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Found 12 results

  1. How do I get the appearance of cork on the surface of slabs? I've seen it done, tried a number of things, and nothing seems to work. Would appreciate any instructions, or links to articles, etc. (I've searched extensively for this, but just get information back on either pottery in Cork County, or using cork stoppers, etc.) Thanks!
  2. Jenny Mendes Workshop Awakening the Possibilities: Terra Cotta Jungle WS05 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, June 11 & 12 2016 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member This hands-on, two day workshop is for anyone who wants to awaken the possibilities in their ceramic work through the imaginative use of color decoration. Jenny will demonstrate various vibrant ways to approach the surface as a painter, by means of a palette of terra sigillatas, underglaze, washes and oxides. Simple hand-built forms and tiles will serve as your canvas. She will share her “low tech method†of making terra sigillata. The emphasis will be on helping participants relax so they can play with color, texture and imagery on the surface of their work. A willingness to have fun and embrace the deliberate awkwardness of finding oneself in unknown territory is the only prerequisite! All levels welcome. Jenny Mendes earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1982, and has been a full time studio artist since 1994. Jenny is an internationally recognized ceramic artist working primarily with clay to create hand-built and decorated ceramics. She exhibits her ceramic artwork nationally at galleries and juried shows. Since completing a three-year residency at the Penland School of Crafts in 2007, she has completed additional short-term residencies in France, Slovenia, Macedonia, and the US. She currently resides in Ohio, teaches an occasional workshop, and gardens for pleasure. Artist Statement Using clay as my primary material, I have found an entry way into my subconscious. I work intuitively with a palate comprised of many things. First I create a structure which I overlay with painted patterns of emotional experience, sensory based memories, cellular formations, and other discoveries. Working within a human/animal narrative, I engage in a dialogue that witnesses and reflects an invitation into my world. WS05 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, June 11 & 12, 2016 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member
  3. Deborah Bedwell Workshop Surface Academy: Velvet Underglazes, Classroom Engobes and More! WS04 – Saturday, 10-4pm, May 21, 2016 Fee: $100 member/$115 non-member Scribble, doodle and dot! This 1-day workshop will introduce students to the colorful world of velvet underglazes, engobe slips and more. Participants will explore application techniques underneath glaze and on top of the glaze surface in this class. This class will encourage you to utilize line and color on your ceramic pieces while you learn how to bring a casual, playful, graphic sensibility to pottery making. Participants are encouraged to bring both leatherhard and bisque, either porcelain or stoneware, and experiment with the classroom materials. Open to all levels of artists with curious minds, previous clay experience is recommended, potters or hand-builders welcome. DEBORAH BEDWELL is one of the founding artists of Baltimore Clayworks and led the organization as the founding Executive Director from 1980-2011. Beginning in 2012 Deborah was elected NCECA President Elect. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Berea College (KY), a master’s degree from Towson State University (MD), and studied arts management at U. Mass. Amherst. She has received much acclaim for her success in creating Clayworks’ community arts programs, which has made the arts accessible to underserved individuals throughout Baltimore and the region. Her extensive knowledge of contemporary ceramics has taken her throughout the US and abroad where she has served as a panelist, curator, lecturer and workshop presenter. In addition she is an accomplished potter who continues to exhibit her clay work both locally and nationally. In the 1st quarter of 2013 she worked as artist-in-residence at Tainan National University for the Arts in Tainan, Taiwan ROC. WS04 – Saturday, 10-4pm, May 21 Fee: $100 Members; $115 Non-members Contact Matt Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org or Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  4. Kevin Snipes Workshop Heck Yeah: Creativity and Clay WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, May 14 & 15 2016 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member Artist Talk: Saturday May 14 at 6pm. Free and open to the public. Heck Yeah! - Creativity and Clay. Come explore the right side of your brain with Kevin Snipes and clay. Stretch, poke, prod, shape, squish and draw out those ideas! Working with both 2 and 3-D materials, he will help you unleash the hidden images and talents buried in your psyche. Engage in fun ways to invigorate your imagination with drawing, painting, collage and sculpting. Brainstorming with paper and pencil can lead to unexpected twists and turns that can be transferred to your ceramic art. Ceramic surface techniques and creating forms will be explored. This is open to all skill levels and artists from a variety of media. Kevin Snipes was born in Philadelphia, but grew up mostly in Cleveland, Ohio. He received a B.F.A. in ceramics and drawing from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1994. After leaving grad school at the University of Florida in 2003 Kevin has led a seemingly nomadic artistic life, constantly making making no matter where he is. Kevin has participated in several artist residency programs, including the Clay Studio, in Philadelphia and Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, in New Castle, Maine and received a Taunt Fellowship from the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana 2008. Exhibiting both nationally and internationally, including a recent solo exhibition at the Society of Arts and Craft, Boston; Akar, Iowa City and Duane Reed Gallery in St. Louis. Kevin has exhibited as far away as Jingdezhen, China. Kevin combines his love of constructing unconventional pottery with an obsessive need to draw on everything that he produces, creating a uniquely dynamic body of work. www.Kevinsnipes.com Contact Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  5. Okay, I have a decision to make. I've always felt that bowls for actual use are often best at displaying food if the interior of the bowl is white. On the other hand, decorating the exterior of a shallow soup bowl means that no one will see the decoration without taking the time to pick up the piece. So I've almost always decided in favor of decorated interiors. I still feel that the interiors of large shallow bowls make the best canvas for decorative surface treatments, but now I'm trying to decide if I should change my ways and make my smaller bowls with white interiors and decorated exteriors. I did a batch of these, and I'll include a couple poor photos of one of these smaller bowls, plus a pic of a big bowl decorated on the inside. So how do you feel about this decorative principle? Would you decorate these bowls on the inside, or the outside? Or both?
  6. This 2-day workshop will explore an array of leatherhard and bisqueware decorative options to enhance your pottery surface. Demonstrations are divided into two sections: pre and post firing. Initial explorations will begin in the green-ware stage to include the use of slip, slip trailing, sprigging, as well as trimming. In the bisqueware portion, glaze strategies will be investigated with trailing and waxing techniques demonstrated. Upon the completion of this workshop you will be armed with a variety of skills to apply towards your future pottery practice. Participants will have the opportunity to employ these ideas through their own work during both days. Please bring a sketchbook, personal potting tools, assorted brushes and any reference material you would like to incorporate in your work (photos, drawings, etc.) Bio Ryan J. Greenheck received his Master of Fine Arts degree from SUNY College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2004. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree as well as a Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Wisconsin-Stout in 2002. He has participated in numerous national juried exhibitions and shows since 2000. His work is represented in many galleries throughout the country. Ryan currently is a practicing studio potter and Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. WS01 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, January 16 & 17, 2016 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  7. Hi guys, I'm looking for anything that I can add to my porcelain slip (cone 10) that will result in a fine surface texture. This could be fairly uniform almost sandpaper-y, to just varied and rough. Like below: http://www.walkerceramics.com.au/images/Compressed%20images/BRT%201280%20R%20054.jpg http://claymotion.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/brtsample.jpg Not necessarily the colors I"m after, more just the texture, but open to any suggestions. Any thoughts would be great!
  8. Sue Tirrell Workshop: Folkloric Pottery with a Modern Sensibility WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 7 & 8, 2015 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member In this 2-day hands-on workshop Sue will demonstrate the construction and decoration techniques she employs to create her colorful, animal-centric porcelain pottery. Using both the potter’s wheel and hand-building techniques Sue will demonstrate her unique approach to form and surface, drawing and carving, and the use of color to weave the pottery narrative. Additional discussion topics will cover Idea generation – folklore, allegory, material meaning and personal narrative – as they help to shape and inform the work. Participants will have the opportunity to employ these ideas through their own work during both days. Please bring a sketchbook, personal carving tools and any reference material you would like to incorporate in your work (photos, drawings, etc.) Bio Born and raised in Red Lodge, MT, Sue Tirrell received a BFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 1997. She served as Education Director for the Custer County Art & Heritage Center in Miles City, MT for seven years where she implemented arts education outreach to rural schools and communities. She has been a resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, MT; California State University, Chico; and the Custer County Art & Heritage Center in Miles City (also director of education from 1998 to 2005). Tirrell's work has been included in regional and national juried and invitational exhibitions and museums. Sue's work explores themes of the West and nature. She investigates cultural stereotypes of the west in a witty and whimsical way with her cowgirls and cowboys that have an underlying tongue and cheek humor to them playing with sentiment, nostalgia and kitsch. Her rich glazes have a seductive quality while the work refers to several ceramic traditions from Greek to Chinese to Folk art. Tirrell's work has continued to gain widespread attention and acclaim. In 2006, images of her work were published in the book "500 Animals in Clay" (Lark Books). WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, November 7 & 8, 2015 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  9. Joe Campbell – The Potter’s Brush Workshop WS02 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, April 25 & 26, 2015 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member The tools we use in our studio can and should be an integral part of what we say with our work, and their voice should be heard. Good brushes, chosen for their particular ability, and used with skill, are critical to the success of our pieces. In this 2-day, hands on workshop, we will visit the history of the potter’s brush, explore techniques for the application of ceramic materials, and learn to build good ceramic brushes. Slides, videos, handouts, and instructor demonstrations will weave together the process for making brushes, and their skillful use with slips, engobes, underglazes, glazes, and wax resist. During the class students will make 3 brushes of their choosing, and have the time and opportunity to enhance their decorating skills using these new tools and new knowledge. All necessary materials for brush construction will be provided. Joe Campbell has been making pots for over 45 years, and making his own fine brushes for over 25. He is Professor Emeritus from Frederick Community College, having retired after 33 years of college level instruction in Ceramics and Art. Joe received his MFA in Ceramics from Ohio University in 1976, and his BS in Ceramics from Frostburg State College in 1973. His ceramic work has always been involved with the making of vessels, with a particular focus on the surface. “Yes from a functional standpoint, I want my pieces to work well, but shame on me if that is all they do. Great pots should strive to be every bit as engaging as a good painting or sculpture, and have as an added bonus, their physical function in our kitchens and our homes. This has always been my challenge in the studio. †His brushes are a natural outgrowth of this same challenge, seeking to be great decorating tools, and beautiful, intimate little pieces of sculpture in their own right. Joe has conducted numerous workshops in brush making and decorating throughout the nation, and done artist in residence stays from Watershed in Maine, to Tierra Hermosa Studios in New Mexico. WS02 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, April 25 & 26, 2015 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  10. Yoshi Fujii Seductive Elegance – Carving on Clay SF04 –Sunday, 10-4pm, July 20, 2014 Fee: $60 member/$85 non-member This 1-day workshop will introduce students to surface embellishment through carving the leather-hard surface. Yoshi will demonstrate using the potter’s wheel to create functional objects (simple cup & bowl forms) to serve as a collection point for visual inspiration. Students will explore the elegant quality of porcelain and seductive beauty possible through hand-carved pattern. Previous clay experience is required, open to hand-builders or potters. Students may choose to bring leather-hard pots or tiles with them, grog-free clay recommended. Course fee includes bisque firing. Yoshi Fujii is currently a resident artist and was the recipient of the 2008–09 Lormina Salter Fellowship and the newest addition to the Clayworks as well as the city of Baltimore. Yoshi received his B.F.A from University of Southern Mississippi in 2002 and his M.F.A. from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 2008. His interest is in wheel-thrown porcelain utilitarian and sculptural work. His current work and additional information are available at: www.yoshifujii.com SF04 –Sunday, 10-4pm, July 20, 2014 Fee: $60 member/$85 non-member Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  11. Hi guys, Quick questions about porcelain- I'm making some small vessels from slip cast porcelain, and really loving the soft matte look they get after being fired to bisque (1000celsius). Unfortunately when I fire to 1200celsius to finish them they get a rough sandy feel to them (feels like nails on a chalkboard) and lose the subtlely of colors/shrink etc. My main issue is the sandy surface and I'm wondering if there are any issues with selling little planters as bisque? Is this generally frowned upon? The bisque doesnt leak water as such but it kind of bleeds through a little in spots but i could make it thicker. OR- would it be better using another sort of clay that doesnt warp/shrink/and doesnt have that same rough texture? If so can someone recommend any? Plain earthenware? I would ideally like to make foodsafe versions eventually too which requires glaze obviously. Any help would be greatly appreciated, Jack
  12. Bryan Hopkins: Porcelain Vessels from Function to Dysfunction WS03 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, August 16 & 17, 2014 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member In this hands-on workshop participants will push their creative limits, as well as the physical limits of porcelain. Porcelain will be used and exploited for its unique and amazing plastic and fired qualities. Bryan will demonstrate his methods for combining wheel-thrown elements to create unique utilitarian forms and vessels. Participants will investigate a range of surface textures and construction methods through the use of bisque molds, x-Acto knives, wood carving tools and water etching. These surface enhancements will be employed to create new dimensions on the forms while emphasizing the translucent beauty of porcelain. The workshop will offer a balance of instructor demonstration, image presentation, one-on-one attention and student work time to explore avenues. This course is open to both wheel-workers and hand-builders and requires a basic working knowledge of clay coupled with a willingness to explore new ideas before enrolling. Bryan Hopkins was born in Philadelphia, PA. He was a mathematics major at West Chester University when he took his first ceramics class. Bryan went on to earn an MFA in Ceramics from the State University of New York at New Paltz. Bryan has been a studio potter working in porcelain since 1990, and has lived in Buffalo, NY, since 1995. Bryan works as Adjunct Professor of Ceramics and 3-D Design for Niagara County Community College, and has also taught at Medaille College, SUNY at New Paltz, and SUNY at Fredonia. Bryan’s work has been exhibited in group and solo shows nationally, including the NCECA Clay National Biennial (2005 & 2009), the Craft Guild of Dallas, TX, MudFire Clayworks in Decatur, GA and SOFA Chicago and his work has been published in Ceramics Monthly, Ceramics: Art and Perception, Studio Potter, 500 Vases, and Best of 500 Ceramics. Bryan is a founding participant in Objective Clay, a diverse on-line craft forum sharing ideas and new work from 14 utilitarian ceramic artists. Learn more about Bryan’s work and process at www.hopkinspottery.com WS03 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, August 16 & 17, 2014 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
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