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Found 17 results

  1. So, ive created this account specifically for help! ive been given two very old electric kilns, seems to be from the 70s perhaps? anyways, one is an American Beauty electric kiln model number: AB18 this thing has four switches and a kiln sitter. seems to be in relatively good condition from what my ceramic instructor had said. Problem is ive never fired a kiln and there is almost zero information on the kilns manual or even the company that produced the kiln. I find that almost unbelievable seeing as I live 5 miles from the city the kiln company was located. If anyone has any further information of this specific model of kiln that would help immensely !! Next, I have a Cress electric kiln model number : B-23-HB ive found an online manual for the company kilns but they're all for up-to-date kilns.. This model has a upper and lower nobs for high and low firing. anyone have any ideas because im totally fresh to anything in regards to firing kilns. is it worth keeping or should I try to get a more updated kiln? Help! thank you in advance!
  2. Since day 1 I wanted to do wood firing. I started with an electric kiln and although it is possible to do interesting things I'm still focused on ultimately doing Anagama. I cant truly test Cone 10 glazes in my electric and want to get as close to possible to that environment, which means a way to do reduction, neutral and oxidation. So I got a broke down Duncan kiln donated to me and the burner came in today so I'm super excited!!! Stripping it down tonight and getting the elements out then will figure out how to cut the burner port and the top opening. Then I have to find a 40 - 50 gallon tank. Gaaaaaaah excited! df
  3. Hi all, I'm hoping someone can give some technical tips on repairing my Cromartie Hobbycraft kiln with controller and which is not hard wired but runs off a 13 amp plug. It is a top loader. Bought as a used kiln, I have been using this quite happily for a number of years until recently where it has stopped reaching a stoneware glaze firing of 1240C. I have replaced the elements and ceramic insulators, checked and cleaned up all the connections and tightened the belts around the body and lid. I have also changed the electrical lead from a short one which fitted into a socket not on the main circuit to a longer lead, about 5-6 meters, to reach a socket on the main circuit as I understand it can cope better with the energy required. I wondered if it makes a difference that the lead is much longer than the original which was no more than 2 meters. Any advice or tips will be very gratefully received. Thanks Kathy
  4. Hey everyone! I'm in the process of creating a home studio, and I thought it would be a great idea to start making my own glazes. What are some good resources, magazines, or books that have helped you guys when it comes to introductory to advanced glaze making? Also, are there any tips or suggestions when I'm starting out! Thank you so much and any input would be greatly appreciated.
  5. dazzlepottery

    Propping Kiln Lid

    When I am firing my electric kiln, I start with the lid propped open about 2 inches and the top peephole out. Then at around 1000 degrees F I shut the lid. The top peephole is open the whole time. I understand that the lid needs to be propped to allow moisture and gasses to escape in the early stages of firing. My questions are: 1) is 1000F an appropriate temp to close the lid? 2) Is it necessary to prop the lid on a ^6 glaze firing as well as the bisque, or only during the bisque (^06) I have been firing this way for a couple years and the pots always come out well. However the lid has badly cracked on both the inside and outside, necessitating repair with kiln cement. I have a large electric Skutt Kiln (I think it's the 1227). Even with my repair, it is all fractured and occasionally falls onto the pots below. The metal handle is also badly rusted and corroded, an issue I didn't notice when I bought this kiln used a couple years ago. I notice when I close the lid on an 1000F kiln it makes a soft settling crackling noise. I am curious if the cracking lid is from thermal shock when it goes from hot room temp to 1000F. Because of this, i wonder if it's better not to close it so late (and hot) in the firing. Perhaps it's just time for an envirovent. Is it normal for a lid to start to deteriorate like this? The newer versions of my kiln are made with the hydraulic lid lifter, which I assume lifts it more evenly, without the torque from supporting it on just one part. Please let me know if anyone else has had this cracking lid issue. -Dana
  6. jothamhung

    Cress Fx27P Help

    Hey everyone! I recently purchased a used Cress FX27P Electric Kiln, and after bisque firing the first time with the automatic kiln sitter, I noticed that the thumbwheel does not move, and appears to have some sort of malfunction. I figured out a way to bisque firing while moving the thumbwheel manually, but I haven't tried glaze firing yet. Anybody owns this kiln or a similar version of this kiln and can help with how I can glaze fire (cone 6) by moving the thumbwheel myself? For everyone that doesn't know what the purpose of the thumbwheel is, there are numbers 0 to 10 on it, and it moves gradually by itself during a firing. 0 being no power to the elements, and 10 being maximum power to the elements. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.
  7. PotterPutter

    Outdoor Electric Kiln

    Hi everyone! New potter here - nothing like taking up a new hobby at 45. Wish I had done this 20 years ago. I have a wheel at home, and the center where I take classes will fire pieces I throw at home as long as I am enrolled in a class, buy clay from them and use their glazes. The people are awesome and my pieces are always fired perfectly. It's a GREAT situation - my only complaint is that since I work full-time and the school is about a 25 minute drive from my house, dropping off and picking up is a hassle, not to mention class time eats up a large part of my day off. There is never enough time, is there? I have started selling my work on Etsy, and it's moving pretty well. Long term, this could be an additional source of income, or just a hobby. Either way, I love it and plan to do it for a long time. So, the point of my post: I am tinkering with the idea of buying an electric kiln at the beginning of the year - probably a small-ish one, < 3 cubic feet. I live in a house, but do not have a garage, basement, covered/screened porch or room in the house where I can realistically put a kiln. I am thinking about building a weatherproof steel "shed" to put on my patio, maybe 4' x 4' x 4' - enough to give the kiln 12 inches on all sides and room to raise the lid, without being too obtrusive even though the patio is fairly large. The box would have doors for access and the lid of the storage shed/box will lift up too. I have the electrical worked out and have room for a 240v line. I know condensation and corrosion of non-stainless parts is an issue, but other than that what else do I need to consider? If the box has rain-proof vents, could I run the kiln with the doors closed in case of a surprise rain shower, which pop up all summer long in Atlanta? Or do the doors always need to be open? The yard is fenced, so I'm not worried about random children wandering up and touching it. I have seen people say 'electric' and 'outdoors' don't mix, but we have an electric smoker on the patio that just has a plastic cover on it and it works fine after 3 years. A kiln is a lot more expensive and complicated though, so I want to really do my homework here. Just looking for some feedback, suggestions, experiences with outdoor electric kilns, or even why this is a terrible idea and I should just forget about it. But mostly, I'd like advice on how to make this work, if possible. Thanks!
  8. firenflux

    butterfly bowl stack

    From the album: Favorites

    Set of butterfly bowls I just finished. I'm fairly pleased with how they came out even though they were over fired.
  9. GiselleNo5

    Detail of Poppy Bowl

    From the album: Pottery 2016

    Cone 5 B-Mix, carved and glazed in Stoned Denim from Mayco.

    © Giselle Massey 2016 all rights reserved

  10. Hi, I'm looking for a used kiln. Hopefully a Skutt or an L&L. I'm looking for a programmable one that will fire to cone 10, although I plan to fire to cone 5. (It's nice to have the option.) My question is, what should I look for when I actually get to see one in person? What am I looking for concerning the elements or control panels? Is there a way to test it without doing a full firing? Thanks!
  11. I recently bought an Econo j236 kiln for next to nothing complete with the kiln sitter. It's from before 1997, the woman wasn't sure exactly when. I haven't run it just yet, but does anyone have any tips or tricks to using this specific kiln or any other of the j models? I found the instructions online, but I think it's always better to hear real life experiences with it!
  12. Ugh, just UGH! I had a huge load to fire for a very important community project. Using a Cone 4-6 stoneware and Cone 4-6 glaze. Normally I fire to cone 5 and let it soak for 5 minutes. The kiln was almost to temp when I left for work this morning. (yes, I know, never leave a kiln, but I couldn't be late to work and the basement is all concrete and it was supposedly almost done) It should have been cool and ready to unload when I got home. instead, at the top of the stairs, I heard it. "cu-lick" "Rats. I thought to myself, I must have a rat in the basement, I would LOVE to have a rant in my basement because if that's not what it was... CU-LICK." Yes, my 10.5 hour firing went 20 hours. It appeared to be stuck at 2112 degrees. All three segment lights were lit. I don't know if a relay went out, if an element broke or what, but it appears to not have reached cone and just held shy of cone 5 for 9+ hours. What's killing me right now is wondering how bad it is inside. Are the pieces ruined, stuck to the shelf or in a gooey puddle at the bottom (that's probably not likely) This was the ONE time I didn't use witness cones because the thing was jammed so full I didn't have the space. The thing is still WAY too hot to consider even taking a quick peek. For the next several hours, I have nothing to do but obsess because this was a VERY important load (yeah, because that's how it happens) If in fact they aren't ruined and I can get them out by 4:00 AM, there is hope. So let's play a game... So Brain Trust. If in fact this was a 9 hour soak below the cone I was firing to, how bad is it likely to be?
  13. synj00

    Clay With Bite!

    Hey guys and gals. I'm working on a white locally produced commercial claybody which is my favorite at the moment. I have 200 lbs of it to work through. It is only very lightly grogged. I am going to be doing some more testing with my own locally sourced lake clay but in the meantime I want to give this clay some more bite to it. Rather than grog, can I use silica sand or regular stream sand or something? I like the Korean's texture of the Maksabal which has just enough texture because they are using indigenous clay which is filled with impurities and is sieved leaving behind some of the bigger textured bits. Oh forgot to add that I am firing to cone 6 in oxidation.
  14. firenflux

    wave plate

    From the album: My nautical stuff

    One of my earlier nautical designs. This one is from 2005 I think.
  15. firenflux

    white engobe wave Cup

    From the album: My nautical stuff

    this one is from 2011 when I got my own kiln.
  16. firenflux

    wave vase

    From the album: My nautical stuff

    an example of an earlier nautical piece like the plate, I made this in 2005.
  17. firenflux

    large wave bowl

    From the album: My nautical stuff

    The waves are more subtle on this piece. I coat the bottom in white engobe then carve the textured lines around the waves.
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