid experience in firing an updraft, and buying a kit means that the design and calculations have already been done, so it should be a slam dunk. Buy it, put it together and fire pots...right? Anyone care to weigh in on this? Thank you!! Pat
  13. aperhapshand

    Old Damaged Kiln

    HI All, I am currently helping with a just starting out Art Gallery and Community art center. I have worked in community studios for quite a few years and have helped a similar style studio start their ceramics room/department. My concern is that The Owners were gifted a kiln that is a VERY OLD manual electric Duncan - I heard somewhere that the year is in the serial number; if true the kiln is from 1964 . The kiln is in pretty bad shape. The electrical and the heating elements don't look too bad, but the floor and the lid are in really bad shape. The floor is crumbling, the edges of on the outside are rusted, the brick/board on the lid is cracked, and it just looks rough. I have told the owner, his wife, the Gallery Director; anyone, that will listen, that I am not comfortable firing it with how rough this kiln looks to be. The Owner had his friend, who seems to know a great deal about kilns, to look at it. The friend is suggesting repairing it by pouring, a concrete-like, floor and just tightening the lid. He said he could rerun the heating elements as well. This is beyond my knowledge, and if it was my center I would just buy a new kiln. They have invested a great deal of money into the space. I have offered a huge amount of free knowledge and experience to help get this up and running but am not financially contributing. The Owner doesn't seem to be interested in investing in a new kiln. My gut is telling me not to fire the kiln. . . but I am a very cautious person naturally . . . Am I worried about nothing? How old and how damaged is too damaged? Thank you for any help or insight you have.
  14. I was asked about the pros and cons of buying a Cone 10 Skutt, (6.4 cu ft) vs a Cone 8 Skutt (9.9 cu ft) for firing at cone 6. I'd suspect one might run into element wear sooner with the larger kiln, but since I really don't know, I'm hoping someone might have some insights. Thank you.
  15. My gas kiln is powered by two venturi burners, of uncertain specification and unknown origin. I have a feeling that they are more than a little inefficient, and in any case are sometimes very finicky to use. I also suspect that they are over-powered for the size of kiln I have. It may be that they could be re-jetted, or something, but to be honest I'd rather just get some modern burners. So, before I buy some new burners, I'd like to be sure I'm getting the correct specification. The kiln is a traditionally designed down-draft, more or less cubic in shape, with a sprung arch. The overall interior volume is 20 cubic feet. The burners fire horizontally into minimally bag-walled fireboxes, from diametrically opposite corners. Gas is bottled propane. The walls of the kiln are 4-inch thick soft IFBs, with a further 2 inch layer of ceramic fibre on the outside. Chimney is a little over 12 feet. The maximum performance required from the kiln is to fire to cone 6 in 8 hours (less would be good). Often, I'm only firing earthenware to cone 03. According to what I can find, the kiln theoretically requires 200,000 Btu per hour, so 2 x 100,000 Btu burners should be about right. Any kiln gurus out there who can tell me if I'm about right in my findings? I'd like to get it right! Many thanks!
  16. Well folks! I've been off and on here for a while now and I thought I would ask the community what they thought of my 5 year plan (now 4 years). I've never in my life been so motivated to create something like this. If anyone has stories they want to share or advice about making the jump from one career to another it would be greatly appreciated. First a little background on my situation - I work a full time job and am compensated fairly well. Its just not something I want to do the rest of my life. We have debt that we need to pay off that should be done in 2 years if all goes well. I have accepted that this venture might fail, or that we might not make enough for us to survive on. But that is not stopping me from going full steam ahead and will not be used as an excuse to let things slide or for any type of failure. Accepting that things don't always work out frees up mental energy so I can focus on the things that need to be done. I have to work my day gig 40+ hours a week. Nights and weekends are dedicated to improving my throwing, building some standard shapes and pieces and general scheming and dreaming. We've procured and LLC and a CPA (have not gotten a Sales Tax ID or a Tax Exempt ID because we are not officially selling as a business yet) A business loan and credit cards are pretty much out of the picture. My wife is working full time and is currently on course for a degree in business administration so that is helping out a lot too! We have a business plan in place and are researching our customers and demographic and where and when to sell (this is a continual investigation but Etsy will probably be our first sales platform as we have used it before) I know a lot of that depends on what we are making as a studio - Functional Ware / Cups / bowls / Plates / Serving Dishes / Vases / Lidded Vessels / all in various sizes to create my own line (while like every other potter - experimenting and improving along the way) We are building our social network presence slowly but surely. We are calculating our current personal expenses, time, operating expenses, capital, etc... (again since it's an ever changing thing its ongoing and we'll get dialed in the more data the further we move along) Currently we are working out of the garage with two wheels and an electric Kiln which is being used as a bisque kiln and a test fire kiln. I have a spot where I can woodfire twice a year. This is my sticking point. I am not interested in mid-fire at all. Woodfiring twice a year does not give me enough feedback or testing or experience to line up within this timeframe. Woodfiring is a 10 year goal. Getting up and running in my own studio is my 5 year goal so high fire with gas makes sense. I will be investing in some large propane tanks and I already have a burner and a converted electric kiln so I can do experiments and small amounts of work fired in that for the time being. A decent size gas kiln will be a considerable investment and the heart of the studio. I don't think it is possible to run a good size gas kiln in my garage studio. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I think renting a building and installing a gas kiln does not make sense at this point but at some point I will have to get up and going at full scale. For those of you that own studios when did you consider renting and installing a kiln? Thanks for any input / experience you want to share.
  17. Hey y'all -- So I have an old Jenken sitter kiln I got from a retired potter (along with my other equipment). Earlier this year I converted to fire with gas (downdraft), using a homemade cast-iron burner with a squirrel-cage fan. I don't have any issues getting it up to temperature, but I have noticed that it is significantly cooler closer to the bottom of the kiln, and it feels like an unacceptable portion of my work is not getting the heatwork it needs. I don't load anything on the floor of the kiln, but have some bricks to help steer the heat. I've tried a couple configurations, but every time I fire there are very significant differences across the strata of the kiln. I'm pretty frustrated and can use some guidance. Some details The burner sits underneath the kiln and fires upward into the kiln, close to its edge. There is an external chimney made of soft firebrick. The flame enters the chimney through a port on the side of the kiln, which is on the other side from the flame's entry, floor-level. I've cut a little bit off of the shelves I'm using to allow for the heat to move unimpeded. I'm not an expert by any means -- my initial thoughts are that the heat is moving past the first shelf too quickly, or has no reason to linger there. I'm considering placing the second shelf offset, so as to block the flame and persuading it to move around toward the top of the kiln, sort of like a spiral. I'm concerned about possible crackage, though, or any issues I might not be foreseeing. Just curious about any thoughts that y'all might have. I understand that gas kiln conversion problems are probably tricky to diagnose, but I'm wondering if there's something elementary I could try that I've overlooked, or some kind of general troubleshooting checklist for those of you who have more experience tinkering with this method than I do. thanks! Kevin
  18. kayleeanderson

    Kiln Install on Deck

    Hi all! I'm currently in the process of installing a kiln. I live in the city and the kiln is going on our outdoor deck. I understand there is a fire hazard. The plan is to install a base steel sheet, a layer of cinder blocks, then a layer of bricks, and lastly another sheet of steel. This would then have the kiln stand on it. I have a small L &L easy-Fire 2.6 cu ft electric kiln. I fire to cone 04 at hottest. It will have sufficient spacing from surrounding walls. It will also be protected from weathering. I'm looking for advice on raising the kiln. Does my plan sound sufficient? Is it overkill? At most I will be firing this kiln here for a year. Thank you for your help! Warmly, Kaylee Anderson
  19. I have decided to take the leap and build my own studio. I want to put in a front load gas kiln and would like input. I searched the forums and unless I missed it, I couldn't find much on gas kilns, so forgive me if this topic has already been addressed. I have been looking at the Olympic DD12 and the Bailey Front Load Standard 18/12 and I have also talked to Seattle Pottery about their Crucible front load kiln. The Bailey is about twice the price of the Olympic and the Crucible. My plan is to have an attached shed on the studio in which to put the kiln. I live in Montana so it will need to be protected from the weather. I figured it would be better to decide on the kiln so I can know what size to make the shed - area and ceiling height. I would appreciate any thoughts, experiences and ideas. Thanks.
  20. Hi Everyone, Wondering if anyone has put an electric kiln in garage. I'm aware of the fumes, flammables, and other risks but my primary purpose is to just do bisque fires. I don't want to install vent hoods and other ventilation parts and just want to open my garage doors. Thoughts and inputs are greatly appreciated.
  21. I work at a community studio, and we leave our vent fans running until the kilns are completely cool and ware is removed. I just fired my first glaze fire in my own kiln at home, and I'm questioning whether to leave the fan running after the firing has been completed. I have a 7 cubic foot L&L kiln with 3" brick and programmed it with a slow cooling cycle. Will the vent fan cause the kiln to cool too quickly and thus undo anything I might have accomplished with my program? I fire kilns three times a week at work, but I feel like I've never fired a kiln before now that it's my own kiln. Silly! Thank you in advance. Richarde
  22. Evening Ceramic Arts Community, After a long stint of teaching without a kiln, and then having the opportunity to work for a semester with one, I got the bug again and remembered how much I love clay under my fingernails. Serendipity steps in and I'm offered a free kiln just to clear it out of its current residence. Hopeful, but hesitant I visit the kiln to snap some pics and see what I can find out, as its been a long time since undergrad... So please take a look and let me know if/ what can be done. Skutt Model K Crack in the brick on kiln floor Flashing peeled away on base Lid loose, hinge partially attached. Chip in brick along top edge Exposed elements Much obliged, Eric
  23. Nettle

    New Kiln Prep

    Hiya, I've been lurking for a good while, but now I need to ask a newbie question please. I've just had my first kiln delivered - I can't play with it yet because it's not wired in. The instructions say I need to 'burn in' the kiln and furniture before first use, so am I correct to assume that this should be done before I put kiln wash on the shelves? Cheers, Annette
  24. I am rebuilding an AIM Gas Kiln model 2327G (About the size of a Skutt KM1027). I'm looking for help in finding a operating manual or copy of original instructions. I called Aim and they don't have instructions for the older gas kilns anymore. I'm interested in if there were baffles originally at the bottom of the kiln to redirect the flame. It has 3 Gaco 75,000 BTU burners and is set up for Natural Gas. It's about 20 feet from my Gas meter on a 3/4" line. Any input or help would be appreciated. I intend to fire at Cone 10 reduction.
  25. Hi There, I have an e23T L&L kiln. I have 1/4" holes in the bottom of the kiln. There are 2. I've been having trouble with bloating and pin holes during glazing. A colleague suggested I might need to drill a couple of holes in the lid to help with the air circulation. I read in the L&L manual not to add more holes. How can I tell if I need more holes or not? Thanks!
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