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Found 22 results

  1. Partially Melted Middle Jomon Shards

    From the album Images For Misc. Posts

  2. Have you seen these NHK sponsored video series on Youtube?! Both braincandy and educational, I can't stop watching them. I've spam-watched maybe a dozen of the pottery videos and other things like kimono dyeing and lacquering wood and on and on. Stumbled across this stuff by accident yesterday and they're just awesome to put it mildly. Love of the Arts is just a whole different animal in Japan. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=core+kyoto+nhk
  3. I'm a professional potter looking for a month-long, hands on experience within a Japanese tradional pottery. I want to live on-site. Guess I'm looking for a residency but if any of you have experience in this I'd like to here from you. I am particularly interested in shinoware.
  4. Hi, I would like to ask tips and tricks on finding in Japan a ready made, very plasticity porcelain body which is translucent and white white. I have searched several pottery website and finding Arita porcelain clay body and Kutani. I have no idea which one. Since I'm new here, I thought other people with more experience might have some tips for me. Also if you have any tips on what I should not miss in Japan, it is more then welcome. Thank you so much!
  5. From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A large 'hybrid' design of a Japanese anagama and a US southestern groundhog kiln concept built in Japan.

    © 2009 J. Baymore - all rights reserved

  6. From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A large 'hybrid' design of a Japanese anagama and a US southestern groundhog kiln concept built in Japan. (Just behind it in the background of the image is a large X type crossdraft kiln built by Fred Olsen.)

    © 2009 J. Baymore - all rights reserved

  7. From the album Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A single chamber wood fired kiln that was built in Japan at a workshop which I led there in 2006. It is designed to be used for the youhen charcoal finishing process, and you can see the charcoal ports in the wall in the front. It shares a large chimney with a large 5 chamber noborigama (seen behind it). It is fired on a 3 day cycle to 1250 C and then all the ware is buried in wood charcoal for the cooling cycle. This process is heavily used in Bizen. The dubbed this kiln the "Johngama" ( ジョン窯 ) .

    © 2006 John Baymore -all rights reserved

  8. History of Japanese Ceramics New Hampshire Institute of Art Sharon Art Center Campus CER051 Nov 3 – Dec 8, 2015 (6 weeks) Tuesdays, 6 – 7:30pm Professor John Baymore $149 This series of slide lectures will explore the cultural context in which this art form developed and currently thrives, including the impact of geography, deeply held Shinto and Buddhist beliefs, the lifestyle of the Samurai class, and the impact of the Tea Ceremony on the art. We will look at the production of the Six Ancient Kilns, the Mingei Movement, the work of the Living National Treasures, and look at contemporary trends as new artist-potters throw off the shackles of centuries of tradition. Finally, we will look at how Japanese ceramics had an impact on contemporary American artist-potter’s work, and how Abstract Expressionism impacted the Japanese ceramists. (This is a bit similar in content to the full credit-bearing degree level course bearing the same course title. Without the heavy readings, papers, and exams!) Prerequisite: None To register BY PHONE: Rhiannon Mimms (603) 836-2564 IN PERSON: Manchester Campus: Mon – Fri, 8:15 am – 4:30 pm Fuller Hall, 156 Hanover St. Sharon Arts Campus: Mon – Fri, 9 am – 3 pm 457 NH Route 123, Sharon, NH BY EMAIL: CERegistration@nhia.edu ONLINE: www.nhia.edu/ceregister BY MAIL: New Hampshire Institute of Art Continuing Education Office 148 Concord Street Manchester, NH 03104-4858
  9. Hello hello, I am moving to Tokyo (North East of the city) next October for at least a year, and I'm looking for places to make ceramics. I was thinking I could try to find an apprenticeship there but I've heard that usually the apprentice doesn't make anything for a while, but rather helps doing small things such as cleaning. Is it true? Even though it is also interesting, I need to have my hands in the clay. So then I looked for studios where I could practice or take lessons but all the places I found semmed to have only courses for once a week. But I'm looking for a place where I could go at least 3 or 4 times a week. So I was wondering if any of you have any idea of where to look, or just advices? Thank you!
  10. Hello,
 
 I thought that maybe some of you could be pleased to discover the work of contemporary artist and ceramist Yohei Nishimura, if you don't already know it. 
 Cooked at 1200 degrees, miraculously “fossilized†by the magic of the electric kiln acting like a time accelerator, Yohei Nishimura’s fired books are moving far beyond their fragile beauty. Whilst the link with the autodafé appears obvious, what really takes places is a conservation or even a revelation, not a destruction. Admittedly the ink gradually disappears during the ten long hours of firing, but it is a work of collective memory to which the artist invites us with, as the starting point, the first page intact suspended above each work. Founded in 1948 by Yagi Kazuo, the SÅdeisha movement contributed to the development of the ceramic-object concept (obuje-yaki) in opposition to utility pottery (yakimono). Through this ambiguous term, the avant-garde sought to break with sculpture in order to maintain this tension in the field of ceramic. But the irony is that it has thus contributed to the very western dichotomy between ceramic and art (modern, then contemporary). Whilst Yagi Kazuo launched the movement with his kokuto black ceramics fired at a low temperature, Ryoji Koie was even more radical, sometimes using industrial wood reduced into powder to mould his face, sometimes reducing the concept of ceramic to its simplest expression: “to burn thingsâ€, the literal translation of the word yakimono, going as far as simply making a mark with a cutting torch on the ground. Very often categorised as a ceramist, Yohei Nishimura began by studying sculpture and this is undoubtedly a key element in his freedom. When he creates a kokuto piece in ceramic, in this particular case a recipient, it is an object in which to keep magazines that have been fired in the kiln. When he “burns thingsâ€, for instance books or fruit, it is to better conserve them. Transcending the constraints confronting the SÅdeisha members, his work often takes the form of an installation, sometimes involving very different materials and techniques, such as iron, wood, lead or everyday objects. For his most recent work, on a series of books to be thrown out, he has only kept the covers. Painted in a way that only leaves visible the red cross showing that they were intended for the bin, they are carefully framed and covered with a protective layer of bees’ wax. In the era of the cloud, ebooks and other digital tablets, this pioneer in specialised teaching for the visually impaired replaces substance and imagination with virtual and thus calls on our common, universal memory. Copyright: the two last pictures come from his book edited by the Aichi Prefecture Museum.
  11. Japan

    I am trying to plan a trip to Japan, and I want to know what the best regions to visit for ceramics? I want to try and do some studio vists and meet some Japanese potters and see traditional Japanese potters. If any one can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Joe
  12. From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Yunomi thrown from clay with massive amounts of local NH granite dust and stone mixed in. Almost more stone than clay. Fired many multiple times in my woodfired noborigama to get the rocks to melt sufficiently. Included wooden stoage box. Sold at one of my solo exhibitions at an asian art gallery in the US. Now in the personal collection of the executive director of a US art museum.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  13. Youhen Bottle Form

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. In my personal collection.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  14. Youhen Vase Form

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  15. Youhen Flower Arranging Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  16. Youhen Flower Arranging Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  17. From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  18. Yakishime Gourd Shape Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; anagama woodfired at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts; Orton cone 13-14. In my personal collection.

    © John Baymore 2011 - all rights reserved

  19. Yakishime Gourd Shape Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; anagama woodfired at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts; Orton cone 13-14. In my personal collection.

    © John Baymore 2011 - all rights reserved

  20. Oribe Glaze Gourd Shape Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; noborigama woodfired; Orton cone 10; granite bearing claybody; oribe style glaze. In the Tokyo National University of the Arts collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2011 - all rights reserved

  21. Granite Glazed Vase

    From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; noborigama woodfired; Orton cone 12; granite, ash, and local clay glaze. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2011 - all rights reserved

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