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Found 5 results

  1. This 2-day workshop will explore an array of leatherhard and bisqueware decorative options to enhance your pottery surface. Demonstrations are divided into two sections: pre and post firing. Initial explorations will begin in the green-ware stage to include the use of slip, slip trailing, sprigging, as well as trimming. In the bisqueware portion, glaze strategies will be investigated with trailing and waxing techniques demonstrated. Upon the completion of this workshop you will be armed with a variety of skills to apply towards your future pottery practice. Participants will have the opportunity to employ these ideas through their own work during both days. Please bring a sketchbook, personal potting tools, assorted brushes and any reference material you would like to incorporate in your work (photos, drawings, etc.) Bio Ryan J. Greenheck received his Master of Fine Arts degree from SUNY College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2004. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree as well as a Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Wisconsin-Stout in 2002. He has participated in numerous national juried exhibitions and shows since 2000. His work is represented in many galleries throughout the country. Ryan currently is a practicing studio potter and Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. WS01 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, January 16 & 17, 2016 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  2. Actually what she said was;"Your mugs are TOO BIG.'She said it about three times. She said;"You can't even see the bottom of them." I ignored her. The mugs were walking off the shelves. People requested a bigger size mug. They are one pound. A regular size, not too huge. Why do people come into my studio and feel that it is O.K. to complain, to criticize, to find fault? Why didn't she say;"Your eyes are too blue? Or your hair is too wavy?" I am not going to change my work for her. Why say anything if you can't be positive? Do you have a sales experience where the person felt it was O.K to find fault? Let's here your stories. Try to err on the positive side if possible. TJR.
  3. Mark Shapiro Workshop – Teapots: Brew / Pour / More WS01 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, January 17 & 18, 2015 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member For the potter, teapots are entrancing objects to make. They have a long and rich history that evokes social rituals and intercultural connections. They have long been collected and displayed, and ceramic teapots remain the first choice for brewing tea. They are still commonly used, though other ceramic forms have been replaced by other kinds of vessels. Technically teapots present the challenge of designing and integrating multiple parts—spout, lid, handle, foot, knob—in addition to the usual questions of clay, surface, and firing. As such, the teapot is a classic potter’s performance, in which the drama of ceramic inspiration and mastery unfolds. A functional teapot must successfully brew and pour tea, but what else can a teapot do? In this 2-day workshop participants will look at the parts that make the whole, focusing on ergonomics, proportion, and the harmony of elements. What makes a great teapot, one that you want to use again and again? This workshop will attempt to unfold some of those qualities by learning from outstanding examples and thinking about how to capture such excellence in our own teapots and related wares. Mark Shapiro makes wood-fired pots in Western Massachusetts. He is a frequent workshop leader, lecturer, curator, panelist, and writer, and is mentor to a half-dozen apprentices who have trained at his Stonepool Pottery. His work was featured in the 4th World Ceramics Biennial in Icheon, Korea, and is in many public collections. His interviews of Karen Karnes, Michael Simon, Paulus Berensohn, and Sergei Isupov, are in the Smithsonian Archives of American Art and he edited A Chosen Path: the Ceramic Art of Karen Karnes (UNC Press). He is on the advisory board of Ceramics Monthly, and is a contributing editor to Studio Potter Magazine. WS01 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, January 17 & 18, 2015 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209
  4. Bryan Hopkins: Porcelain Vessels from Function to Dysfunction WS03 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, August 16 & 17, 2014 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member In this hands-on workshop participants will push their creative limits, as well as the physical limits of porcelain. Porcelain will be used and exploited for its unique and amazing plastic and fired qualities. Bryan will demonstrate his methods for combining wheel-thrown elements to create unique utilitarian forms and vessels. Participants will investigate a range of surface textures and construction methods through the use of bisque molds, x-Acto knives, wood carving tools and water etching. These surface enhancements will be employed to create new dimensions on the forms while emphasizing the translucent beauty of porcelain. The workshop will offer a balance of instructor demonstration, image presentation, one-on-one attention and student work time to explore avenues. This course is open to both wheel-workers and hand-builders and requires a basic working knowledge of clay coupled with a willingness to explore new ideas before enrolling. Bryan Hopkins was born in Philadelphia, PA. He was a mathematics major at West Chester University when he took his first ceramics class. Bryan went on to earn an MFA in Ceramics from the State University of New York at New Paltz. Bryan has been a studio potter working in porcelain since 1990, and has lived in Buffalo, NY, since 1995. Bryan works as Adjunct Professor of Ceramics and 3-D Design for Niagara County Community College, and has also taught at Medaille College, SUNY at New Paltz, and SUNY at Fredonia. Bryan’s work has been exhibited in group and solo shows nationally, including the NCECA Clay National Biennial (2005 & 2009), the Craft Guild of Dallas, TX, MudFire Clayworks in Decatur, GA and SOFA Chicago and his work has been published in Ceramics Monthly, Ceramics: Art and Perception, Studio Potter, 500 Vases, and Best of 500 Ceramics. Bryan is a founding participant in Objective Clay, a diverse on-line craft forum sharing ideas and new work from 14 utilitarian ceramic artists. Learn more about Bryan’s work and process at www.hopkinspottery.com WS03 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, August 16 & 17, 2014 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  5. Jack Troy – Pottery Forms: Intention and Happenstance WS05 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 9 & 10 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member This 2-day demonstration/discussion workshop includes presentations on Japanese teabowls as well as both contemporary and historic pots to help enlarge our approach to our persoanl work and emphasize the evolution of personal forms — pots with a unique identity. Using the cup as a take-off point, Jack will demonstrate how the cup reflects a concern for functional and aesthetic values, including surface decoration, tactile qualities, inside-outside considerations, spontaneity and control, as well as focusing attention on the cup as a whole: weight, lip, foot, body, handle. Thrown cups will be altered by faceting, carving, paddling, stamping and heavy slip application. His most recent, tactile, sculptural teabowls are altered significantly from thrown components. Jack will demonstrate extending the scale of work, and will apply a variety of altering techniques to thrown forms while addressing how and why some pieces are made specifically to be fired with wood. Pitchers, jars, and bowls of various scales with be thrown and altered, befriending asymmetry. Jack Troy's anecdotal style of information-sharing covers a wide range of topics, including technical and aesthetic issues in ceramics, personal goals, and the dilemma of being a literate potter while knowing that most of the world's best pots were made by people who couldn't read, write, or do glaze calculation. The aim of the workshop will be to meet each other and exchange ideas that help extend our personal knowledge of forming and firing so the choices we make about our work might enliven the clay we use. Participants are asked to bring with them 2 pots “lived with over time†– one made by the individual and one by someone else – to illustrate two types of “meaning†with regard to how a piece convey’s significance to us. 2013 is Jack Troy’s 51tst year of making pots. During the past year he fired 11 different kilns, including the anagama at Golden Bridge Pottery, in Pondicherry, India, in February 2013, where he taught his 230th workshop. Other events include workshops in Washington State, at Fern Hill Pottery, Brush Prairie; and Shoreline Community College, Seattle. In Maine, he held a Residency at Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, judged the 2012 Strictly Functional Pottery National exhibition, and received the 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award from the National Council for Education in the Ceramic Arts (NCECA). His education in ceramics has included trips to 26 countries. Having published over 80 articles in ceramics publications, he also wrote Salt Glazed Ceramics, Woodfired Stoneware and Porcelain, and Calling the Planet Home, [poems]. His work has been exhibited widely, and is in numerous collections, public and private. He has said, “I made my first pot - a wretched little bowl with a pitted glaze - in November, 1962. This simple act changed my life, leading me to believe, 51 years later, that potters may change the world for the better, one handful at a time. “We potters finish our work, but only others can complete it, through use. Pottery, then, is only finished once, but can be completed endlessly, by a succession of users, keeping it active in a variety of settings.†WS05 - Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 9 & 10 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Register on-line or contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
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