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Found 5 results

  1. Hi, does anyone have any advice on how to ensure a glaze is food safe and doesn't leach anything harmful? I know that it's possible to send samples off to get tested, but for a hobby potter this is not too useful since even if I know that one batch is OK, I can't adequately ensure that I'll meet exactly the same conditions for a subsequent batch and I can't keep sending stuff off for testing, it would get too expensive. So far I've just avoided the problem by only making ornamental ware, but it would be quite nice to make a few mugs that could be used at home. Are there any glazes that simply don't have anything harmful in them, so that even if they leach they are not going to make anyone ill?!
  2. When a manufacturer states that a specific line of glazes is 100% mixable, and that each of these glazes is food safe on its own, can I assume that means that if I layer or mix colors in the same line the glaze is still food safe? Applied and fired according to their instructions of course. I'm really agonizing over glaze safety and no, I don't want to make my own glaze. The prevailing wisdom, and what the manufacturer's say, seems to be that once different food safe glazes come in contact with eachother, all bets are off as to the food safety of that glaze. This makes sense to me, but I'm seeing all sorts of combining going on in utilitarian ware. Beautiful combining. I don't think everyone is sending their stuff off to the lab for testing. Or maybe I'm wrong. At this point I'm using single glazes anywhere food touches. I'd appreciate any guidance and suggestions. Thanks Irene, trying hard not to contaminate anyone or make any enemies
  3. Dear esteemed Ceramic Artists, I am a novice potter with a history in painting. I live in Brazil where supplies are very expensive and I am operating on a budget. I have a friend visiting from the States and I would like her to bring me some glazes. My question is this: I will be using a low fire kiln and want to get a good range of glazes to make foodsafe pieces. I want to be able to mix colours and paint images with glaze -(it has been suggested I get majolica style glazes to be able to paint on the pieces and see the results). I have been trying to understand the terms and the huge variety of products out there and that brings me to you... for example, AMACO has a series of glazes called Teacher's Pallet which suggests that you could mix their red with yellow and achieve an orange. I want to be able to see what I am painting and I want the colour on the unfired piece to look the same when I fire it. I would appreciate any advice that would help me put together a "beginner's kit" that would allow me to mix and create a full spectrum of colours. What products or manufacturers could you suggest for me? Thank you VERY much for your time.
  4. Hi all, I'm taking a ceramics class and our teacher provided us with ^06 clay. I didn't realize how low-fire that was until it was too late to start my project over...in fact, she had told us that it was ^6 not ^06. I'm a little concerned as I am making a teapot and don't think I will be able to glaze inside the spout, and have read that unglazed areas of low-fire clay are fairly porous and are not generally considered foodsafe. Should I be concerned that the teapot I spent hours and hours on might not be safe to actually use? Any ideas for how to properly glaze the inside of the pour spout? Thanks!
  5. Hello! I'm not sure if this is the right forum or web site for this question, but... I have an old bone china tea set (c. 1920) whose tea pot has some worn gold gilding, both on the edge and on the outside decorative pattern. Is any repair possible? Are gilding pens or paints food safe? Would I be trashing the value of the tea pot? Thanks for any advice or thoughts...
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