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Found 64 results

  1. I've been using Elaine's Cone 6 porcelain from Sheffield for a few years now, and I love it. I love the feel of it on my hands, I love the way it takes glazes, and overall I've been really happy with it. But over the past, say, 9 months, I've been having new problems with attachments: handles and other attachments are cracking even when I dry super-slow. Does anyone else have experience with this? Any suggestions? I don't want to switch clays, but I'm getting frustrated. Thanks!
  2. This is a problem I have had intermittently since I started making pottery at home in 2010, and lately it seems to be happening to more pieces each firing. 1. Are these pinholes or blisters? Sometimes they are sharp on the edges. 2. How can I correct this? Helpful (?) details: I am doing a slow bisque firing to cone 04. I hold for 10-15 minutes at peak depending how tight I've loaded the kiln. Bisque firing profile: 80/hr to 250F, 200/hr to 1000F, 100/hr to 1100F, 180/hr to 1676F, 80/hr to 1945. Glaze firing to cone 6. I do a programmed "slow" firing on Bartlett controller to 2167F and hold for 15-20 minutes depending on load. Witness cones show cone 6 achieved. Stoneware clay, made by a local manufacturer (all-purpose Goldart-based body rated cone 6 to 8. Contains 4.5% fine grog). 10 cubic foot kiln, electric Kiln is vented with a Vent-a-Kiln hood that is only 2 months old, replaced broken downdraft vent. Problem occurred with both vents. Trouble occurs sporadically with all my glazes, which I mix. The green glaze recipe in example photos: Rutile green: Talc 5, Custer Feldspar 22 Whiting 4 Silica 26 EPK Kaolin 17 Ferro Frit 3134 26 ADD Rutile (light) 6%, Copper Carb 4% Happens on all types of work: mugs, bowls, etc. I've read on the forum about correcting pinholes with a slower bisque but I feel my firing is pretty slow already. Do I need to slow it more? Why does it only happen to certain pieces? Sometimes two identical pieces glazed and fired at the same time in the same way result in one unblemished piece and one as shown above. Working from home on my own and really feeling out of my depth... and incredibly frustrated.
  3. Hi all! The company we work with that formulates our slip is having difficulties achieving the necessary properties for casting. The issues are due to the fact that they are taking a plastic throwing body, and are trying to convert it into a casting slip. Due to the fact that we have little control of that formulation, I do not know the exact recipe for the slip. We are just curious how difficult it is to create a Mid-Range Red Casting Slip that is properly flocculated, and casts evenly with no issues. After firing, the color we are trying to achieve is a Red-Orange, preferably something that withstands thermal shock since we are creating drinking vessels. Does anyone have any recipes, or reasons why a high-iron casting slip acts weird? Thank you all for your time!
  4. I have a Skutt KM822 I have been firing since I bought it new in March 2013. I fire to cone 6 in it. Lately I have noticed a change in when the relays "click." Let me preface by saying the firing I did last week I got error code 1. Kiln stalled out at 2177. I fire to 2210 with a 10 min hold. It was a very hot day when I did this firing, was mid afternoon when the error code 1 came on. I have multiple fans going to move air around in my kiln shed. I did diagnostic test and for amp, voltage. All OK. I also did a test fire of the kiln to 1100 with a 30 min hold and checked every peephole to see if elements all on. They were and I heard relays clicking the entire firing. OK..here is the issue. I just completed another cone 6 firing. I do ramp/hold program. Modified from one I saw online here in this forum. All are degrees Fahrenheit 150 to 250 degrees no hold 400 to 1900 no hold 130 to 2210 Hold 10-13 min. This firing I heard the relays clicking at the beginning. When I checked at 1700 degress no clicking but the temp rising. Checked again at 1923 and I hear clicking relays. Checked again at 2127 no relays sounds but the temp rising. I didn't hear the relays click again until I was in the hold at the end. The temp during the hold rose to 2217 and then the relays began clicking and the temp dropped to 2210. I have fired a manual Skutt for decades, so digital is foreign to me still. I will probably call Skutt this week, but curious if this sounds normal or not to those of you who have more digital firing experience than I do. Appreciate any insight!
  5. I'm currently developing a white glaze for use at Cone 6, oxidation. (Yes, Pres, I did read your recent post!) I'm using a combination of Zircon and Tin to opacify, which gives an almost imperceptible bluish tinge to the white - something I very much like. In fact, I like Tin glazes altogether - but my wallet protests. I'm sure I've seen somewhere or other the idea of adding a tiny amount of a stain to a Zircon opacified glaze to go some way toward emulating the complexity of a snowy blue Tin glaze (and thus saving considerable expense). Has anyone tried this? If so, what stain did you try, and at what sort of percentage?
  6. I have maybe a half shelf or a half and a bit more of "smalls" in an unglazed cone 10 Troy Woodfire body. If I only fire it to cone 6 (for bisque) and I am not able to get into a woodfire anytime soon, and the peices are not being used for food or anything that would get much handling, will that clay be "fired enough"? Or would I be shortchanging myself re: quality by not just holding on to them until I can do a cone 10 wood fire, or even just wait until I can make enough from a high fire body to fill my my electric kiln? I can afford to wait, but I'm not really all that patient if it doesn't make a major structural or aesthetic difference for the type of ware. So-what should I expect-usable at 6 or not until 10?
  7. Hi Y'all - I'm super stressing cause I don't know if I can reverse my mistake. The studio I work at uses a kiln that can fires to a max of cone 10, but regularly fires at cone 06 and uses EM342 whiteware clay. I somehow totally missed the memo and thought I heard them say we fire at cone 6 (!) so I went ahead and bought some really beautiful cone 5-6 glazes, covered a handful of pieces in them, and, to probably no one on this forum's surprise (but to my total dismay) they came out all kinds of wacky Is there any way I can salvage my pieces? One thought - could I fire the pieces again at cone 6? Would the clay be able to withstand that? Your ideas would be appreciated - thanks!
  8. Green geometric cup

    From the album Favorites

    I love all the varied shapes a good mug comes in. The shape is my current favorite. It works well to separate the textured areas from the geometric sgraffito in the bottom. It has a pulled handle and commercial glazes and was fired to cone 6 electric.
  9. Slip Recipes

    Spring is on the way, and I saw robins in the yard already- a month ahead of schedule. I have finished my porcelain study, almost done with stoneware, and done with crystalline. So this spring and summer, I am going to look more closely at slips and standard cone 6 glazes. I have an interest in slips; to be used in non-traditional applications. Have these thoughts rolling around about using slip as color nodes, or for colorant fields for a runny glaze to leach color from as it runs through it. I am sure there are books out there, but I usually do not read them until after I get done experimenting. Do not learn very much by reading them; they tend to be shy on technical information (chemistry). So if you have some generic slip recipes floating around that I can "rearrange"; please send them along please. Nerd
  10. Hello! This is my first post after reading so much fabulous and useful advice on these forums the last couple of years. I'm still a bit of a newbie potter and I've been selling for just over a year. So far I've been really pleased and no complaints or negative comments (exception: why don't you make in blue?) LOL. So I sent off a pair of mugs (Etsy sale) and the new owner is really happy with them, except that he just tried to microwave one to reheat his beverage, and he heard some "pinging" noises. He was alarmed and took the mug out and didn't try again; he's just wondering if I know what is going on. The details: I use Tuckers Pottery 6-50 cone 6 porcelain clay. I fire to cone 6 based on witness cones. (I use cone 7 in the kiln sitter to get there). Glaze: I am making my own glazes. The liner glaze in these mugs was an Assad Opalescent (basic high percentage frit based glaze with no added oxides). Outside was a floating blue glaze (from John Britt's book of Cone 6 glazes: Floating Blue #2) I've used both of these before and have been very happy, and I've personally have had no problems with anything in my home. Unfortunately, I have sold everything at this moment that has this exact glaze combo. Also not sure if a mug done the same isn't necessarily going to be a perfect "test" as glaze thicknesses, exact kiln position, exact top temp, etc may be slightly different? Any advice would be really appreciated! Mostly I'd like to know if in *your* opinion I should tell this buyer not to try to nuke these mugs? I know I've been a bit "reckless" in claiming my things are microwave safe and I'm sorry now I did without being more sure. I've read the forums about the astm standards and I plan to at least test more carefully than just a few things I have at home. Thanks in advance! Cheers, Lorraine.
  11. Sun Valley Glaze

    From the album Glazed Ceramics 2013

    This whole bowl was glazed in sun valley. The outside ran quite a bit onto the foot and cookie it was resting on, but the inside result was very interesting. It breaks in a light blue, and can have a whole range of color changes as it melts. In 2013 this was the largest bowl I had managed to throw, it was made out of 10 pounds of clay. Deciding on if I want to use this glaze again on future works, as it is very unpredictable and runny.
  12. Butterfly mug

    From the album Favorites

    This was a new take on a design I've been doing awhile. It may have spurred a new variation on several of my usual pots. I'm excited to see what comes of it. The pattern at the bottom was created with paper resist and sgraffito. After bisque fired, black underglaze was applied and wiped back, then colorful accents added to the wings. It's finished with commercial ial glazes and fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  13. 24 oz green leaf mug

    From the album Favorites

    Wheel thrown and hand carved. The bottom features a leaf design created by using paper leaves as a resist to the underglaze. Sgraffito designs were added along with a pulled handle and spiral embellishments. Fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  14. Rainbow vase

    From the album Favorites

    Wheel thrown vase with geometric carved design and rainbow pattern in underglaze. Commercial glazes, fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  15. creamsicle butterfly bowl

    From the album Favorites

    wheel thrown bowl covered in underglaze. I used paper butterfly's to resist the white underglaze and create the butterfly design. I then carved a geometric pattern on the inside and outside of the bowl. It's finished in a commercial clear glaze and fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  16. green diamond vase

    From the album Favorites

    Wheel thrown vase with underglaze and sgraffito geometric design. Hand textured and fired in an electric kiln to cone 6.
  17. purple butterfly bowl

    From the album Favorites

    Small wheel thrown bowl with underglaze, geometric sgraffito carving, fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  18. I've been reading Clay and Glazes for the Potter by Daniel Rhodes as well as Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by Hesselberth. Reading these and watching my own firings got me to thinking... How long do thermocouples last? Mine has been fired 125 times. I think it's (I don't have my kiln log in front of me for exact numbers) 55 cone 04 slow bisque, 55 cone 6 slow glaze, 15 cone 05 fast glaze (transfers). And How do you know when your thermocouple is starting to have issues? In my last couple of firings I have had a couple of pieces develop pinholes. I'm trying to remedy this issue since I have never had it before these 2 firings. I am using the same glazes as I have been. I know it might be my bisque firing as well. To fix pinholes at what temperature should I add a hold to burn out the issue? Just a hold at the end temperature? It could also be that my thermocouple is drifting because it needs to be replaced. The cone 6 before this load did not look over fired but this cone looks a little towards the over fired range. It could just be where it was placed or something. If I run a test load through at cone 5 should I add a hold at the end temp? If so for how long? In this last load I also had a couple Amaco Blue Rutile pieces in there and they seem more brown than blue than they usually are. This can also happen if I have the glaze too thin so am not sure if Blue rutile runs brown if over fired. Thank you for helping me answer these questions.
  19. Slate Blue Rustic Mountain Mugs

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in rough speckled stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. One coat Mayco's Stoned Denim on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6 in an electric kiln.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  20. Slate Blue Carved Mountain Tumbler

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Mayco's Stoned Denim on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6 in an electric kiln.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  21. Slate Blue Carved Mountain Tumbler

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Mayco's Stoned Denim on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  22. Hi, I'm new. Newly set up studio in garage...connected the kiln, focusing on tiles, still learning. I work with Standard 420 and 547 clay with lots of grog, and will fire to cone 6. I want to make some really earthy matte floor tiles, and am having a hard time finding matte glazes. The color range I am interested in is cream, burnt sienna , terra cotta (slightly pink?), earthy orange, mossy green, straw?. Attached is a pic.with colors that I love, but it is on a cement tile. Any suggestions on how to get this look- rustic texture and lovely variation on field tiles? It would be cool if these glazes blended/layered nicely with each other. Would they be sprayed on (I've never done that)? What about colorants to the clay and a clear matte glaze on top. I have little experience with colorants. I have never mixed my own glazes, but may be willing to learn (or have my local ceramic supplier mix them for me). Thanks very much. Happy to have this forum! Steph
  23. Hi all, I have been able to consistently mix and use several glazes that I'm very happy with. Now I am trying to find a group of glazes that can be used with each other. Even if it is only two colors on an item. All my work is functional. I feel overwhelmed by the number of choices and am looking for a method to narrow down my search. My glaze chemistry knowledge is limited as I am mostly self taught. I like glazes that run and can be over lapped. I fire cone 6 electric on white stone ware. Thanks for any help offered.
  24. Success

    It only took 18 months (part-time) for me to learn about glazes and how to manipulate them to get results I want. I have read so much about glaze chemistry I feel like my head is going to exploded. For beginners I can't say enough about how helpful John Britts book, The Complete Guide to Mid-Range Glazes was. I want to thank everyone here at CAD for all your help also. So many great things have come out of this last firing even having over fired. I am posting just one of the glazes I have come up with. I replaced pic with a smaller one.
  25. Hello everyone my name is Evan I'm new here and was hoping I could get some help. I am in the process of starting up a studio. I have a bit of experience in ceramics as I have worked at a pottery studio and taken some classes through uni while I work on my industrial design degree. I have purchased several kilns and wheels. 2 small cone setter kilns and 1 large digital ramp master controlled kiln. I plan to set the studio up to be primarily for cone 6 firings. Eventually I want to get a solid product line specializing in porcelain light fixtures that would be made by casting into molds, and also offer open studio times for others needing a studio. I have put together a raw material shopping list to get me started in making my own glazes and experiment with different things and coming up with a high translucent porcelain slip recipe. I could really use everyones opinion on my list, what I should buy more of, what I have to much of, what I don't need and have listed, and what ill need that I haven't listed. I want a bit of everything so I can experiment but I don't want to waste money on things ill never use or buy too much of something I will end up hardly using. Any modification to my shopping list and advise would be greatly appreciated. Cheers- Evan ..... my list ... in pounds 10 x FRIT 3110 100 x Feldspar Custer (Potash) 100 x Feldspar, Minspar 200 (F4) 100 x Nepheline Syenite, 270 mesh 10 x FRIT 3124 50 x Whiting, 325 Calcium Carbonate 50 x Gerstley Borate 100 x EPK (Kaolin) 100 x Ball Clay, OM4 100 x Silica, 200 Mesh 10 x Talc, Pioneer 10 x Dolomite, Dolowhite 10 x Bone Ash 5 x Lithium Carbonate, Fine 5 x Strontium Carbonate 1 x Zircopax Plus/Superpax 1 x Iron Oxide, Spanish Red 1 x Silicon Carbide 400 Grit 1 x Iron Oxide, Yellow-Clean Creek 1 x Titanium Dioxide 1 x Tin Oxide (White) 1 x Zinc Oxide 1 x Copper Oxide, Black 5 x Bentonite, 325 Mesh 1 x Copper Carbonate 1 x Cobalt Carbonate 5 x Manganese Dioxide 20x40 1 x Spodumene, Australian 5 x Barium Carbonate, German 10 x FRIT 3134 10 x Wollastonite, Vanisil W-20 5 x Red Art Clay, Ceder Heights 5 x Tile 6 Georgia Kaolin 1 x Chromium Oxide by the lb. 1 x Cobalt Oxide 5 x Rutile Light Powdered 1 x Darvan 7 Pint
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