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Found 6 results

  1. Hi. I am new to the community. I am looking to acquire a potters wheel. Kick wheel or motorized. I live in Olympia, Washington. I will pay what is reasonable, but ideally i hope to acquire one that is no longer used, for free. Hope you all had a great new years eve! I look forward to hearing from you
  2. I have to admit that I have a lot of curiosity about my fellow forum members and the sort of work they're doing. That being the case, I thought I'd post a few pictures of a teapot that came out of the kiln a couple days ago, and ask if others here would be willing to post pictures of their teapots as well. I especially like to see the teapots other potters make because I think it's one of those forms that require a certain level of skill to carry off. It's a commonly-held point of view that if you can make a teapot, you can probably make whatever else you want to make. Teapots are complicated structures, function-wise, and require a fair amount of thought and/or experience to make well. On the other hand, there are very accomplished potters who don't choose to make any teapots at all, because they require a lot of time to put together, compared to other pots. It's hard to find a decent handmade teapot for under a hundred bucks, and that probably doesn't fairly represent the amount of labor it takes to make a teapot. But for journeyman potters like me, I think making teapots is a good exercise for building skills and insight into the form. Anyway, here's my teapot. I like this one because it developed a lot more crystallization on one side than the other, so it's like having two teapots in one.
  3. I had a teapot in which the glaze filled in the small holes opening into the spout. I drilled out the glaze. My nonfunctional teapot now pours nicely but.... there are unglazed areas where I used the drill. If I put more glaze on those spots and refire (cone 5), i am afraid of ruining the original glaze. If I put a low fire glaze o those small spots and refire at cone 06 will it affect the original glaze. or... is there any type of sealant I could just brush on the small spots that would be food safe???
  4. i am looking for a resource with info to help make my teapots more functional. Aesthetically I am happy with the way they look but do not like the way they pour. I am sure there are some guidelines about a good spout that I am missing.
  5. July 20–26 at Touchstone Center for Crafts Teapots: Atmospheric Effects for Electric Firing Steven Hill Intermediate–Advanced | $800 Weeklong Workshop In this workshop, we will throw and assemble teapots and cups and work with decorative slip. Steven will discuss his philosophy of making pottery, while throwing, assembling and decorating the forms and techniques for which he is well known. The focus will be on spouts, handles, form, surface, and the relationship between these elements. When glazing, we will address ways to achieve the kind of richness and surface variation in electric kilns that potters have come to associate with fuel-burning kilns and reduction firing. The goal is not to imitate reduction, but to set the stage so that multiple layered glazes can interact with each other in the firing. The basic techniques of spraying and the more advanced theories of layering and blending glazes will be addressed. We will fire at cone 6 oxidation. Demonstrations will be on throwing and assembly, but hand-builders are welcome as well. Steven Hill earned his BFA from Kansas State University in 1973 and has been a studio potter since 1975. His work is exhibited and sold in nationally juried shows, and featured in many ceramics books. He has conducted nearly 200 workshops throughout the United States and Canada, and has written many ceramics articles. In 1998, Steven co-founded Red Star Studios Ceramic Center in Kansas City, Missouri, and he co-founded Center Street Clay in Sandwich, Illinois, in 2006. He is currently doing what he does best: making pots, writing about ceramics, teaching workshops, and letting someone else take care of business! Learn more about his work at stevenhillpottery.com
  6. Unique pieces for the unique individuals. Enjoy a piece of art in your everyday life, something you can touch and use, that expresses yourself. That is not mass manufactured, provides ergonomic hold with different texture, satisfy your sensation in visual, touch and taste. Enhance the experience of drinking tea, like the Japanese tea ceremony. The purpose of my collections are to bring joy to people through the appreciation of the beauty in ceramic, and carry the passion from one to another in our daily life. The stamp you see on the pieces is the last word of my Mandarin name, pronounced “showâ€, meaning Jade like stone. I stamp this on my pieces in hope that it will be as what the word represents. Please come and have a look during Oct. If you would like to have a chat, I will be there on the 5th of Oct fro 1-3pm. If you would like to see more, please visit http://imisabellawang.blogspot.com.au/ I am also on intragram - username: imisabellawang Have a look, let me know what you think.
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