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  1. Good Afternoon, I'm using a Paragon HT22 kiln with the Dwyer gas inlet flow meter. I'm producing small wire springs (stainless steel) that need to be heat treated in order to secure their final form. In my regular smaller kiln, the oxygen in the atmosphere is reacting with the heated stainless steel and results in pretty intense discoloration (brown/dark purple/etc). Using my new kiln with a tank of Nitrogen gas hooked up, I am able to produce springs that have only a slight blue discoloration. This drastic reduction in discoloration/oxidation means that the nitrogen gas is working it's magic, and pushing the vast majority of oxygen out of the kiln, creating an ALMOST perfect inert atmosphere. The question is: IS IT PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE to create a perfectly inert atmosphere in the kiln? Is there something I'm not seeing here? I'm investigating trying to get a higher flow dwyer meter to allow me to pump nitrogen in at a higher rate, but in my gut, I feel like it's not possible. The removal of this blue oxidation requires a chemical bath, which is certainly within my ability to perform, but I'd really rather not. Does anyone have any experience with these gas injected paragon kilns? Any words of wisdom/tips/tricks? Appreciate the help. Kiln on.
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