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Found 5 results

  1. From the album Images For Misc. Posts

    The 5 pieces that I submitted for possible inclusion ion the "High Risk, High Reward" exhibition. The number of pieces in the show will depend on the curator's decisions about the overall exhibition "feel" in the gallery. Some will be in the show.... maybe all.
  2. “High Risk High Reward†Woodfiring the Fushigigama A group exhibition of selected works by the people who have participated in the firings of the New Hampshire Institute of Art's Fushigigama anagama-style kiln over the past 3 years. Work is included from faculty, undergrad and grad students, community education students, and some others who have been invited to fire work in the kiln. Fushigigama is an anagama style kiln designed by NHIA Professor John Baymore, and built by members of his kiln building class in a two week period during the summer of 2014. While still being an anagama-style unit, it is designed to have the ability to be fired smokeless and also with no plume of flame at the top of the chimney. "We’re fired up for this breathtaking display of works fired in NHIA’s Fushigigama woodkiln at our Sharon Campus. This is a celebration of our emerging local woodfiring community as they share their excitement about the dynamic work that can come from this enigmatic firing practice. As the process of firing the Fushigigama is a long, complex and demanding endeavor; it is necessarily a collective effort, bringing together a diverse range of creative ideas and exchanges. A broad group of students, faculty, alumnae, and local artists have created engaging functional and sculptural ceramic works all fired in the Fushigigama. The work and the overall exhibition demonstrate an elegant balance of the individual creative process with the mark of the fire and the collaborative nature of woodfiring large kilns." This exhibition is free, open to the public and handicap accessible. For more information contact exhibitions@nhia.edu. The exhibition is scheduled to open at the Sharon Arts Center Gallery, in Peterborough, NH on August 18th from 5-7 PM, and runs through September 17th. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm, Sunday 11am-4pm Sharon Arts Gallery 30 Grove Street Peterborough, NH
  3. Breaking the Mold: A Collaborative Exhibition with Tokyo University of the Arts. This show features more than 50 works of contemporary ceramic art forms created by faculty and students of the Tokyo University of the Arts (Geidai). Colby-Sawyer College, and guest works by faculty and students from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire Institute of Art, and John Stark Regional High School. The exhibition remains open through Tuesday, Nov. 1. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibition made possible by Colby Sawyer College Cultural Events Committee, The Fulbright Commission, and Tokyo University of the Arts. Included Artists: Chris Archer Michael Bacote Loretta Barnett John Baymore Jon Chu Dave Ernster Bess French Ryder Gordon Brenna Gourgeot Sarah Heimann Taku Higuchi Riho Kawachi Jon Keenan Hattie Ketchen Eric Maglio Ryo Mikami Maureen Mills Lauren Morrocco Riisa Ohgi Karen Orsillo Ben Putnam Takato Sasaki Aasuka Shikiba Saki Shinizu Jenny Swanson Yuko Takahashi Makoto Toyofuku Naoki Yamamoto Colby-Sawyer College Colby-Sawyer College is located in New London, N.H. in the heart of the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region, known for the natural beauty of its lakes and mountains. The campus is just minutes from Interstate 89, which runs from Concord, N.H. to Burlington, Vt. and into Canada. Traveling North on I-89Exit 11 - Right off of exit to New London. Proceed one mile and turn left onto Rt. 114/Main St. College will be on your right as you enter town. Traveling South on I-89Exit 12 - Left off of exit to New London. Follow Newport Rd. about 2.5 miles through town. You will travel through a roundabout approximately 2 miles down Newport Road; take the second exit on the roundabout (straight) and continue on Newport Road. Bear right onto Main St./114, follow another mile. College will be on your left. http://colby-sawyer.edu/
  4. Anagama Wood Firing Workshop with John Baymore April 1 – 5, 2015; Unloading on April 12, 2 015 SCER084 Sharon Arts Campus of the New Hampshire Institute of Art, Sharon, NH Come fire your ceramic work in our new anagama kiln! This past summer, we built an anagama kiln on the Sharon Arts Center campus. This past fall, we fired the kiln for the first time and achieved wonderful results. This spring we are excited to offer an immersive workshop. The Anagama Workshop is an opportunity to learn the intricacies of wood-firing through hands-on experience with a large anagama. With the guidance of master wood-fire artist, John Baymore, students will prepare, load, fire, and unload the anagama kiln. John will also lead various presentations and discussions about the process and history of wood-firing. The first two days of the workshop will focus on glazing, wadding, and loading the ware into the anagama, with consideration of the forms going in and the path of the flame during the firing. The kiln will then be fired in shifts around the clock for three days as it reaches 2400 degrees. Participants will serve on 3 shifts at various times of the firing. As the firing progresses, discussion will focus on what changes are happening in the flow of the kiln and with the ware inside. Unloading the kiln, there will be review and reflection on the results and impact of the making, stacking and firing. Participants in the Anagama Workshop will bring work to the kiln and be able to have approximately 8 square feet of ware in the firing. For those that want to have work in the anagama kiln but do not want to take the workshop, there is limited space available. If you are interested in either level of participation (the 5-day Anagama Workshop, or having work in the firing), or for detailed workshop information and costs, contact: Maureen Mills, Chairperson, NHIA Ceramic Dept., mmills@nhia.edu or (603) 836-2565. http://www.nhia.edu/assets/NHIA630CEwtr-spr15web.pdf New Hampshire Institute of Art Continuing Education Office 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104-4858
  5. Yes, Clay Can Take You Around the World: Experiencing Korea and China Slide Presentation by John Baymore, NHIA Ceramics Faculty In this evening slide talk, ceramics department faculty member John Baymore will discuss his recent experiences in the Far East. In the first half, he will show images from the spring 2012 MunGyeong Chasabal (teabowl) Festival in South Korea, where John was an invited demonstrating artist and in which his work won the Silver Prize. The second half will cover his experiences as an invited lecturer at the Yixing Ceramics and Culture Festival in Yixing, People’s Republic of China in the spring of 2013, where he was awarded a Guest Professorship at the Wuxi Institute of Art and Technology. Watch for this Asian focused program to be continued early next semester with an additional presentation on John’s summer spent working in Japan in 2013. This FREE presentation is open to both the NHIA Community and the general public. There will be an opportunity after the presentation for informal discussion and to see some ceramic work John brought back from China and Korea. WHEN: Wednesday November 20th 6PM WHERE: NHIA Ceramics Department Lower Level, 77 Amherst St. Manchester, NH Parking available on the street or in the lot on Concord Street. JohnBaymore-KoreaChinaLecture2013flyer.pdf
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