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  1. Maria Longworth Storer: 1849-1932 * founded The Cincinnati May Festival in 1871, which continues today. The first woman in US history to start an annual music festival. * one of the first women to exhibit their pottery at the first US held World Fair in 1876. * founded the Rookwood Pottery in 1879 with fellow female artist Mary Louise McLaughlin. * one of the first American potters to incorporate Japanese cultural art into their work. Mary Louise McLaughlin 1847-1939 *co-founder of the Rookwood Pottery in 1879 * in 1876, she became the first US potter to use the "underglaze" technique in pottery. She actually developed the technique that was a closely guarded secret of the Haviland Pottery in Europe. * wrote one of the first books on China Painting: China Painting: A Practical Manual for the Use of Amateurs in the Decoration of Hard Porcelain). * in 1880 she wrote the first book on "underglazing": Pottery Decoration under the Glaze * in the 1890's, she began producing porcelain fired pieces in her backyard: making her the first studio potter in the United States. The work of both of these women can be found at the Cincinnati Art Museum. Feel free to add your favorite artist/potter from our history, but please use the format shown. Nerd
  2. History of Japanese Ceramics New Hampshire Institute of Art Sharon Art Center Campus CER051 Nov 3 – Dec 8, 2015 (6 weeks) Tuesdays, 6 – 7:30pm Professor John Baymore $149 This series of slide lectures will explore the cultural context in which this art form developed and currently thrives, including the impact of geography, deeply held Shinto and Buddhist beliefs, the lifestyle of the Samurai class, and the impact of the Tea Ceremony on the art. We will look at the production of the Six Ancient Kilns, the Mingei Movement, the work of the Living National Treasures, and look at contemporary trends as new artist-potters throw off the shackles of centuries of tradition. Finally, we will look at how Japanese ceramics had an impact on contemporary American artist-potter’s work, and how Abstract Expressionism impacted the Japanese ceramists. (This is a bit similar in content to the full credit-bearing degree level course bearing the same course title. Without the heavy readings, papers, and exams!) Prerequisite: None To register BY PHONE: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836-2564 IN PERSON: Manchester Campus: Mon – Fri, 8:15 am – 4:30 pm Fuller Hall, 156 Hanover St. Sharon Arts Campus: Mon – Fri, 9 am – 3 pm 457 NH Route 123, Sharon, NH BY EMAIL: CERegistration@nhia.edu ONLINE: www.nhia.edu/ceregister BY MAIL: New Hampshire Institute of Art Continuing Education Office 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104-4858
  3. I need to pick the collective genius of the CAD family on a concept for a Junior Cornerstone course for higher ed students. Briefly, cornerstone courses are team taught, interdisciplinary, and cross-curriculum. The courses are generally a full semester long and intended to challenge students to stretch beyond their particular major/minor area of study. Note: the institution is Belmont University with a strong music, music business, and entrepreneurial business programs. Here is the concept. A class/community of students would do research on the history of ceramic musical instruments, select instruments (i.e. (drum,flute, udu, rattle, water whistle, etc.) to construct, actually build/fire their ceramic instruments, compose a musical work using only their projects, and would either record their work or perform it publicly (or both). The rubric for the course would evaluate the research (writing), technical skill (building the ceramic instrument - recording the work), creativity (the instrument & the musical score), musical composition (the score), and the individual and/or collective recorded music. The likely textbook would be Barry Hall's From Mud to Music. My questions: Does this sound (no pun intended) like a fun/challenging course? What would you add to the course to make it more interesting? What challenges would you anticipate,particularly the ceramics process? Is there already a course syllabus that someone is using at another institution? Thanks all! Paul
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