Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'curriculum'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Help Topics
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest

Found 3 results

  1. I just accepted a secondary Ceramics and Sculpture position, and I'm waiting for the school district to install HEPA air cleaners before I can start teaching ceramics. Here's the catch: the district is unable to state when they'll install the new equipment (it could be tomorrow or in 6 months), but I still have to teach a group of 30 9th and 10th graders who are enrolled in a course titled "Ceramics 1". What could I teach my class that will still be relevant to ceramics without the clay (bizarre, I know!)? Right now, I have modeling clay, a project where they draw 50 different 3D forms, and a unit where they divide into groups to research and present the history of ceramics to each other... but I'm stuck beyond that. One last tricky bit: many of my Ceramics 1 students are also in my Sculpture 1 class, so I want to keep standard sculpture projects out of the ceramics class if possible. Thanks in advance for your help!
  2. For anyone who is interested, here is the curriculum plan for a ceramics BFA degree through New Hampshire Institute of Art. http://www.nhia.edu/~/media/files/catalog-info-brochures/nhia_curriculum_bfa-ceramics.pdf?la=en best, ........................john
  3. I need to pick the collective genius of the CAD family on a concept for a Junior Cornerstone course for higher ed students. Briefly, cornerstone courses are team taught, interdisciplinary, and cross-curriculum. The courses are generally a full semester long and intended to challenge students to stretch beyond their particular major/minor area of study. Note: the institution is Belmont University with a strong music, music business, and entrepreneurial business programs. Here is the concept. A class/community of students would do research on the history of ceramic musical instruments, select instruments (i.e. (drum,flute, udu, rattle, water whistle, etc.) to construct, actually build/fire their ceramic instruments, compose a musical work using only their projects, and would either record their work or perform it publicly (or both). The rubric for the course would evaluate the research (writing), technical skill (building the ceramic instrument - recording the work), creativity (the instrument & the musical score), musical composition (the score), and the individual and/or collective recorded music. The likely textbook would be Barry Hall's From Mud to Music. My questions: Does this sound (no pun intended) like a fun/challenging course? What would you add to the course to make it more interesting? What challenges would you anticipate,particularly the ceramics process? Is there already a course syllabus that someone is using at another institution? Thanks all! Paul
×