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Found 2 results

  1. White Pottery Sugar Bowl

    From the album Mad About Pottery

    Hand thrown pottery sugar bowl is made with a speckled clay. The body and the lid are coated in a white glaze. T

    © Gittit Rad-El

  2. When I first learned to throw, trimming was one of the next things I had to master. My prof demonstrated using the trimming tools and working the outside edge of the piece and then working the foot ring in, then if needed leveling off the foot ring with a needle tool. I had very little problem with this technique, as we were using Randall wheels with plaster bats. Everything dried off the bat, and so there was not cutting off from the wheel head. Crank up 3 years when I started at Penn State and using metal wheel heads and having to cut everything off with cutting wire. Sloppy uneven bottoms that would grab my tools and cause uneven pots that had difficult times getting even-plus I was still a newbie. Someone, either a prof or student showed me to use a flat blade held perpendicular across the whole piece directly over the center. By pressing down with this blade the entire bottom would be leveled out. I started to use it constantly and found that there was never any need for the needle tool leveling of the foot ring. It also made it easier to get very even areas on casseroles, plates and other wider forms. I use the technique on nearly everything unless I decide to use a wiggle wire with an untrimmed base.
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