Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cone 10'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Help Topics
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest

Found 40 results

  1. I have maybe a half shelf or a half and a bit more of "smalls" in an unglazed cone 10 Troy Woodfire body. If I only fire it to cone 6 (for bisque) and I am not able to get into a woodfire anytime soon, and the peices are not being used for food or anything that would get much handling, will that clay be "fired enough"? Or would I be shortchanging myself re: quality by not just holding on to them until I can do a cone 10 wood fire, or even just wait until I can make enough from a high fire body to fill my my electric kiln? I can afford to wait, but I'm not really all that patient if it doesn't make a major structural or aesthetic difference for the type of ware. So-what should I expect-usable at 6 or not until 10?
  2. I have a new-ish L&L E23T kiln with 3" brick; one of the reasons I chose it was its ability to fire to cone 10. Now it seems that I might want to actually start to do that once in a while—I will mostly use it for bisque and cone 5/6. The motivation to do this is that since I left my last membership studio, I had a small load of cone 10 work gas fired at a friends studio, where I can also use her glazes. Despite the very reasonable $.05 per cu. inch cost, this load cost me $72—more than what two full kiln loads would cost in my electric kiln, and almost double what the friend said it cost in gas for one firing in her kiln! Obviously, that is not sustainable. I know I can't achieve the things I could with cone 10 reduction, but I will limit the firings to what will be happy in oxidation—matte and gloss white, matte black, crawl glaze, and Heino and/or Laguna turquoise. Any advice or words of wisdom about cone 10 electric firing? I'm very new to doing my own firing. I've included a pic of the spectacular Heino glaze from that last gas firing mentioned above; if I could anything close to this in electric oxidation I'd be a very happy potter!
  3. House Wine 2 - Lid Close-up

    From the album Forum Discussion Images

    This is a close-up of the lid/stopper for the "House Wine" vessel. I like sneaking in some detail work on areas that don't show when the top is in place.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  4. House Wine 2

    From the album Forum Discussion Images

    This is the second "House Wine" vessel that I made. This time, underglaze transfers were added in an effort to build more depth to the surface. These are fun to make but seem to require a good bit of time on the workbench. This one is headed for a November show.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  5. House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  6. House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mug, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  7. House on the House on the... Image Transfers

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  8. It just occurred to me that we did an experiment with raku a year or so ago with some soft brick that I have since gotten rid of. I didnt have a temperature gauge or anything but do you think that with a big enough tank and enough soft brick to build something conducive for airflow would it reach cone 10 in a few hours? This would allow me to experiment with glazes, build different configurations, reduction and all that kick@%% stuff :-) Tell me good news! Thanks All!! Sebastian
  9. Commissioned Piano Mugs

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    A small set of hand-built mugs (slab construction) with wheel-thrown rims for family friends...both of whom are musically gifted. The orange has a look of atmospheric firing, but it is actually Amaco Velvet orange underglaze. The sheen over the underglaze is from a light coating of clear. The interior and rim were dipped in Woo's Blue. The details on the piano keys are brushed on. All of the rest of the glazing was sprayed. These are 12oz (.35ml) and stand approximately 5in. (12.7cm) tall. These were fired to Cone 10 in reduction.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA All rights reserved.

  10. Handbuilt (Mostly) Mugs

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are my prototypes for a new direction in hand-building...at least mostly hand-building. I have never been completely satisfied with the resulting rims on hand-built mugs, so I have incorporated wheel-thrown rims that feel so much better on the lips. The k-cup in the image is simply to add something appropriate for scale...and wouldn't be part of a sale *grin*. All of these are 12-14 oz. mugs and the style and production technique are very similar to the work of Sandra Blain (Thanks, Sandy!).

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All rights reserved.

  11. Commissioned 'Piano' Bowl

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a large, 3.5+ quart, mixing bowl that is part of a commission project for a retiring university dean. You might guess that the dean had something to do with the music program...and that would be correct. The bowl stands 7" tall and is a full 12" wide at the rim. The black keys were added individually to the wheel thrown piece and later brushed with Amaco Velvet underglaze. The exterior is glazed with Woo's Blue. The interior is Pete's Cranberry. A final light coat of clear was sprayed over the underglazes section for additional sheen. This is a Cone 10 reduction piece.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  12. New Hampshire, Deerfield--Early May 2016--wood-fired kiln opportunity. Active membership in the NH Potters Guild required--dues are still only $20!! The kiln is fired 4X April through October. Work must be bisqued first. There is a cost for every firing, about $5-$50 based on the volume of work fired. The fee is used to replace cordwood, kiln furniture, repairs etc. Contact: Wendy Jackson wendyjacksonpottery@yahoo.com or Lydia Gray lydiagray@verizon.net -- feel free to mention that you saw the notice on the Ceramics Arts Daily Community Forums. Kiln will be loaded on May 5th.
  13. I am new to using my own kiln, I have an electric one. I use cone 10 porcelain but I don't glaze, I just underglaze. The porcelain after being fired to cone 10 does not come out very white and this is southern ice so it should. The only thing i can think of is that I am putting on a bisque setting till cone 10 (which was recommended by the company L&L Kilns) since I don't do any glazing. Can someone help me out here? Please? Thanks in advance!
  14. Keyboard Mug - Note Handle

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 14oz-16oz wheel-thrown, stoneware mug with slab-built (black only) keys attached to a carved/altered keyboard design. The handle idea is NOT original but borrowed/copied/altered from another artist's project. When I find the name, I will certainly give proper attribution. Interior is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior details are black and white, brushed-on, Amaco Velvet underglazes with a top coating of clear. This is a concept mug for a commissioned gift project that is currently underway. The basic form and structure may remain the same but the color scheme for the actual project will be altered considerably.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  15. Tennis Net Mugs

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  16. Tennis Net Mugs - Handle Finial Detail

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  17. Piano Mug - Hand-built with Thrown Rim

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 12oz-14oz. stoneware mug with a piano/keyboard theme. The rim is wheel thrown and re-assembled into a hand-built, slab-constructed base that has been stamped and stretched/altered. Handle is pulled and attached after the rim is in-place and black keys have been cut from a slab and attached/scored & slipped. Interior and rim is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior parts are brushed-on Amaco Velvet underglaze sprayed with a couple of light coats of clear. Mug is fired to Cone 10 reduction. This is a concept mug, developed for Nashville's music scene and various associated festivals. The design includes the possibility of a custom name imprint along the top edge of the slab construction. Estimated retail would be around $60.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  18. Hi Folks, I have started to use cone 10 porcelain from sheffield pottery. Since it is full of impurities, I decided to fire my porcelain pots in oxidation. My pieces are pretty thin and I get crawling just along the rim of each piece....like clockwork. Crawling is also a problem along sharp ridges where curves of the form jut out and then recede. Does anyone use Sheffield's porcelain cone 10? If so, would you be kind enough to share a clear porcelain glaze recipe that does not crawl, with me? FYI, I wear gloves to handle the ware, glaze immediately after bisque so dust and grease are not a problem. I have added 1.5% bentonite to my glaze to add some small platelets to my glaze mix which has made little to no difference. The recipe which I use (from Mary Risley (RIP) at Wesleyan University 40 years ago....): Custer spar 33 Flint (silcosil) 32 Whiting (snocal 40) 20 Grolleg Kaolin 15 Help?!!! Does anyone have any recommendations (bedsides switching to EPK in the glaze. I am in the process of testing it)? Sharon Nahill Oak Hill Pottery Meredith, NH
  19. Hi y'all! I'm about to order a couple pounds of Laguna Crystalline Glaze (Crystal Palace) and try it out. http://www.axner.com/lagunawc-561crystalpalace10glazedrysoldperlb.aspx Laguna's website says it fires from cone 5 to cone 10, but I'll be doing the first firing at cone 10 in a gas kiln. Has anyone here had prior experience with this glaze? I haven't been able to find much information other than that it is a good base for other crystalline glaze recipes (no info on what those recipes end up looking like though). I'm trying to figure out if it plays well with other glazes and what kinds, as well as different ways to tweak the recipe. Any tips would be much appreciated so I can make the most out of the once-a-month firings! Chloe
  20. Hi I'm wondering if anybody has a recipe for a cone 10 reduction copper red glaze (I'm talking oxblood or peach bloom, NOT flambé) that flashes electric blue? I hear that if you use a feldspar based glaze and use a feldspar that is high in potassium and low in sodium (usually its the other way around) that the glaze will tend to have these blue flashes more. If you know a good recipe and have tried it yourself what cone does it work best around? I know that these glazes don't do best at cone 10 but rather around 8-9, but I still wanna hear your experience. Also, I like to do a quick oxidation at the end of my firing in order to make the copper reds less muddy and dark. If you've had good results, how long do you do this oxidation for? Thanks, Hunter
  21. Note: This post discusses an Australian cone 10 body few will know anything about - I hope it will still be possible to discuss generalisations and brainstorm causes! Ok, my local pottery use a fine, white, 120mesh, high-fire cone 10 porcelaneous stoneware clay (Walker Ceramics PB103), this has been the primary throwing clay for at least the last decade. This year, almost every glaze firing has produced ware with some kind of surface debris of a tiny (1mm) to small (8mm) size. The debris appears on the unglazed pots, as well as scattered below every glaze, but it doesn't break the glaze surface. When you see the debris on the unglazed part of the pot, amidst the off-white clay body, the debris is bright white in colour, and looks for all the world as if you could flick it off with your nail. Sometimes the problem looks like a round pimple, other times it is completely irregular in shape. The pieces are mostly utilitarian ware, bowls, cups, plates, some decorative and sculptural. Regardless of whether the surface has been untouched from wet/trimmed at leather hard/or sanded/sponged from bone dry, the debris appears. The biscuit firing shows no issues, but almost every glaze fired piece shows symptoms (but not *always*!) After the first instance of this problem, the recycled clay anyone was using was dumped. Yet firings from the new bagged clay showed the same issue. (We were monitoring the clay being used carefully, as we were all working toward producing ware for a fundraiser.) We are quite perplexed. The group are mostly old school potters, I mention this because the internal discussion about our problem has no consensus. While there are a lot of folk with knowledge of the body, the kilns, and the process, no can agree whether the body is at fault, or something else. I am young, technically-minded, and have OCD - I want to understand and know why! While I know my clays, I know less about their kilns and firing. Is is the body? Is it dirty shelves? Is something inside the kiln deteriorating? Is it organics not burning out? We wondered about over-firing, but we did a few firings where the cone 9 did not go flat, so over-firing seems unlikely. The pottery is communal, different glazes are used, sometimes no glaze, and still the debris. We work exclusively with high-fire stoneware or porcelain. No low or mid-fire bodies are allowed inside the studio, or their electric kilns. No personal glazes, no experimentation, they risk nothing. I know little about the firing specifics, but apparently no firing programme changes have been made. I know they fire at a rise of 150°C per hour, top fire to 1280°C. I know this post is all over the place and a bit rambling, and I apologise. I just want to know if anyone has seen or heard of anything like this before? (I have enquired with the manufacturer, and am taking my dSLR to get detailed shots of the problem to send to them, when I have them I will post the images here.) Many thanks.
  22. Since day 1 I wanted to do wood firing. I started with an electric kiln and although it is possible to do interesting things I'm still focused on ultimately doing Anagama. I cant truly test Cone 10 glazes in my electric and want to get as close to possible to that environment, which means a way to do reduction, neutral and oxidation. So I got a broke down Duncan kiln donated to me and the burner came in today so I'm super excited!!! Stripping it down tonight and getting the elements out then will figure out how to cut the burner port and the top opening. Then I have to find a 40 - 50 gallon tank. Gaaaaaaah excited! df
  23. F2 "The Eater" Tornado Planter

    From the album Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Fujita scale is a measure of a tornado's intensity based upon the amount of destruction it causes...or how much it eats. Having experienced the destruction, first hand, of an F2 glancing off my home, it wasn't difficult to put a face on the monster that caused destruction in my neighborhood. Only now, new things grow from where the damage occured...thus a container for a plant with the form of the dark cloud of demolition impressed into the side.

    © Copyright 2015 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All Rights Reserved.

  24. test clay

    From the album Tobys Pottery

    3/4 lb test clay . translucent porcelain

    © dont copy

  25. test clay

    From the album Tobys Pottery

    3/4 lb test clay . translucent porcelain

    © dont copy

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.