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Found 24 results

  1. From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    The 5 pieces that I submitted for possible inclusion ion the "High Risk, High Reward" exhibition. The number of pieces in the show will depend on the curator's decisions about the overall exhibition "feel" in the gallery. Some will be in the show.... maybe all.
  2. “High Risk High Reward†Woodfiring the Fushigigama A group exhibition of selected works by the people who have participated in the firings of the New Hampshire Institute of Art's Fushigigama anagama-style kiln over the past 3 years. Work is included from faculty, undergrad and grad students, community education students, and some others who have been invited to fire work in the kiln. Fushigigama is an anagama style kiln designed by NHIA Professor John Baymore, and built by members of his kiln building class in a two week period during the summer of 2014. While still being an anagama-style unit, it is designed to have the ability to be fired smokeless and also with no plume of flame at the top of the chimney. "We’re fired up for this breathtaking display of works fired in NHIA’s Fushigigama woodkiln at our Sharon Campus. This is a celebration of our emerging local woodfiring community as they share their excitement about the dynamic work that can come from this enigmatic firing practice. As the process of firing the Fushigigama is a long, complex and demanding endeavor; it is necessarily a collective effort, bringing together a diverse range of creative ideas and exchanges. A broad group of students, faculty, alumnae, and local artists have created engaging functional and sculptural ceramic works all fired in the Fushigigama. The work and the overall exhibition demonstrate an elegant balance of the individual creative process with the mark of the fire and the collaborative nature of woodfiring large kilns." This exhibition is free, open to the public and handicap accessible. For more information contact exhibitions@nhia.edu. The exhibition is scheduled to open at the Sharon Arts Center Gallery, in Peterborough, NH on August 18th from 5-7 PM, and runs through September 17th. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm, Sunday 11am-4pm Sharon Arts Gallery 30 Grove Street Peterborough, NH
  3. Charcoal Introduced at End of Firing

    From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    Hardwood charcoal is introduced on top of the wares on the last step of Fushigigama once the stoking is complete...at about cone 12-13. Then the kiln is sealed up and the burning charcoal causes reduction cooling effects. The charcoal tends to pop and sizzle into sparks....which you see in this clip.
  4. Charcoaling Rear Step of Fushigigama

    From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    The last step of Fushigigama has ports to introduce hardwood charcoal (not charcoal briquettes!) directly onto the load of ware. This is done at the peak of the firing just after ceasing stoking wood and just before sealing up the kiln. Here you can see the general process.
  5. From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    View in one of the side stoke ports during the firing. Note the wood laying right on the pieces.
  6. Fushigigama EarlyFiring Summer2017

    From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    The early stage of the summer 2017 Fushigigama firing.
  7. FushigigamaLoad Summer2017

    From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    Front step loading of the summer 2017 firing of Fushigigama.
  8. I've just posted some selected images from the May 2017 Commencement and the BFA end-of-year student exhibition at New Hampshire Institute of Art in my gallery section for anyone who might be interested. This year's class graduating in May (as opposed to January) was a small one for us. best, ..................john
  9. From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    This handbuilt bottle form shows the marks left by Josh Query's "manmade "seashells". The mix is 50% plaster, 50% whiting, and salt water to mix the stuff up with. Josh wanted shapes of marks that were more rectilinear than what naturally happens with scallop shells. Was fired in the spring 2017 firing of New Hampshire Institute of Art's #Fushigigama. Was in the last rear stack of shelves.

    © 2017 - Josh Query -all rights reserved

  10. Breaking the Mold: A Collaborative Exhibition with Tokyo University of the Arts. This show features more than 50 works of contemporary ceramic art forms created by faculty and students of the Tokyo University of the Arts (Geidai). Colby-Sawyer College, and guest works by faculty and students from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire Institute of Art, and John Stark Regional High School. The exhibition remains open through Tuesday, Nov. 1. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibition made possible by Colby Sawyer College Cultural Events Committee, The Fulbright Commission, and Tokyo University of the Arts. Included Artists: Chris Archer Michael Bacote Loretta Barnett John Baymore Jon Chu Dave Ernster Bess French Ryder Gordon Brenna Gourgeot Sarah Heimann Taku Higuchi Riho Kawachi Jon Keenan Hattie Ketchen Eric Maglio Ryo Mikami Maureen Mills Lauren Morrocco Riisa Ohgi Karen Orsillo Ben Putnam Takato Sasaki Aasuka Shikiba Saki Shinizu Jenny Swanson Yuko Takahashi Makoto Toyofuku Naoki Yamamoto Colby-Sawyer College Colby-Sawyer College is located in New London, N.H. in the heart of the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region, known for the natural beauty of its lakes and mountains. The campus is just minutes from Interstate 89, which runs from Concord, N.H. to Burlington, Vt. and into Canada. Traveling North on I-89Exit 11 - Right off of exit to New London. Proceed one mile and turn left onto Rt. 114/Main St. College will be on your right as you enter town. Traveling South on I-89Exit 12 - Left off of exit to New London. Follow Newport Rd. about 2.5 miles through town. You will travel through a roundabout approximately 2 miles down Newport Road; take the second exit on the roundabout (straight) and continue on Newport Road. Bear right onto Main St./114, follow another mile. College will be on your left. http://colby-sawyer.edu/
  11. For anyone who is interested, here is the curriculum plan for a ceramics BFA degree through New Hampshire Institute of Art. http://www.nhia.edu/~/media/files/catalog-info-brochures/nhia_curriculum_bfa-ceramics.pdf?la=en best, ........................john
  12. Smokeless Anagama NHIA 2014

    From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    Anagama built in 2 weeks during the summer of 2014 by students in my kiln design and operation class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. It fires completely smokeless and flameless at the top of the chimney.

    © 2014 John Baymore

  13. Smokeless Anagama NHIA 2014

    From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    Anagama built in 2 weeks during the summer of 2014 by students in my kiln design and operation class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. It fires completely smokeless and flameless at the top of the chimney.

    © 2014 John Baymore

  14. Smokeless Anagama NHIA 2014

    From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    Anagama built in 2 weeks during the summer of 2014 by students in my kiln design and operation class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. It fires completely smokeless and flameless at the top of the chimney.

    © 2014 John Baymore

  15. Smokeless Anagama NHIA 2014

    From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    Anagama built in 2 weeks during the summer of 2014 by students in my kiln design and operation class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. It fires completely smokeless and flameless at the top of the chimney.

    © 2014 John Baymore

  16. Smokeless Anagama NHIA 2014

    From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    Anagama built in 2 weeks during the summer of 2014 by students in my kiln design and operation class at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. It fires completely smokeless and flameless at the top of the chimney.

    © 2014 John Baymore

  17. History of Japanese Ceramics New Hampshire Institute of Art Sharon Art Center Campus CER051 Nov 3 – Dec 8, 2015 (6 weeks) Tuesdays, 6 – 7:30pm Professor John Baymore $149 This series of slide lectures will explore the cultural context in which this art form developed and currently thrives, including the impact of geography, deeply held Shinto and Buddhist beliefs, the lifestyle of the Samurai class, and the impact of the Tea Ceremony on the art. We will look at the production of the Six Ancient Kilns, the Mingei Movement, the work of the Living National Treasures, and look at contemporary trends as new artist-potters throw off the shackles of centuries of tradition. Finally, we will look at how Japanese ceramics had an impact on contemporary American artist-potter’s work, and how Abstract Expressionism impacted the Japanese ceramists. (This is a bit similar in content to the full credit-bearing degree level course bearing the same course title. Without the heavy readings, papers, and exams!) Prerequisite: None To register BY PHONE: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836-2564 IN PERSON: Manchester Campus: Mon – Fri, 8:15 am – 4:30 pm Fuller Hall, 156 Hanover St. Sharon Arts Campus: Mon – Fri, 9 am – 3 pm 457 NH Route 123, Sharon, NH BY EMAIL: CERegistration@nhia.edu ONLINE: www.nhia.edu/ceregister BY MAIL: New Hampshire Institute of Art Continuing Education Office 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104-4858
  18. Anagama Wood Firing Workshop with John Baymore April 1 – 5, 2015; Unloading on April 12, 2 015 SCER084 Sharon Arts Campus of the New Hampshire Institute of Art, Sharon, NH Come fire your ceramic work in our new anagama kiln! This past summer, we built an anagama kiln on the Sharon Arts Center campus. This past fall, we fired the kiln for the first time and achieved wonderful results. This spring we are excited to offer an immersive workshop. The Anagama Workshop is an opportunity to learn the intricacies of wood-firing through hands-on experience with a large anagama. With the guidance of master wood-fire artist, John Baymore, students will prepare, load, fire, and unload the anagama kiln. John will also lead various presentations and discussions about the process and history of wood-firing. The first two days of the workshop will focus on glazing, wadding, and loading the ware into the anagama, with consideration of the forms going in and the path of the flame during the firing. The kiln will then be fired in shifts around the clock for three days as it reaches 2400 degrees. Participants will serve on 3 shifts at various times of the firing. As the firing progresses, discussion will focus on what changes are happening in the flow of the kiln and with the ware inside. Unloading the kiln, there will be review and reflection on the results and impact of the making, stacking and firing. Participants in the Anagama Workshop will bring work to the kiln and be able to have approximately 8 square feet of ware in the firing. For those that want to have work in the anagama kiln but do not want to take the workshop, there is limited space available. If you are interested in either level of participation (the 5-day Anagama Workshop, or having work in the firing), or for detailed workshop information and costs, contact: Maureen Mills, Chairperson, NHIA Ceramic Dept., mmills@nhia.edu or (603) 836-2565. http://www.nhia.edu/assets/NHIA630CEwtr-spr15web.pdf New Hampshire Institute of Art Continuing Education Office 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104-4858
  19. Some people asked me to keep some updates here on out progress. So...... here are a couple of shots of the first two days of the build: Day One Day Two More to come in this thread. Check back every day or so if you are interested. best, .................john
  20. Making Handbuilt Chawan The formal Japanese Tea Ceremony (Chanoyu) has had a profound impact on both the Japanese and world ceramics since the feudal era in Japan. The making of formal tea bowls (Chawan) is considered the pinnacle of the art of the potter in Japan. This six-session class will share two specific hand-forming techniques for the making of Chawan. It also will explore the “rules†for desired formal attributes of a Chawan within the context of real Chanoyu. A discussion of the formal Chanoyu process will be included, and we will conclude our classes by sharing Matcha (i.e. ceremony tea) out of the bowls we have made in a semi-formal Tea Ceremony in which the class participants get to be both hosts and guests. Prerequisite: Basic clay skills. Limit: 10 Manchester, NH Campus Professor John Baymore MCER058 Wed, Oct. 1 – Nov. 5 7 – 9:50 PM & 9-5 PM tea ceremony on Sat, Nov. 8 6 Weeks & 1 Saturday / Amherst/Williams Building 204 Tuition: $154 / Material Fee: $20 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS: Chris Archer (603) 836.2561 carcher@nhia.edu TO REGISTER FOR A CLASS: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836.2564 CERegistration@nhia.edu LOCATIONS: Manchester Campus New Hampshire Institute of Art 148 Concord Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858 www.nhia.edu
  21. Ceramics Open Studio This course is the perfect opportunity for intermediate to advanced level potter's to work independently, with NHIA faculty member John Baymore on-hand for guidance. Students will receive personal help for on the wheel and in handbuilding, glazing, and firing. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Wheelwork and Handbuilding. Limit: 12 Manchester Campus Professor John Baymore MCER004 Mon, Sep. 15 – Dec. 1 7 – 9:50 pm 12 Weeks / Amherst/Williams 001 Tuition: $264 / Material Fee: $25 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS: Chris Archer (603) 836.2561 carcher@nhia.edu TO REGISTER FOR A CLASS: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836.2564 CERegistration@nhia.edu LOCATIONS: Manchester Campus New Hampshire Institute of Art 148 Concord Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858 www.nhia.edu
  22. Kiln Building Intensive For students who want a hands-on experience to learn more about kiln design and building, this is the class for you. Master kiln builder John Baymore will lead this intensive course beginning with two evening lectures about kiln theory, design, and construction. The class then switches gears, as the students then spend two full days building a gas fired kiln in the NHIA Manchester kiln room. Bring work gloves and a respirator and prepare to get your hands dirty! Prerequisite: Basic clay skills. Limit: 10 Manchester Campus Professor John Baymore MCER077 Thu & Fri, Sep. 25 & 26 / 6 – 9 pm; Sat & Sun, Sep. 27 28 / 9 am – 6 pm 4 Days / Thu. + Fri. Amherst/Williams 204; Sat. + Sun. Amherst/Williams 001 Tuition: $176 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS: Chris Archer (603) 836.2561 carcher@nhia.edu TO REGISTER FOR A CLASS: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836.2564 CERegistration@nhia.edu LOCATIONS: Manchester Campus New Hampshire Institute of Art 148 Concord Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858 www.nhia.
  23. ClayFest 2014 Saturday, August 30 10 am – 4pm Sharon Art Center Campus of New Hampshire Institute of Art 457 NH Rt 123, Sharon, NH Admission is free and open to the public. JOIN US FOR FOOD, LIVE DEMONSTRATIONS, DROP-IN WORKSHOPS, CERAMIC WARES FOR SALE and SEE THE ANAGAMA KILN PROJECT. We are proud to have a Japanese-style wood-fired Anagama Kiln being built in late August under the direction of Professor John Baymore and constructed by his BFA kiln building class. This large wood kiln will be a new and wonderful creative resource to the region with a launch of its first firing in the Fall of 2014. For more information on CLAYFEST: www.sharonarts.org CONTACT (603) 836-2564 New Hampshire Institute of Art 148 Concord Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858 www.nhia.edu Sharon Arts Center 457 NH Rte. 123, Sharon, NH 03458 www.sharonarts.org
  24. Come "pick my brains" in the ceramics studio on Monday evenings this fall/early winter at New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, NH. The Open Studio format I've been doing for many years is basically like having a group of people all individually doing "Independent Study" approaches. This community education class is open to non-matriculated undergraduate or graduate students. (This class is not suitable for beginning students.) Ceramics Open Studio This course is the perfect opportunity for intermediate to advanced level ceramists to work independently with John Baymore on-hand for guidance. Students will receive personal help on the wheel and in handbuilding, glazing, and firing. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Wheelworking or Fundamentals of Handbuilding, their equivalent, or permission of instructor. Limit: 12 MCER004/B Mon, Sept. 23 – Dec. 16 7 – 9:50 pm / 12 Weeks Amherst Building 001 Tuition: $264 / Studio Fee: $25 New Hampshire Institute of Art http://www.nhia.edu/community-education-home
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