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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

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Found 28 results

  1. Pitting and pinholing

    Hi Everyone. I'm having major problems with pinholing and pitting. I am getting hundreds on pin holes on only the outside of small pots. I am using tucker's mid smooth stone and bisqueing to 04 with a 16 minute hold. I am dip glazing using amaco white with a 16 minute hold. I have noticed after I dip glaze that lots of popping bubbles appear on the outside of the pots in the glaze. More hold time? Is my kiln broken? Any help would be good . Thank you.
  2. Hi everyone, Hope you all have had a great weekend. I'm a messy glazer with drips everywhere and have had to redo the process on more than one occasion. I've just had a wonderful result from spraying underglaze onto my work and I'd really like to have a perfect finish. My questions are: Is it better to spray or to dip? If spraying, how many coats do I give the ware? Pics of the bisque below. Thanks in advance for your thoughts Andrea
  3. Week 9 In the opening paragraph of Chapter 1, Robin states: Some subjects learned in formal or foundational art training are invaluable to a lifetime of personal artistic growth, regardless of the medium in which we later work. One of the subjects he names is Drawing, the other is _____________________ Sculpture Mixed Media Color Theory Chemistry For convenience in calculation, materials are put into three columns with the Base (flux, also known as RO or R2O, sometimes referred to as the ____________ of the glaze) on the left, Amphoteric (usually clay, also known as R2O3, sometimes referred to as the muscle) in the center, and the Acid (glass-former, usually silica, also known as RO2, sometimes referred to as the bones of the glaze) on the right. Nerves brain organs blood Mocha diffusion, a slip technique that resembles moss agate gemstones is made by using a slip with a high degree of ball clay or plastic kaolin, such as EPK, along with an acidic material known as Mocha _____________. Tea Wash vinegar coffee Ceramic Decals have come a long way form their invention in England by John Stadler in ____________. These early decals were printed on tissue paper using etched or engraved copper plates inked with underglaze. 1850 1755 1910 1820 This weeks questions come from text in Making Marks, Discovering The Ceramic Surface, Robin Hopper, c. 2004, KP Books Note from Pres: If you do not own this text, or have not read it, it is the definitive text for decorating pottery at any stage from greenware through the firing. Other texts will give you more detailed information in some areas, but known of them that I have seen will give you the names and understanding that will allow you to search for more information as much as this one does. Answers: 3. Color Theory. . . .Some subjects learned in formal or foundation art training are invaluable to a lifetime of personal artistic growth, regardless of the medium in which we later work. Drawing and color theory are two such academic studies. Even if your ceramic work never directly utilizes them, it will improve because of your greater awareness and understanding of these two fundamentals. 4. blood. . . . . For convenience in calculation, materials are put into three columns with the Base (flux, also known as RO or R2O, sometimes referred to as the blood of a glaze) on the left, Amphoteric (usually clay, also known as R2O3, sometimes referred to as the muscle) in the center, and the Acid (glass-former, usually silica, also known as RO2, sometimes referred to as the bones of a glaze) on the right. It is the ratio among the three material types that determines the ï¬ring range, but primarily the fluxes that control color development. 1. Tea. . . The mixture used to form the patterns is called “mocha tea.†It originally was made by boiling tobacco leaves to form a thick sludge that then was thinned with water to a working consistency and mixed with color. 2. 1755. . . John Sadler of Liverpool, England, is credited with inventing ceramic transfer printing in 1755. He saw children placing printed material onto ceramic shards and rubbing the back of the print. As the ink technology was relatively crude, inks of the era were not especially fast drying, and the rubbing transferred the image to the broken crockery. Sadler’s “invention†was to ink etched or engraved copper plates with overglaze enamels.
  4. HELP! I screwed up my bisque firing and fired at cone 5 instead of 05. Major button pushing error. Can I still glaze my pieces and fire them at cone 5 again? Any suggestions of how to make the glaze stick to the bisque since it is so no porous? Thanks for any help.
  5. Hi, I am new to ceramic glazing. Are there any methods that can duplicate fire-based glazing on ceramics? I work at home, so i do not have access to kiln. I have read there are oven-based glazes and non-fire based glaze. How effective are they in terms of the glaze (will it be similar to fire glazed plate)? Thank You.
  6. Good day, I create ceramic pipes and have been having issues with the bowls / bottoms of the pipes encountering runny glaze. I fire mostly cone7to10 in my natural gas kiln and my problem has occurred most when I dip glaze for 3 seconds. I have spray glazed with greater success but it is cold outside where I spray and I want to stay warm inside. I do production so time is important which means brush glazing takes to long and should be out of the question. So do you have any tips on how to prevent my glazes from running and ruining my pipes? Less dip time? Deal with the cold? Face the long time of brushing? Or maybe dip the top half of the pipe and then the bottom half for 1second and brush the glaze in the bowl? To better understand the question and see my work you can visit ceramicsmokeware . com. Know that your time and replies are much appreciated. Thanks, James P
  7. I wash everything outside to keep clay from getting into my plumbing. I am going to start glazing and firing at home soon. Should I take the same precautions with cleaning up after glazing? Will glaze cause problems in the plumbing?
  8. I have a number of bisque fired ^10 clay pieces that I made during a class that used ^10 only. At home, I work with ^5 - ^6 clay, and glazes. Can I take my bisqued ^10 clay pieces, fire them in my kiln to ^ 9 or 10, (without glaze) and then glaze them with ^5 glaze and refire to ^5? I know this is an odd question, and it seems to me it would work in theory, just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on this? I no longer have access to ^10 glazes, and would rather not purchase some just for 6 things. Thanks, Linda
  9. Hello I've started tinkering with gold leaf and wax finishes for some street art tiles. They seem great at finishing fine detail and add a good pop of colour that you cant get with glazing. The fake gold leaf is super cheap these days I got 300 sheets in 3 colours for £5 on ebay, so seems rude not to. Being a complete newbie I would love to know other members experiences of using them and any hints and tips. Thanks in advance. Darran
  10. I've used CMC Gum but by the time the second coat dries the flaking has begun. The glaze consistency is just a little thinner than medium. I wet the tiles first and use a damp brush. What am I doing wrong?
  11. Hi all! I just got a couple ^5 pieces out of the kiln that I had glazed all over and used stilts. I know stilt marks are unavoidable and simply just a part of the process if glazing all over, but I was wondering if there was any way to make them look nicer? I used a dremel (probably not the right bit) to grind the marks down, but it made the high-gloss black look crappy and the product just looks sloppy now. I saw somewhere that someone used nail polish to touch up the marks, but I feel like that will also look sloppy. I was considering some sort of gloss spray but have never tried anything like that. Anyone have any tips/suggestions (besides telling me to not glaze all over)?
  12. I saw someone say that washing bisqueware before glazing can prevent dripping in the glaze fire because it makes it less absorbent when dipping in the glaze? Does anyone else do this? I'm worried it will make the glaze crawl or something weird.. Thoughts?
  13. Hi All! I am new to the Ceramic Arts Community! I made a few pieces both hand built and on the wheel with terracotta clay. I would like to glaze and fire my pieces in one fire with a clear matte finish. So my questions are... 1. Is it possible to skip the bisque fire and just glaze it and fire it once 2. What cone should I buy for my glaze? 3. Does anyone have any recommendations for clear matte glazes that would work for terracotta Thanks in advance!
  14. Happy Sunday to all, I have a bowl (a large one) that is slipped on the inside with a red mason stain slip. What would the effect, detrimental or otherwise be if I didn't glaze the inside? The bowl is functional and is cone 8 stoneware Thank you all
  15. Morning, I know you have a special raku kiln but is there a reason why you couldn't use an electric kiln?
  16. Hello Im a painter with a love for ceramic (and porcelain). I made several medium (20-40 cm tall) statues in clay (heads or human body) I fired them at a shop here in the Hague, Netherlands, where I live. There's something I just dont get (from books or videos I watched), regarding the glazing phase. Here's what Id like to know from someone who actually did this: 1) I can glaze the fired statue with a brush dipped in a glaze sollution, right? (Ive only seen videos of people diving the pottery in a glaze bath.) 2) once that glaze layer is dry, can I wrap the statue in paper/etc to transport it to the kiln? This kils is some 4 km away from where I live and I can only go there by bike... 3) I saw several videos or read some books that mention different temperatures of firing the glazed terracotta. Im not sure this shop will do different temps for me. They're a general art supply shop (for sculptors) which also have a kiln. Any advice is greatly appreciated.(please keep it simple, Im not an expert) I am still in the phase where I struggle with armatures for my statues, discovering which size is appropriate for what kind of detail. I have Phillipe Faraut books and 2 dvds but couldnt find this info there. Thanks a lot! Mon
  17. I am taking advanced ceramics courses at a University and need help organizing my thoughts/ideas/notes regarding glazes and glaze testing. I have searched the internet (research is NOT my strongest point) for some sort of chart/form that can help me keep detailed/thorough and consistent notes about my glaze testing. I have seen a program that will do this, but it is currently outside of my price-range Does anyone have or know where I could get something similar as a starting point. My memory stinks and have TOO MANY thoughts floating around in my head NOT TO do a detailed note-taking process. Also, I am attending college to become a teacher and would like to have something that helps my future students to keep track of recipes & results of glaze testing. Also, if there currently are not any, does anyone have ideas on the most important things to note in this chart. ​if I develop one, I will share it. thanks
  18. Hi! Does anyone know whether it is possible to attach porcelain to glass? I mean, attaching a small amount of glass to porcelain is easy, but can a little bit of porcelain be attached to a piece of glass? For example, can a drinking glass be covered with porcelain (lets say 0.5mm thick layer) and then fired? -Harry
  19. Apple Mug #1

    From the album Glaze Combinations

    Mug for a local apple merchant. The body glaze is Coyote Red/Gold with a small accent of Gun Metal Green on the rim. Best results are achieved by leaving the upper 1/4-1/2" unglazed and then dipping into the green. The apple embellishment is hand-painted: Mayco Caramel (Cone 05) - Coyote Really Red and whatever green I'm in the mood for! Clay is Laguna BMix5

    © Whistle Tree Pottery - Ellijay, GA 2015

  20. I'd like to paint the bottom of my pieces as I don't care for the bare clay look. however I'm firing to cone 5 so I cant use stilts. I've been using Amaco Velvet underglaze which works somewhat but I still get some kiln wash on the piece. any suggestions???
  21. Hi! I understood there are some very experienced ceramic artists here, so I decided to ask this question here. I have a problem. I have a thin porcelain wall and light goes through it easily. I want to totally block this light from going through with the most opaque glazing possible (still has to look good). I have tried different concentrations of tin oxide mixed into normal glazing (from 5% to 30%), but still some light passes through! Do you have any ideas? How would you make the most opaque glazing? Best regards, Harry the Potter
  22. Hello potters, I really appreciate all the information you share on this website and, as a not-so-experienced potter, I try to experiment in my studio. I'm about to take part in a fair and sell my stuff for the first time, and as I dont have enough time to experiment before this (2 weeks to go!) I would like to ask you: Is it possible to use vaseline instead of was resist in glazing? Does it leave any marks on the pots? I imagine it is not a very friendly material to burn, but I may not have time to search for wax (i havent found it yet here in São Paulo - Brazil) and Im planning on cleaning most of the vaseline after glazing. Do you think it is a good idea? Thanks!
  23. I am making a rather large, slightly curved bullnose. I will need to glaze one end of it. Since it is large (12 "x10") I fire resting on the shelf. But I'll need to glaze one long end of it. What is the best way to support this so not to glaze it to the kiln shelf? Thanks. Linda
  24. workshop

    From the album Our Workshop

  25. Hello, I am using AMACO glazes for the first time, and I need some kind advice. AMACO site shows wonderful effects when two layers of different glazes are used. I coated (brushed) the bottom part of one cup with three layers of PC20 and the second one with three layers of PC23, and trailed the top parts of each cup with three layers of PC53 with small overlap. According to the site info, I had to fire it once at 2195 deg.F with long down-fire. I programmed my kiln for 15 minutes exposure at 2195 deg.F with further down fire to 2012 deg.F for 60 min., followed by 5 minutes exposure and further cooling to 1900 deg.F within 60 min., followed by 5 min.exposure. I was not happy with the result, the colors were different from those at the AMACO site (dirty brown/yellow colors appeared in the overlap area and PC53 became unsmooth). Photographs of expected and my results are attached - the bowl is from AMACO site and the teacups are mine. Could you please advise my mistakes in applying AMACO glazes/selection of firing program? Many thanks in advance, Pavel
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