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Found 36 results

  1. So, ive created this account specifically for help! ive been given two very old electric kilns, seems to be from the 70s perhaps? anyways, one is an American Beauty electric kiln model number: AB18 this thing has four switches and a kiln sitter. seems to be in relatively good condition from what my ceramic instructor had said. Problem is ive never fired a kiln and there is almost zero information on the kilns manual or even the company that produced the kiln. I find that almost unbelievable seeing as I live 5 miles from the city the kiln company was located. If anyone has any further information of this specific model of kiln that would help immensely !! Next, I have a Cress electric kiln model number : B-23-HB ive found an online manual for the company kilns but they're all for up-to-date kilns.. This model has a upper and lower nobs for high and low firing. anyone have any ideas because im totally fresh to anything in regards to firing kilns. is it worth keeping or should I try to get a more updated kiln? Help! thank you in advance!
  2. Week 42 The preferable method of casting a catenary arch kiln is to use the casting material on the: Outside of the form upside down. on the outside of the form right side up. on the inside of the form right side up. on the inside of the form upside down. The project casting in the book used a mix that was: hand mixed sand, vermiculite, clay and concrete hand mixed commercial Vari-Form B commercial Carborundum's LDS Moldable hand mixed sawdust, pea grog, clay, and cement Three things can be done to improve the strength and working properties of the casting mix: application of a heavy coating of ceramic-fiber liquid cement upon the interior surface of the cured casting; embedding lath wire one inch into the center of the tamping mix during application onto the arch form; and the use of_________________ instead of water. 50/50 water and dish detergent 50/50 sodium silicate and water colloidal-silica liquid mortar set liquid The ______________ brick is the load-bearing brick which takes the thrust from the completed arch. Keystone channel arch skew This weeks Pottery Quiz of the Week questions come from: Kiln Building with Spage-Age Materials, Frank A. Colson, c. 1975, Van Norstrand Reinhold Company, New York,NY Note from Pres: Always interested in kilns and firing, this book seemed appropriate for the Space Age, and from an energy-efficient standpoint. After all, we were having problems with petroleum fuels at the time, and many were changing over to electric, or insulating their kilns more for greater efficiency.
  3. Hi - I was doing a glaze fire to cone 5 last night, and due to a dumb mistake on my part, the kiln shut off an hour too early. My question is this: can I save these pots by refiring them to the correct temperature? Can I do this without reglazing them? Is it even worth it? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
  4. Week 41 A kiln design that contains the walls and the arch in one curve is the________________ kiln. Sprung arch Bound arch Catenary arch Barrel arch Domes and Crowns differ from sprung arches in that an arch describes a portion of a cylinder, while a dome or crown describes a portion of a _____________. parabola sphere hyperbola cone One Principle of kiln design the author states is that the chimney is approximately one-fourth to one-fifth of the ____________________ diameter. chamber damper door total inlet An _______________________ kiln is an example of a _________________ type kiln. Down-draft anagama cross-draft updraft This weeks Pottery Quiz of the Week questions come from: The Kiln Book, second edition, Frederick L. Olsen, c. 1983, Chilton Book Company/Radnor, PA Note from Pres: In the 80's as a new art teacher, new to ceramics, I considered building my own kiln. Alas, it did not happen, but I read a lot of books on kiln building, firing, and repairs. Some of which I have used over the years, some not. However, for anyone starting with kiln construction this book is a gem. There may be newer techniques out there today, but he does cover Fiber construction, alternative fuels, and multi chambered kilns. Answer Key: 3. Catenary arch-from the text.Pp. 35 2. Sphere—from the text Pp.36 1. chamber-from the text Pp61 Principle 6 2. anagama, 3. cross-draft-Crossdraft kilns originated in the Orient. The exact location and time is impossible to determine, but it is probably safe to assume that China, Korea, and Japan simultaneously developed similar crossdraft kilns known as bank or hole kilns. The hole kilns were in use during the Asuka period in Japan, the Sui period in China, and the Silla period in Korea. In Japan they were called Anagama, ana meaning hole or cavity and gama meaning kiln.
  5. Week 37 I realize that this book may be out of date with the newer technologies, but it may be a place spur further discussion with those of you who have first person experience building kilns. In the 20th century there were two great debates about refractories for kilns. The first of these involved the use of hard brick vs. ______________________. The second of these involved the use of insulating firebrick vs.________________________. ceramic fiber, hard brick ceramic fiber, cast insulation insulating firebrick, ceramic fiber cast insulation, hard brick Two considerations that affect the shape of the kiln are: (1) the size and shape of the ware to be fired, and (2) ___________________________. available studio space shelf dimensions kiln pad size door size There are basically two types of burners: Inspirator type, which relies on the gas pressure to entrain and mix the air as it emerges from the orifice; ______________type that relieds on a blower or forced air system to entrain the gas. Respirator Instigator Aspirator Orator There are two basic wall-construction systems utilizing ceramic fiber: (1) Layered or wallpaper systems, and (2) ___________________ systems. Edge Cast block Bound fiberfax This weeks questions come from The Energy-Efficient Potter, Regis C. Brodie, c 1982, Watson Guptill Publications, NY NY Note from Pres: There was a day when I had thought that I would be building a fuel burning kiln. As I had always been into researching a decision before jumping into it, I read several books that I bought and borrowed on kiln construction. As I live in a small town with little in the way of surrounding land, and close to what was downtown. It never happened, the dream changed. However, I still have a number of kiln building books. Answers: These questions and answers are again directly from text. 3. insulating firebrick, ceramic fiber 2. shelf dimensions 3. Aspirator 1. Edge
  6. I'm self-taught and a relative newbie. I am so confused about glaze & bisque firing in terms of venting, peep holes, and/or cracking the lid. I have an electric kiln with digital controller and it's outside so I have no extra ventilating system. My Evenheat kiln has one small hole in the top that does not have a plug (always open) and one side peephole with a plug. 1)when bisque firing, does the lid need to be cracked and/or the peephole open for any part of the firing? 2)when glaze firing, same questions? Thank you for any insights.
  7. susieblue

    L&l Vs Skutt

    I am looking into buying a new kiln and have narrowed it down to two models that can work for my purposes, The Easy-Fire 23s by L&L or the Skutt KM1018. Both are the same price with the accompanying furniture kits. Both would be supplied with their standard model controllers. Dyna-trol vs Kilnmaster. I have a 60amp breaker and my electrician brother is wiring a new outlet for me (the old kiln was hardwired). At first I thought the L&L was a shoe-in because of the element holders but now I see that Skutt has their own rebuttal to this claiming that the heat distribution in their kilns is better because it isn't limited by the kiln element holders https://skutt.com/features/pdf/L%20_L%20response.pdf. I really am not sure what to think. I realize that some of it is simply subjective but not being able to actually experience these models first-hand I am at the mercy of the oh-so-fickle internet. Are there more linear feet of coils in a Skutt? Are the element holders of an L&L a help or a hinderance? are there other glaring differences I should know about? I would appreciate any insights potters here may have regarding these two models, especially those who have experienced both manufacturers' (pref recent) products. Thank you.
  8. I have a Skutt KM822 I have been firing since I bought it new in March 2013. I fire to cone 6 in it. Lately I have noticed a change in when the relays "click." Let me preface by saying the firing I did last week I got error code 1. Kiln stalled out at 2177. I fire to 2210 with a 10 min hold. It was a very hot day when I did this firing, was mid afternoon when the error code 1 came on. I have multiple fans going to move air around in my kiln shed. I did diagnostic test and for amp, voltage. All OK. I also did a test fire of the kiln to 1100 with a 30 min hold and checked every peephole to see if elements all on. They were and I heard relays clicking the entire firing. OK..here is the issue. I just completed another cone 6 firing. I do ramp/hold program. Modified from one I saw online here in this forum. All are degrees Fahrenheit 150 to 250 degrees no hold 400 to 1900 no hold 130 to 2210 Hold 10-13 min. This firing I heard the relays clicking at the beginning. When I checked at 1700 degress no clicking but the temp rising. Checked again at 1923 and I hear clicking relays. Checked again at 2127 no relays sounds but the temp rising. I didn't hear the relays click again until I was in the hold at the end. The temp during the hold rose to 2217 and then the relays began clicking and the temp dropped to 2210. I have fired a manual Skutt for decades, so digital is foreign to me still. I will probably call Skutt this week, but curious if this sounds normal or not to those of you who have more digital firing experience than I do. Appreciate any insight!
  9. I have a new-ish L&L E23T kiln with 3" brick; one of the reasons I chose it was its ability to fire to cone 10. Now it seems that I might want to actually start to do that once in a while—I will mostly use it for bisque and cone 5/6. The motivation to do this is that since I left my last membership studio, I had a small load of cone 10 work gas fired at a friends studio, where I can also use her glazes. Despite the very reasonable $.05 per cu. inch cost, this load cost me $72—more than what two full kiln loads would cost in my electric kiln, and almost double what the friend said it cost in gas for one firing in her kiln! Obviously, that is not sustainable. I know I can't achieve the things I could with cone 10 reduction, but I will limit the firings to what will be happy in oxidation—matte and gloss white, matte black, crawl glaze, and Heino and/or Laguna turquoise. Any advice or words of wisdom about cone 10 electric firing? I'm very new to doing my own firing. I've included a pic of the spectacular Heino glaze from that last gas firing mentioned above; if I could anything close to this in electric oxidation I'd be a very happy potter!
  10. Okay, so I really pulled a goofy one this last firing. Had everything in glaze load, loaded up water smoked a bit to keep morning made cone pack from blowing up and to allow the recently glazed pots to dry up. It comes to 12 midnight, and decision time. I know it won't be anywhere near ready til early morning if I fie it to all switches(3) on ten, probably 5 am. I decided to put the bottom on 10, Mid to 9, and the top to 7. All this figuring to fire a little on all at 10 when I got up at 7. Next morning 7 out to the kiln, cone 5, 6, and 7 are down. Can't really tell how bad, but glow is not white still yellow orange. 24 hours later, I unload and find that one teapot lid is glued on, another lid that did not get fired on the pot is glued to the shelf, but other than some darker earthier colors, all is good. Definitely a potentially bad situation came in OK, Lucky me! This got me to thinking about my cone packs, and how I am the last of a really gone breed. Still firing with cone packs in an electric kiln. Got me also to thinking that maybe someone would like to see what my cone pack looks like. You can see the standard fire I do in the middle, the one on the right is Wednesday nights, and the one on the left is one I made at the same time as Wednesday for the next load. best, Pres
  11. I am looking for tips on where to sell a large kiln. Craigslist seems good for kilns you can pack into the back of an SUV but I never see kilns of this size for sale (at least not in the Atlanta area). Are there any sites that cater to professional potters I should post to? This is the kiln, but mine is older and does not have a controller, it just uses a kiln sitter. http://www.sheffield-pottery.com/FL-20-FRONT-LOADING-OLYMPIC-KILN-p/olfl20.htm
  12. estalker@hotmail.com

    Kiln Room Ventilation?

    I am in the process of renovating a building for my studio. I am using a room in the basement for my electric kilns. There is a good sized window that is boarded up in that room. I have a kiln vent for one of my kilns, but I thought it might be beneficial to ventilate the room by installing some sort of exhaust fan in the window space. My contractor is suggesting an attic vent. This sounds like overkill and might be too noisy. Any suggestions based experience? Thanks! Elisa Stone
  13. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A wood fired climbing kiln that was fired in the Longwood Avenue section of Brookline (part of Boston) for many years. Afterburners on the chimney controlled the smoke outside the kiln building.

    © john baymore -all rigthts reserved

  14. Guest

    Crossdraft Propane Fired Gas Kiln

    From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A small propane fired sprung catenary arch crossdraft kiln.

    © John baymore -all rights reserved

  15. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A natural gas fired downdraft soda kiln constructed at a workshop I gave at the Harvard University Ceramics Program.

    © john baymore -all rights reserved

  16. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A small Bizen-style climbing kiln.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  17. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A propane fired gas kiln with a hinged door constructed at the Silvermine Art School in CT.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  18. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A crossdraft propane fired gas kiln.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  19. Guest

    40 Cubic Foot Gas Kiln Plan Example

    From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    And example of one page of gas kiln plans.

    © john baymore -all rights reserved

  20. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A propane gas fired car kiln built in a workshop held in Virginia.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  21. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A propane gas fired car kiln built in a workshop held in Virginia.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  22. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A rear-fired natural gas downdraft kiln.

    © John Baymore - all rights reserved

  23. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    The five chamber noborigama located at River Bend Pottery constructed 1980.

    © 2010 John Baymore -all rights reserved

  24. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A kiln building workshop I ran for the NH Potters Guild for building a combination wood fired and also gas fired crossdraft kiln. Here, the kiln is being built in the early stages.

    © John Baymore - all rights reserved

  25. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A large 'hybrid' design of a Japanese anagama and a US southestern groundhog kiln concept built in Japan.

    © 2009 J. Baymore - all rights reserved

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