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Found 6 results

  1. I'm working with a clay that has a tendency to flop with little warning. From what little I know this can be a problem with plastic clay bodies holding more water than more forgiving, less plastic bodies. So with this in mind I'm looking at making adjustments but I'm getting conflicting information on what some accepted water content values are. Plainsman P700 has a % water of 23.5 - 24.5 Plainsman describes P700 as "our most vitreous cone 10 white body, it is the closest thing we have to a true translucent porcelain body. It is a mix of 50% Grolleg kaolin with feldspar and silica. We also add micro-fine bentonite to improve its plasticity." In the Febreuary Ceramics Monthly (thanks Tom) the water contents are significantly higher than the figures from Plainsman. I'm wondering are clays so different in the Unites States? I'm curious because the clay I'm working with holds aproximately 26% and is mixed up as a high fire, buff, stoneware. It works well for the most part. Fires to an 11 with no issues and kitchen tested absorption showed it was near zero at cone 10. But it doesn't stand up as well as the commercial Plainsman clays and I want to know why. thoughts much appreciated 20 epk 20 OM-4 ball clay 20 silica 20 custer potash feldspar 12 hawthorn Bond Clay 8 pv clay Percentage Analysis by weight 71.13 % SiO2 23.24 % Al2O3 3.06 % K2O 0.73 % Na2O 0.28 % CaO 0.32 % MgO 0.59 % Fe2O3 0.05 % P2O5 0.59 % TiO2
  2. Hello, I'm making and testing glazes in my hunt for a satin matt glaze. I came across this recipe by Tony Hansen, which sounds almost exactly what I'm after, but I'm not sure which silica to use. Apologies if its a basic question but I'm still relatively new to this! The recipe is here - https://digitalfire.com/4sight/recipes/cone_10_silky_dolomite_matte_base_glaze_39.html Then I am hoping to add oxides to make a black glaze, would anyone have any ideas of which oxides and how much? Many thanks!! Lauren
  3. Hi Guys, I am looking for answers everywhere........Maybe I will find it here......... I have mixed up a iron red glaze that I did not mix for a while. I used ingredients that is 10 years old and older. The end result was a flat brown instead of the rich red brown that it was before. I repeated the recipe, thinking I made a mistake, ending up with the same results. Then I thought maybe I used the wrong recipe and compared it with similar recipes getting to the conclusion that I did not make a mistake. So someone said the problem is the iron that changed over time. This was the first time I heard that in all the 36+ years I am in clay. Is that true and if so, can I fix the iron, or do I trash it? I assume that if that is true, it has to do with the oxidation process. Then someone mentioned the bone ash - artificial versus real, which raised the question with me if the bone ash may "expire", since I used the real thing. As I said: I used the exact same materials that I used on porcelain before. All these (except the silica and maybe the Custer) came from batches that I had in my studio for the best part of 15-18 years. (yes I have some valuable materials.....) The recipe is no secret, it is similar to many others available online, but the reason I want to do it again is because over time some of the plates that I glazed with it, wore off, which told me that there is maybe not enough silica in this recipe. So I want to alter it some, but first need to make sure I have the color right. Ralph’s Terracotta. Custer F. 41 Talc 9 Bone ash 13 Lith Carb. 2 Kentucky Ball clay 13 Silica 13 Add: Iron ox 9 Ideas please........... PorcelainbyAntoinette TeachinArt
  4. FYI for us potters: Note the magnitude of the standards decrease. http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/u-s-lowers-silica-dust-limit-first-time-45-years-n545201 best, ................john
  5. Hey guys and gals. I'm working on a white locally produced commercial claybody which is my favorite at the moment. I have 200 lbs of it to work through. It is only very lightly grogged. I am going to be doing some more testing with my own locally sourced lake clay but in the meantime I want to give this clay some more bite to it. Rather than grog, can I use silica sand or regular stream sand or something? I like the Korean's texture of the Maksabal which has just enough texture because they are using indigenous clay which is filled with impurities and is sieved leaving behind some of the bigger textured bits. Oh forgot to add that I am firing to cone 6 in oxidation.
  6. A few quick questions for the glaze experts out there. Background: I'm very excited to be creating my first base glazes - a simple cone 6 clear for a white (talc free) clay body. I also have a dark red clay body with obviously a high iron content. And then after that I will be going for a cream color glaze and then a temmoku. I have no real interest at the moment in bright glossy colors. I have 2 different options for silica - sand (white) and flint (270M) - Which is the best starting point or should I just get some of both? I want to give myself the most possibilities for testing and using in secondary glaze recipes. For the base white recipe I want to use it calls for Tin Oxide Tin Oxide vs Zircopax - Tin Oxide is REALLY expensive and I am reading a lot that Zircopax although it can be substituted at around 2:1 for Tin Oxide, it tends to kill the colors that oxides produce a bit. Not too big a problem for me I wouldn't think at the moment and none of the Temmoku I want to test calls for it. Does Zircopax work in a wide range of recipes and does it have any caveats to watch out for? Thanks much! Very excited to get going and will post results as I go.
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