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Found 7 results

  1. I am having a friend save me some guitar strings to experiment with firing a piece that is wrapped with them to see what kind of effect the melting/burning of the strings has on the clay and glaze. I swear I have heard of this being done before, but I am struggling to find anything on it via Google. Has anyone experimented with guitar strings in their firings before? I'm wondering if I'm wasting my time or if it could have some cool results. Thanks in advance!
  2. Help Replicating Glaze

    I'm hoping someone can tell me how this kind of glaze effect is accomplished or if this is glaze , these were advertised as ceramic plugs so i assumed the color on top is glaze and the sides look like bisque, please help, id love to replicate these colors on my pottery, it looks more like glass then glaze. thanks
  3. Deborah Bedwell Workshop Surface Academy: Velvet Underglazes, Classroom Engobes and More! WS04 – Saturday, 10-4pm, May 21, 2016 Fee: $100 member/$115 non-member Scribble, doodle and dot! This 1-day workshop will introduce students to the colorful world of velvet underglazes, engobe slips and more. Participants will explore application techniques underneath glaze and on top of the glaze surface in this class. This class will encourage you to utilize line and color on your ceramic pieces while you learn how to bring a casual, playful, graphic sensibility to pottery making. Participants are encouraged to bring both leatherhard and bisque, either porcelain or stoneware, and experiment with the classroom materials. Open to all levels of artists with curious minds, previous clay experience is recommended, potters or hand-builders welcome. DEBORAH BEDWELL is one of the founding artists of Baltimore Clayworks and led the organization as the founding Executive Director from 1980-2011. Beginning in 2012 Deborah was elected NCECA President Elect. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Berea College (KY), a master’s degree from Towson State University (MD), and studied arts management at U. Mass. Amherst. She has received much acclaim for her success in creating Clayworks’ community arts programs, which has made the arts accessible to underserved individuals throughout Baltimore and the region. Her extensive knowledge of contemporary ceramics has taken her throughout the US and abroad where she has served as a panelist, curator, lecturer and workshop presenter. In addition she is an accomplished potter who continues to exhibit her clay work both locally and nationally. In the 1st quarter of 2013 she worked as artist-in-residence at Tainan National University for the Arts in Tainan, Taiwan ROC. WS04 – Saturday, 10-4pm, May 21 Fee: $100 Members; $115 Non-members Contact Matt Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org or Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  4. Sue Tirrell Workshop: Folkloric Pottery with a Modern Sensibility WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 7 & 8, 2015 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member In this 2-day hands-on workshop Sue will demonstrate the construction and decoration techniques she employs to create her colorful, animal-centric porcelain pottery. Using both the potter’s wheel and hand-building techniques Sue will demonstrate her unique approach to form and surface, drawing and carving, and the use of color to weave the pottery narrative. Additional discussion topics will cover Idea generation – folklore, allegory, material meaning and personal narrative – as they help to shape and inform the work. Participants will have the opportunity to employ these ideas through their own work during both days. Please bring a sketchbook, personal carving tools and any reference material you would like to incorporate in your work (photos, drawings, etc.) Bio Born and raised in Red Lodge, MT, Sue Tirrell received a BFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 1997. She served as Education Director for the Custer County Art & Heritage Center in Miles City, MT for seven years where she implemented arts education outreach to rural schools and communities. She has been a resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, MT; California State University, Chico; and the Custer County Art & Heritage Center in Miles City (also director of education from 1998 to 2005). Tirrell's work has been included in regional and national juried and invitational exhibitions and museums. Sue's work explores themes of the West and nature. She investigates cultural stereotypes of the west in a witty and whimsical way with her cowgirls and cowboys that have an underlying tongue and cheek humor to them playing with sentiment, nostalgia and kitsch. Her rich glazes have a seductive quality while the work refers to several ceramic traditions from Greek to Chinese to Folk art. Tirrell's work has continued to gain widespread attention and acclaim. In 2006, images of her work were published in the book "500 Animals in Clay" (Lark Books). WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 7 & 8, 2015 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  5. Has anyone tried coloring gray stoneware with mason stains? I've used mason stains in cone 10 porcelain and it's been great, but I'm wondering if cone 10 stoneware is colorable too? I can of course test this out, but if someone else has done it that's of course a lot less time consuming! Of course the coloring won't be as bright as porcelain no matter what, but I'm more worried about the shrinkage rate changing possibly if I decided to use a colored stoneware with my regular stoneware.
  6. Working With Pure Pigments

    I have a considerable collection of pure earth, ochre and oxide pigments and oxides which I purchased for my encaustic medium via http://www.earthpigments.com. I would like to better understand how I can use these in the creation of stains and engobes. Do any of you do this? Might you have recipes or general rules of thumb for me? I see a lot online about "ceramic pigments" but I am pretty sure these are formulated, not pure. I'll happily text the options, but would love to hear people's experience first as these pigments are expensive and hard to get from where I now live in central Chile (by way of Boulder, Colorado). My main ceramic medium is porcelain, and I prefer to fire to cone 11/12 for translucency. However, I am concerned about burn out in the colors when using pure pigments and am happy to try cone 6 to maintain color. I will also test on terra cotta and stoneware. I am most interested in painting raw porcelain with the stains and/or engobes and doing a single firing, but I'm wide open. I am a beginner, really, with lofty aspirations. I love the work of Michelle Summer and am looking for a similar effect. I'm I right that the running in the work is only achievable with the clear glaze on top? Is she using underglaze, do you think? http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mTkhN5hewWU/T4m5nVRXpWI/AAAAAAAAAbQ/jNHD6-jMdjw/s1600/DSCN2916.JPG I have seen this "bleeding" color under clear glaze in a lot of Japanese work lately. Am I correct that this is engobe + clear glaze? So, a couple of questions in this one. I appreciate any info you can share! Direct experience, links, anything. Warmly, Heather
  7. Wondering if there is a clever way to do gradient slip decoration where one color fades into another. My idea so far has been to water down the slip and get progressively thicker as I want the darker color. But I think that it would end up being a gradation of stripes. I may be able to brush from each application downward into the thinner applications to mask the lines though. Anyone tackle this before?
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