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Found 169 results

  1. Hello! I have recently made the transition from earthenware to stoneware to create mugs and dinnerware. I am fairly confident I applied the glaze to thickly to these mugs as I have made three and all three have small thin hairline cracks around the areas of thicker glaze... bummer.. a lesson learnt. I wonder if i can save these mugs though? The cracks are only on the outside surface there are no cracks to the bottom or inside. Shall I write them off (use might be dangerous) consider them seconds or try to repair the cracks? I have seen a few methods of repairing on google, I don't want the repairs to be too obvious, Would be nice if i could repair and re-glaze to blend the appearance of the repair. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, I may be a little sentimental over these as they are my first function stoneware makes.. Emma
  2. Online Workshops

    The next series of online classes are posted on TeachinArt Instructors to look for is Marcia Selsor that is pushing forward with discovery in Alternative Firing. David Voorhees is giving tips about successful throwing of porcelain. Connie Christensen makes a tea set; tray and all and later this year we will add her shino expertise to this school. Nan Rothwell is the latest addition and we are very excited to add her stoneware throwing class. Antoinette Badenhorst added 4 classes in porcelain from Understanding porcelain to making projects in hand building to wheel throwing. Her pinching teapots for the complete beginner is very popular and the pinching porcelain teapots will be available late fall to early winter. An introduction to understanding glazes will also follow later this year. Instructors to look forward to is Paul Lewing, Curtis Benzle and Marie Gibbons. Each one bringing their specialty to TeachinArt.
  3. I have been having a strange issue with my Cone 6 Black Stoneware Clay from Standard (266). It gets these big cracking bubbles upon glaze firing. I bought this clay to marble with Porcelain (Standard 365) because it had a similar shrink rate. The marbled pieces came out SUPER bubbly, really horrible. I thought it was just poor clay preparation on my part because of the mixing of the two. However it has been happening with pots I make solely out of the Black Stoneware. I prepare this clay the same way I do all my other clay bodies and never really have this issue otherwise. Has anyone else had this problem with this clay? Any advice?
  4. IMG 6849

    From the album Curves and Crisp Edges

    Hand built using Clayworks LGH Stoneware clay. Terra Sigillata finish

    © Linda Lees

  5. IMG 6827

    From the album Curves and Crisp Edges

    Hand built using Clayworks LGH Stoneware clay. Terra Sigillata finish

    © Linda Lees

  6. Hi all, I'm hoping someone can give some technical tips on repairing my Cromartie Hobbycraft kiln with controller and which is not hard wired but runs off a 13 amp plug. It is a top loader. Bought as a used kiln, I have been using this quite happily for a number of years until recently where it has stopped reaching a stoneware glaze firing of 1240C. I have replaced the elements and ceramic insulators, checked and cleaned up all the connections and tightened the belts around the body and lid. I have also changed the electrical lead from a short one which fitted into a socket not on the main circuit to a longer lead, about 5-6 meters, to reach a socket on the main circuit as I understand it can cope better with the energy required. I wondered if it makes a difference that the lead is much longer than the original which was no more than 2 meters. Any advice or tips will be very gratefully received. Thanks Kathy
  7. I have been studying plasticity in stoneware bodies, as most know. I am finding some results that are making me question the accepted belief that plasticity equates to ease of throwing. Plasticity in general comes from the electrostatic charges on the clay particles; which changes as the body ages. I am looking for articles that specifically review the relation of sub micron ball clays, to the ease of throwing. I am trying to determine/figure out how mass plays a role in throwing. Ron Roy and I had this discussion at NCECA; what is the cut-off point for large and intermediate mesh sizes, before those additions create a denser mass: which makes the clay harder to push around on a wheel. It is very common for stoneware bodies to have 80% total clay content, there are some even higher than that. So I still find myself questioning if mass is playing the larger role in determining if a clay is easier to push around? Not sure if I am articulating my thoughts correctly, but hopefully I have made the question clear enough. As a comparison: everyone knows how easily porcelain moves around when thrown. The most common analogy is that it throws like cream cheese. That is because porcelain in general has 25% silica, and 25% feldspar; which has much less mass than fire clay. One of the major differences is mass: stoneware has more clay content; and much larger particle sizes. I have tested this theory by adding V-gum and macaloid to high percentage formulas of fire clay/intermediate clay. These additions are not the norm; solely done to test if plasticity is the determining factor in ease of throwing. Nerd
  8. Ceramic In progress works 013

    From the album WIPs

    At least it turned out nearly flawless. Large 12" across, planter from a gritty brown stoneware with off-white slip painting under clear glaze. Formed inside an automotive oil pan with coils.

    © Ann Nielsen

  9. Introduction of SAS Formulation - hypothesis The industry standard has been formulation based on particle size distribution (PSD), which includes density packing. The Zameck article proposed formulation based on the PSD principle; which included emphasis on density packing. However, particle size is a measurement that only determines the plane (face) of a particle, but does not include the depth. A sugar cube represents a perfectly square particle: which has the same plane and depth equal. Clays however can have the same particle size on the face, but vary widely in depth. So a large grain of clay could be represented by a sugar cube shape: but in reality the depth can be anywhere from a thickness of hair up to a normal sugar cube shape. So using PSD as a determining factor for packing density is inaccurate; because it does not include the measurement of depth (platelet.) Specific Area Surface (SAS) is:Specific surface area (SAS) is a property of solids defined as the total surface area of a material per unit of mass. The SSA can be simply calculated from a particle size distribution, making some assumption about the particle shape. The SAS is far more accurate, in that it takes into account both the width (particle size) and the depth (platelet size) of clay. In common calculations: a potter will factor in a 200 mesh clay: but has no idea if that platelet size is 20-50-100-1200 mesh thick. So determining packing density solely on the basis of particle size is inaccurate, because platelet size is not factored. A 200 mesh clay could have a SAS as low as 18, and as high as 28: which this variance alone confirms the inaccuracy of using particle size alone. In addition to using the SAS in determining accurate grain size; the SAS will also give the potter insight into the plasticity of the clay of choice. The higher the SAS goes, the more plastic the clay will be. (Applicable to ball clays and bentones primarily). More importantly, the SAS becomes the basis of formulation because it factors total grain size. So from here, the SAS formulation needs to be applied.. Nerd
  10. Hi guys. Im about to lose my mind. I started pottery about 6 months ago and have been progressing really well. I started with buff stoneware and went on to white stoneware with no problems. I was throwing upto 800 gms till now. Recently I tried throwing a 1500 and then 2000 gms and was so pleased that I was successful. And then one day I couldn't center anymore. And the worst part is I cant figure out why. Not even 600 gms. Not even less. Nothing. I always get a twist right at the bottom on the clay where it touches the wheel and lumps/knots throughout my clay ! I just dont know what it is. After failing on my wheel at home, I tried it in my pottery class in front of my tutor as well. As soon as I touch the clay it gets this nasty twist at the bottom that I cant get out. My pottery teacher and two other students tried to center it as well with no luck. I just dont understand why this is happening. Ive tried different clays, different wheels - nothing. Im getting so frustrated. To explain my centering process - I used to cone up and down to center and then I had more luck recently with pressing with the heel of my left palm on the side and with my right fist on top of the clay to center. It used to get centered under 2 minutes. But none of those methods are working at the moment. Ive struggled for 30-40 minutes at a stretch without any luck. Anyone face a similar problem? How did you solve it? Just to let you know - I have no personal problems or anything that are affecting this - and since my tutor wasnt able to center my clay as well im guessing its not related to anything going on internally with me. Maybe its my wedging? I dont know. Any ideas?
  11. howdy. I have been experimenting with low fire glaze that is safe for food use with stoneware clay. I am firing bisque at cone 05 and glaze firing to cone 05. My mugs look great and then I add in hot water and they start to craze. the craze is faint but, I can see lines. Should I bisque fire to 04 and keep glaze to 05? I have an old kiln so, I don't really want to use any high fire glazes so, this works best for me. Any advice will help.
  12. Bisque Stamps & Greenware Stamped-Mug

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    I have my share of commercially produced stamps (particularly logos and finely detailed items), but I still enjoy sitting in an easy chair with my feet-up and carving clay stamps to be used on various projects. It is an exercise of patience for me and a learning experience to be aware of when the clay tells me that its OK to carve/cut/trim. I've wondered before if an exhibit of clay artist's bisque stamps might be a fun thing to organize.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, Tennessee USA - All rights reserved.

  13. Brush-On Stoneware Glazes

    Hello! This may be a question that's a little silly, but I can't seem to find the answer anywhere. I've taken a liking to brushing on glazes on a banding wheel, as I've used earthenware clay/glazes for the majority of my time making pottery, and just recently decided to try a few different clay bodies and still intend to use brush-ons as much as I can. My question comes from the level of difficulty brushing 3 coats onto Cone 6 stoneware or porcelain (that has been fired and matured to Cone 6) brings, as It's not porous and takes a while for each coat to fully dry. As I've been looking at some different company glazes/glaze combinations and techniques (specifically Mayco), a lot of them have said to bisque fire to Cone 04, and then glaze fire to Cone 6 and it makes sense to me, but I still can't find it written anywhere definitively that that is the way to go about brushing on stoneware glazes. Is bisque firing stoneware or cone 6 porcelain to Cone 04 and then glaze firing to 6 a common practice when brushing on glazes or even dipping? Any information regarding this topic is greatly appreciated or any tips etc. about brush on stoneware glazes are also welcome! Thank you in advance!! Caden.
  14. House Wine 2 - Lid Close-up

    From the album Forum Discussion Images

    This is a close-up of the lid/stopper for the "House Wine" vessel. I like sneaking in some detail work on areas that don't show when the top is in place.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  15. House Wine 2

    From the album Forum Discussion Images

    This is the second "House Wine" vessel that I made. This time, underglaze transfers were added in an effort to build more depth to the surface. These are fun to make but seem to require a good bit of time on the workbench. This one is headed for a November show.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  16. House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  17. House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mug, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  18. House on the House on the... Image Transfers

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  19. House on the House...

    From the album Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  20. Turquoise And White Matt Foot Bowl

    From the album Ceramics Fall 2016

    Turquoise stone and white matte on a dark red clay body. I threw the foot separately and attached when leather hard. It is slightly off balance, but will look nice holding my mini hanging succulents in the garden.
  21. Now that I have my own studio and electric kiln, I'm moving from cone 10 clays to cone 5. This new world of mid-range clays, glazes, and firing is like starting all over again. I'm uncertain about whether cone 5/6 ceramics are correctly referred to as stoneware. Pretty sure that the term "earthenware" refers to low-fire ceramics, but I await the wisdom of those who know better about these things. :-)
  22. I have just poured the inside of a stoneware cylinder (test piece bisqued to 1000oC) with a transparent glaze that crawled horribly in a previous batch. This is a commercially mixed dipping glaze - very reliable by all accounts! Following advice here and elsewhere I let it stand and drew the excess water off the top. The glaze is now like pouring cream consistency. 100ml weighs 153g. I've poured the inside - about 3 seconds. As it dried the glaze cracked - see photo. What does this indicate? Can I just finger-sand it and dip the outside or am I destined for more disappointment?
  23. Hello, I'm Sarah and this is my first post. I hope I am posting correctly. I graduated from university in the UK two years ago from a mixed media degree where I specialised in Ceramics. Since graduation I have worked with a local potter as an apprentice and volunteered to wood fire with some potters. I have also been having one to one throwing tuition for over a year and getting to the stage of starting my own business and I have just purchased my first gas kiln. My website and blog are www.sarahgeeceramics.co.uk I am particularly looking for an apprenticeship or support somewhere to work in a ceramic community or directly with a potter that wood fires. I am very interested in learning these processes and would love the opportunity to develop. Does anyone know of any potters in Europe or places in Europe that wood fire and or gas fire ? And use throwing as their main production of ceramics? I would like to stay somewhere for a month or two ideally. Thanks so much for any help you can offer. Sarah
  24. Incense Cone Holder

    From the album LeeU June 2016

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