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Found 209 results

  1. Hi all, I'm wanting to make a low-fire matt or satin transparent glaze. Have any of you got a simple recipe? Thank you in advance.
  2. So I’m new to getting glazing figured out. And I got really thrown off by the “whole milk consistency” rule I kept hearing about mixing glaze. And subsequently, I have seen correctly mixed glazed and I don’t think those people know what whole milk looks like.. so long story short, I got WAY too much water in my glazed and I’m trying to salvage them. I spoke with a person at the closest pottery store and they suggested I add APT-II or brushing medium to thicken them up. I added the APT and it did thicken them up some. They were at varying degrees of watery. I gave up and dumped the worst ones. I’m only working in pints right now so it wasn’t that big of a loss. But I’m still working on the rest which still aren’t quite there. I have 2 questions: 1. My brushing medium says mix 1 tsp to 1lb of dry glaze. My glaze is already mixed and not dry. I read that I should add 1-2 tsp to a gallon of warm water and let set for 24 hrs. My questions is why does it need to be a gallon? I don’t know if they are saying to make a whole gallon and just use that water when you are first mixing your glaze or add it to your mixed glaze. Can I just disolve a 1/2tsp of the medium in a little water and add it to my mixed watery glaze? 2. Do you have a better idea? Is there another way to thicken these up or should I scrap it all and start over? I have about 8 different messed up glazed. I apologive for my naïveté. The pottery store in my area is closed for another 3 days and I’d like to get this show on the road so I’m turning to you guys. You have been very helpful in the past. Thank you!
  3. I need to find the best All-In-One clay for cone 5, great for both hand building and wheel throwing I know. That's a tall order. But I can dream. I have a pug mill and don't want 2 bodies. Problem: I have too many problems with my gas kiln for cone 06 anymore. I'm DONE. I am moving to cone 5. Criteria / Factors: I'm in Southern California I teach 180 high school students grades 9-12, all levels of art skills, so it has to take punishment Not too sandy on the wheel, not too smooth or squishy for hand building Not too dense so it is so top-heavy when trimming I'm willing to pug the new clay to soften it for throwing, if it is stiff and great for hand building, or visa versa Doesn't stain clothes or the tables, rolling pins, or make a mess everywhere Is not pure white (students can't see where they missed glazing spots when using light color glazes - painting) Good leather hard, doesn't soften up too easily when re-wetting to score things together Doesn't take every indentation to the surface of pieces, temperamentalD Centers on the wheel fairly easily, especially for teen girls with tiny hands Can take a good amount of water from beginners Pulling walls, it is strong, doesn't warp or sag easily Won't dry out too quickly in hands while hand building Doesn't bend or warp easily when removing from the wheel Not so soft that it caves when cutting and sliding off the wheel Doesn't make teens hate the class because it stains clothes or gets everywhere and of course, takes glazes well and can handle a little fluctuation in gas environments Cone 5 clays I've Tried: Laguna - Dover White: Nice clay, but pure white. easy to center, but A little soft when hand building Laguna - Plain (Buff): Nice light tan color, easy center and to rehydrate if repairing, but a bit too squishy and shows every dent Laguna - Moroccan Sand: I love this clay, doesn't leave residue - color, but a bit dense to center. It is really dark grayish brown, if they only could lighten it Laguna - Buff with Sand: Nice tan color, but WAY too sandy for students on the wheel Laguna - Greystone: Too dense and top heavy for small pieces, hard to center, but really takes a beating with water, warps when thin due to density of surrounding clay Laguna - Speckled Buff: A bit dark in color, has iron so it gets read everywhere, could stain (think girls with pure white vans) Laguna - LB-6: hmmm, can't remember, but nixed it very soon after Laguna - Sante Fe: OMG - red EVERYWHERE, like a crime scene Aardvark Clay - SBF - Too dark tan - a bit sticky for students Aardvark Clay -Arctic White: Too white Opinions???? Go!!!
  4. I hand-mix a transparent glaze, which I've used for the last year continuously with great success. The last two times I've glaze-fired, TONS of little bumps appeared, a few of them up to a cm wide (those ones looks a little more like an air bubble in the clay. The clay is white and the glaze is clear, but the bubbles that are appearing are white (so it looks like the glaze has fused to the clay body and pulled it out into bumps/bubbles. Please see the attached photo- this is what all my pieces came out like. I thought my glaze might have been contaminated so I mixed a whole new batch but the same thing happened. The only other thing I can think of that might be different is that it's more humid in the studio because it's the middle of summer. Please help! I'm getting so delayed on my orders because I keep having to re-make everything and I'm freaking out! Should I try re-firing the pieces and doing something differently, like holding it a bit? I fire my bisque to cone 06, and the glaze to cone 6. The kiln sometimes runs a little on the hot side, but I haven't found that to cause this particular problem before. I use PSH cone 6 white stoneware #519. My glaze recipe is: 25% epk, 25% silica, 10% wollastonite, 25% frit 3134, 15% feldspar minspar. Thanks in advance!
  5. Hi, My understanding of gum arabic is it helps with the application of glazes when brushing them on - is that correct? My glazes to date have all been good but I find that when they dry they turn quite powdery, which compared to some of the commercial glazes, is quite significant. So before a firing I have to be really cautious about how I handle them so as to not leave spots where I've removed the glaze with my hands. Will adding gum arabic help with this? Another issue that I've found is that when brushing on the glazes in layers, some of the 'base' layers underneath are removed at the same time, so the final fired vessel looks quite patchy. This also seems to be less of an issue compared with some of the commercial glazes. Again, as far as I can tell from other forums, this seems to resolve the issue. One last thing - Does anyone know what the ratio of gum arabic is to water when mixing it with raw materials? Thanks in advance for any advice! Thanks, Carl
  6. Dear everyone, I am quite new to a slip casting technique. Have made several plaster molds for casting porcelain. And had some success, but recently I have noticed that some of the greenware gets tiny pinholes and then, (because some cups doesnt have it) there are SOMETIMES also pinholes on the glaze. If i got it right, those tiny pinholes are the result of air bubbles or pieces of dust in the casting slip, right? But i wonder, do those pinholes influence the glaze? I am a bit confused, because some of the porcelain cups are not having those pinholes on the glaze and some do have. The thing is that the kiln in the studio where i used to fire my work is very old, and as a kiln technician said, it fires hire than it should and moreover fires unevenly. I wonder if this could be the reason for the pinholes on the glaze surface? Or maybe pinholes on the greenware? Or both? Do you have any ideas? Or similar experience? Thank you in advance!!
  7. Carl_and16

    Glaze Troubles

    Hello, So I've mixed a few of my own glazes. Some of them are more stable than others but I always fire to cone 6 and use a pretty standard stoneware. I'm finding that some glazes run more than others. Is there any additives than be used to stop this from happening? I've done a bit of research and it looks like gum arabic can help? Also, does anyone know what the ratio is when mixing gum arabic with water (that's assuming the GA will help to stop the glaze running). Thanks in advance for any advice given! Carl
  8. Oops, I am a new potter and accidentally used Custer Feldspan instead of Soda Feldspar. What should I do? Thanks! cone 6 2000g Batch Gerstley Borate 634g Flint (Silica) 594g *asked for Soda Feldstar used Custer Feldspan 396g Talc 277g EPK 99g
  9. Eastwood Pottery

    Hannahs Blue Fake Ash Glaze

    I am new to the community. My website is Eastwood Pottery I have a question regarding Hannah's Fake Blue Ash glaze. My glaze always comes out brown. I left out the RIO and just used the Cobalt Oxide but I still for the life of me cannot get blue. Does anyone out there have success using the blue ash glaze and do you use cobalt oxide as in the recipe?
  10. Hi folks, Today I was working on the Wedding Jar that I had made for a nephew, and was trying to accent their lettering for names and dates. I had stamped these in, but it was not quite clear so I cleaned them up and added a stain over top thinking to do a little mishima to bring the letters up. However, due to the curved surface I lost some of the letter forms. What to do. I used a small brush after engraving the missing areas to flow the glaze in, and that worked. At the same time I decided to use the brush with a white engobe to accent the flowers of the mountain laurel I had stamped into the form. My tip for the day though is much simpler. I had problems with getting the right amount of slip or stain on to the fine bristled brush. I tried a lot of different techniques and then tried to dip a sponge brush into the container of slip or stain and lay it over the top of the container loading the brush up from that. It worked perfectly with just the right amount of stain or slip to work into the brush and keep the fine work when painting on the pot. I was an art teacher, working with a lot of media, especially watercolor, acrylic, and inks. This technique I had never heard of, but it would work well with almost any media to keep from overloading a brush. So. . .. do any of you have some technique that would work well with the use of stains, underglazes, glazes, even if brushing, spraying, or other technique? Post it here, it would be great to hear from you. best, Pres
  11. My friend and I recently bought a used kiln and wheel. Our first test with the kiln we messed up and fired our stuff to cone 6 (instead of 06). We hadn't had a lot in the kiln, just a few really small cut-out pieces. It took about 6.5 hours to get close to cone 6, but the large 6 cone didn't fully drop, and the cone 7 didn't really move much, so we weren't totally sure if it was fully done. Moving on to our second fire. We had new things to fire, so we bisque fired our stuff (half full with things stacked) to cone 06 this time. Our cone sitter fell out when we closed it (not sure exactly what happened), so after 6.5 hours, we stopped it. We again weren't 100% sure if things we underfired, overfired, or totally perfect. We tried the "lick" test and it was sticking to our tongue. We decided to glaze it and fire to completion. This time, our kiln was full. We didn't put anything on our bottom level (we were worried out glaze would run and it would ruin the kiln). We put in a cone 7 sitter (to make sure it fired completely to cone 6) and we had our large cones to watch at the top and bottom of our kiln. After almost 11 hours, it still wasn't complete (and it was 1am) so we turned it off and left it. So now I'm left with a million questions. 1) How can I tell if it is completely fired? 2) Can I re-fire the stuff and would I have to fire it from start, another 12+ hours? 3) I've read a million posts talking about different kiln lengths, but I'm wondering how exactly you can tell how long it would take? 4) I think our bottom heat isn't as strong as our tops, so should I be putting thinner stuff at the bottom? Or just get the heaters fixed? 5) If our bisque fire wasn't fully fired, would that make our glaze fire take longer? Thanks so much for any help! Already this website has been a huge help for my friend and I. We basically use this as a pottery bible. UPDATE!! We re-fired our glaze and this time everything went off after 8 hours. The glaze is a little runny, but our main concern is the bottom elements not being the best. We had our thin stuff at the bottom, and it did glaze over, but the cones didn't change at all. The top cones did, though!
  12. Hi everyone, I did try and find a solution but only came up with how to change the glaze composition. I have two urn which I just fired and both have crazing. I checked thick6of the glaze and all seemed fine. It's stoneware fired to 1200°C with 20 min hold. I've had problems making these pieces and it's taken me 8 months due to health issues and trying different forms for the request. Can I refire and hope that the glaze will smooth out or touch up with glaze and refire? Solutions would be much appreciated. Many thanks Andrea
  13. Hi, I am trying to glaze some logo mugs (mugs with logo plaques/medallions that have company logos/words on them) and want to get some advice on the best way to make the words/shapes on the plaques show up. I am wondering if I should use a combination of iron oxide and a clear glaze to accent the words/shapes in black iron oxide and the clear glaze on the rest of the medallion/plaque? The rest of the mug will be dipped in another glaze. I am using speckled brownstone clay, cone 6 glaze firing, and glazes made in-house. Thank you for your advice!
  14. When I was taking ceramic classes my teacher used some tool to rub on the sharp glaze edges that would rub the broken bubbles down so you did not get hurt. I seem to keep thinking it was made from cement. Anyone know what this is or if this is what it is?
  15. hello i'm sima from iran and i am a beginner i really want to learn about the techniques that are used to make these products. hope you could help me learn more. if you know any resources leet me know
  16. I have this heavy blisters and pinholes issue and I m doing the Bisque at cone 08 and glaze temperature is at cone 6 + 40 mins soak., Whats the reason behind this blisters and pinholes ? Is it a clay issue or its something to do with a glaze chemistry ?
  17. BornonSunsetCeramics

    Reglaze tips needed!

    Just a quick question about re-firing work. I wasn't happy with some details around a logo that I carved in to my pieces so I've fixed them with glaze (and also filled a few pinholes) - my question is whether or not I need to be as meticulous about dust and fingerprints on these like you do with glaze on bisque. I had to hold them firmly and work slowly to fix my glaze errors from the past firing. I'm feeling like that stuff (oil from my hands, dust) will burn off before the glaze melts again since its technically laying over top of a hardened/fired glaze and not absorbing into un-fired glaze... thoughts? Thanks so much, friends!
  18. Malinda

    Glaze Defect

    This is once-fired glaze @ 900 Celsius. How I eliminate that defect???
  19. Sheryl Leigh

    Celadon - Application?

    Hi all! First off, my apologies if this is in the wrong section. I'm new to Celadons (are all transparent glazes Celadon?). I have yet to have a piece where the celadon is a uniform consistency, even on the flat areas (I'm aware that it should be darker for contrast in carving, etc.). Either drips show up or there is a slight unevenness. Is this just something you have to deal with in using these glazes or am I missing something in application? Some of the glazes I'm using are bought, one (Ms. Selsor's faux celadon )was mixed by me. Any help is appreciated!
  20. Hi everyone, A question. Can anyone see a problem with not glazing over underglaze for non food works? I have looked but can't find an answer anywhere and it seems that everyone uses a glaze over the top for the underglazes. I'm using porcelain clay to make wearable works including rings (I should add). I love the results, and the undergalzes adhere very well to the porcelain. I can even wet sand after the final fire and the design stays put. The colours appear somewhat softer but that is good too. I belive that the newer underglazes have more frit in them making them a litle more like a glaze themselves and this is why they work differntly to older style glazes.? Any issues? I can do it but is it a bad idea as far as safely goes? cheers Lilly aka etched
  21. I'm going to have pots in a once/year wood firing. Ben Bates Oribe Green Cone 9-13 was given in a CM this past year and looks very interesting but I am wondering with 6% Copper carbonate if it would be food safe fired between cone 10 - 12? recipe is: Bone ash 2% Talc 9% Whiting 23% Custer feldspar 31% EPK 11% Silica 24% add: Copper Carb 6% Thanks for any help you can offer.
  22. Hello! New to the site and am curious about the effects of dry wood ash on glazes. I have found a lot of info about wood ash glazes, but not so much about applying dry wood ash onto an already applied and dried (or sometimes sprayed with a little water) glaze. I realize glaze recipes will vary greatly so it may not be very helpful to name any, but I have had great results (in my opinion) with the shino glaze at the pottery school I attend, please see the attached image. I have also tried this on our versions of tenmoku and iron red with results of some fluxing and gold speckling, respectively. So I suppose my question is what is it in shino glaze that reacts that way with the "freckling", for the lack of a more accurate term? (Perhaps this is carbon trapping? I do experiment with a CTC shino as well.) I'd like to experiment with other glazes and colors, but am curious to know if there is a specific ingredient (or more than one) that I should look for to possibly gauge what the results may be with applied dry wood ash. Has anyone tried this on, say, a standard celadon or spodumene glaze, if there are such things? Yes, I am about to do some test tiles, but this will take weeks for results (I am a student so at the mercy of their schedule) so any insight would be greatly appreciated as I could completely avoid any glazes that would have undesirable effect. Thank you so much. Stephen
  23. Hi, I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts on this effect: website is here: http://www.mostra-moustiers.com/fr/galerie-la-mostra/aire-goutt-allikmets.php Is this a look achieved through a glaze that cracks/crazes excessively, or what else is happening here?! I've seen a few vessels with this type of effect recently and I think it looks great, but how exactly is it done?!
  24. Hi, does anyone have any advice on how to ensure a glaze is food safe and doesn't leach anything harmful? I know that it's possible to send samples off to get tested, but for a hobby potter this is not too useful since even if I know that one batch is OK, I can't adequately ensure that I'll meet exactly the same conditions for a subsequent batch and I can't keep sending stuff off for testing, it would get too expensive. So far I've just avoided the problem by only making ornamental ware, but it would be quite nice to make a few mugs that could be used at home. Are there any glazes that simply don't have anything harmful in them, so that even if they leach they are not going to make anyone ill?!
  25. Hello everyone! I am stumped on this issue and was wondering if anyone had any insight or advice on this. We opened our soda kiln a couple weeks ago and I had a problem with my work. I fired 64 pcs, most of which was Rods Bod clay body which also had some Red Iron Oxide slip decoration on it. I used Penn State Shino that I mixed the day that I glazed. 60% of it had major shivering! The glaze was just crumbling off and some thicker areas coming off in large pieces, leaving a grey stony finish behind. Such a bummer! See video here: https://youtu.be/0cbd0eXvYII Some things to note in this firing: - No one else's work shivered, but no one else used Rods bod or PSS Shino. - Pieces from previous firing that didn't make it in kiln and fired this time were ALL okay. They had been sitting for 6 wks and were Rods Bod with RIO decoration and PSS glaze. - I fired over two dozen spoons with Takamori clay body and PSS glaze, and NONE of them shivered. There was some crazing. - All my Rods Bod pcs with SF Shino or other glazes did not shiver. - 5 sake cups that fired cold didn't shiver. - There was crazing on several pieces. - Areas that got hit with a lot of soda on Rods Bod/PSS would shiver. - I did rush the drying process of Rods bod, drying in the sun and did a 2 hour pre-heat when I bisqued. I never had a shivering problem with Rods Bod and PSS glaze until the last two firings, which make me wonder if it's a clay body issue, a combo of clay body and glaze fit, or something happened in the glaze mixture. Or could it be the soda ash? I did find a discrepancy in our PSS recipe vs. the one from Liz Willoughby when I double checked today; we use 4.9 OM4 amount instead of her 14.9 OM4 amt, and I wonder if that makes a difference in anything. SODA ASH SPRAY RECIPE 1 lb soda ash to 1/2 gal water PENN STATE SHINO RECIPE - LIZ WILLOUGHBY 14.6 Neph Synite 7.8 Soda ash (light) 9.7 EPK 4.9 OM4 34.0 F4 feldspar 29.0 Spodumene
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