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Found 201 results

  1. Hi everyone, I did try and find a solution but only came up with how to change the glaze composition. I have two urn which I just fired and both have crazing. I checked thick6of the glaze and all seemed fine. It's stoneware fired to 1200°C with 20 min hold. I've had problems making these pieces and it's taken me 8 months due to health issues and trying different forms for the request. Can I refire and hope that the glaze will smooth out or touch up with glaze and refire? Solutions would be much appreciated. Many thanks Andrea
  2. Hi, I am trying to glaze some logo mugs (mugs with logo plaques/medallions that have company logos/words on them) and want to get some advice on the best way to make the words/shapes on the plaques show up. I am wondering if I should use a combination of iron oxide and a clear glaze to accent the words/shapes in black iron oxide and the clear glaze on the rest of the medallion/plaque? The rest of the mug will be dipped in another glaze. I am using speckled brownstone clay, cone 6 glaze firing, and glazes made in-house. Thank you for your advice!
  3. When I was taking ceramic classes my teacher used some tool to rub on the sharp glaze edges that would rub the broken bubbles down so you did not get hurt. I seem to keep thinking it was made from cement. Anyone know what this is or if this is what it is?
  4. hello i'm sima from iran and i am a beginner i really want to learn about the techniques that are used to make these products. hope you could help me learn more. if you know any resources leet me know
  5. Hi folks, Today I was working on the Wedding Jar that I had made for a nephew, and was trying to accent their lettering for names and dates. I had stamped these in, but it was not quite clear so I cleaned them up and added a stain over top thinking to do a little mishima to bring the letters up. However, due to the curved surface I lost some of the letter forms. What to do. I used a small brush after engraving the missing areas to flow the glaze in, and that worked. At the same time I decided to use the brush with a white engobe to accent the flowers of the mountain laurel I had stamped into the form. My tip for the day though is much simpler. I had problems with getting the right amount of slip or stain on to the fine bristled brush. I tried a lot of different techniques and then tried to dip a sponge brush into the container of slip or stain and lay it over the top of the container loading the brush up from that. It worked perfectly with just the right amount of stain or slip to work into the brush and keep the fine work when painting on the pot. I was an art teacher, working with a lot of media, especially watercolor, acrylic, and inks. This technique I had never heard of, but it would work well with almost any media to keep from overloading a brush. So. . .. do any of you have some technique that would work well with the use of stains, underglazes, glazes, even if brushing, spraying, or other technique? Post it here, it would be great to hear from you. best, Pres
  6. I have this heavy blisters and pinholes issue and I m doing the Bisque at cone 08 and glaze temperature is at cone 6 + 40 mins soak., Whats the reason behind this blisters and pinholes ? Is it a clay issue or its something to do with a glaze chemistry ?
  7. BornonSunsetCeramics

    Reglaze tips needed!

    Just a quick question about re-firing work. I wasn't happy with some details around a logo that I carved in to my pieces so I've fixed them with glaze (and also filled a few pinholes) - my question is whether or not I need to be as meticulous about dust and fingerprints on these like you do with glaze on bisque. I had to hold them firmly and work slowly to fix my glaze errors from the past firing. I'm feeling like that stuff (oil from my hands, dust) will burn off before the glaze melts again since its technically laying over top of a hardened/fired glaze and not absorbing into un-fired glaze... thoughts? Thanks so much, friends!
  8. Malinda

    Glaze Defect

    This is once-fired glaze @ 900 Celsius. How I eliminate that defect???
  9. Sheryl Leigh

    Celadon - Application?

    Hi all! First off, my apologies if this is in the wrong section. I'm new to Celadons (are all transparent glazes Celadon?). I have yet to have a piece where the celadon is a uniform consistency, even on the flat areas (I'm aware that it should be darker for contrast in carving, etc.). Either drips show up or there is a slight unevenness. Is this just something you have to deal with in using these glazes or am I missing something in application? Some of the glazes I'm using are bought, one (Ms. Selsor's faux celadon )was mixed by me. Any help is appreciated!
  10. Hi everyone, A question. Can anyone see a problem with not glazing over underglaze for non food works? I have looked but can't find an answer anywhere and it seems that everyone uses a glaze over the top for the underglazes. I'm using porcelain clay to make wearable works including rings (I should add). I love the results, and the undergalzes adhere very well to the porcelain. I can even wet sand after the final fire and the design stays put. The colours appear somewhat softer but that is good too. I belive that the newer underglazes have more frit in them making them a litle more like a glaze themselves and this is why they work differntly to older style glazes.? Any issues? I can do it but is it a bad idea as far as safely goes? cheers Lilly aka etched
  11. I'm going to have pots in a once/year wood firing. Ben Bates Oribe Green Cone 9-13 was given in a CM this past year and looks very interesting but I am wondering with 6% Copper carbonate if it would be food safe fired between cone 10 - 12? recipe is: Bone ash 2% Talc 9% Whiting 23% Custer feldspar 31% EPK 11% Silica 24% add: Copper Carb 6% Thanks for any help you can offer.
  12. Hello! New to the site and am curious about the effects of dry wood ash on glazes. I have found a lot of info about wood ash glazes, but not so much about applying dry wood ash onto an already applied and dried (or sometimes sprayed with a little water) glaze. I realize glaze recipes will vary greatly so it may not be very helpful to name any, but I have had great results (in my opinion) with the shino glaze at the pottery school I attend, please see the attached image. I have also tried this on our versions of tenmoku and iron red with results of some fluxing and gold speckling, respectively. So I suppose my question is what is it in shino glaze that reacts that way with the "freckling", for the lack of a more accurate term? (Perhaps this is carbon trapping? I do experiment with a CTC shino as well.) I'd like to experiment with other glazes and colors, but am curious to know if there is a specific ingredient (or more than one) that I should look for to possibly gauge what the results may be with applied dry wood ash. Has anyone tried this on, say, a standard celadon or spodumene glaze, if there are such things? Yes, I am about to do some test tiles, but this will take weeks for results (I am a student so at the mercy of their schedule) so any insight would be greatly appreciated as I could completely avoid any glazes that would have undesirable effect. Thank you so much. Stephen
  13. Hi, I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts on this effect: website is here: http://www.mostra-moustiers.com/fr/galerie-la-mostra/aire-goutt-allikmets.php Is this a look achieved through a glaze that cracks/crazes excessively, or what else is happening here?! I've seen a few vessels with this type of effect recently and I think it looks great, but how exactly is it done?!
  14. Hi, does anyone have any advice on how to ensure a glaze is food safe and doesn't leach anything harmful? I know that it's possible to send samples off to get tested, but for a hobby potter this is not too useful since even if I know that one batch is OK, I can't adequately ensure that I'll meet exactly the same conditions for a subsequent batch and I can't keep sending stuff off for testing, it would get too expensive. So far I've just avoided the problem by only making ornamental ware, but it would be quite nice to make a few mugs that could be used at home. Are there any glazes that simply don't have anything harmful in them, so that even if they leach they are not going to make anyone ill?!
  15. Hello everyone! I am stumped on this issue and was wondering if anyone had any insight or advice on this. We opened our soda kiln a couple weeks ago and I had a problem with my work. I fired 64 pcs, most of which was Rods Bod clay body which also had some Red Iron Oxide slip decoration on it. I used Penn State Shino that I mixed the day that I glazed. 60% of it had major shivering! The glaze was just crumbling off and some thicker areas coming off in large pieces, leaving a grey stony finish behind. Such a bummer! See video here: https://youtu.be/0cbd0eXvYII Some things to note in this firing: - No one else's work shivered, but no one else used Rods bod or PSS Shino. - Pieces from previous firing that didn't make it in kiln and fired this time were ALL okay. They had been sitting for 6 wks and were Rods Bod with RIO decoration and PSS glaze. - I fired over two dozen spoons with Takamori clay body and PSS glaze, and NONE of them shivered. There was some crazing. - All my Rods Bod pcs with SF Shino or other glazes did not shiver. - 5 sake cups that fired cold didn't shiver. - There was crazing on several pieces. - Areas that got hit with a lot of soda on Rods Bod/PSS would shiver. - I did rush the drying process of Rods bod, drying in the sun and did a 2 hour pre-heat when I bisqued. I never had a shivering problem with Rods Bod and PSS glaze until the last two firings, which make me wonder if it's a clay body issue, a combo of clay body and glaze fit, or something happened in the glaze mixture. Or could it be the soda ash? I did find a discrepancy in our PSS recipe vs. the one from Liz Willoughby when I double checked today; we use 4.9 OM4 amount instead of her 14.9 OM4 amt, and I wonder if that makes a difference in anything. SODA ASH SPRAY RECIPE 1 lb soda ash to 1/2 gal water PENN STATE SHINO RECIPE - LIZ WILLOUGHBY 14.6 Neph Synite 7.8 Soda ash (light) 9.7 EPK 4.9 OM4 34.0 F4 feldspar 29.0 Spodumene
  16. I am scheduled to take my very first pottery class next week and I have no experience in ceramics. My short term goal is to make one pot that I will use at home in my oven for cooking purposes. When i was growing up back in Greece, I remember my mom using such a pot and I want to make one just like it. Is there a special glaze and/or process that I need to use for this? I presume that after the baking the clay pot is porous and cannot be used without some sort of an additional step that will seal it. Any ideas?
  17. So, I've been working on two slab projects for the last 2 weeks. Both of them have some pieces in the 3rd dimension as well as lots of 2D detail. I finished constructing both pieces today and despite how shaky my hands were, managed to paint both almost immaculately. Thing is, I forgot to give them a bisque firing before I jumped into glazing them. They're so detailed that there's no way I can remove the glaze without destroying the work in the process, so unless there's another way to make finished work out of them, they're garbage and I wasted my time, materials, and effort. My instructor must have felt really bad for me, because as I was sticking the pieces back on the rack and deciding whether or not to trash them she came over and decided my stuff was special enough that we were going to try a risky operation, putting both pieces through both bisque firing and final firing despite them being glazed out of order. She says that the color won't be as consistent and you couldn't eat off of them (fine by me, because they're not dishes), but they should still stick together and come out okay. Before we try this, however, I wanted to take some initiative and research both the risks of this test and any alternatives. Despite my excellent googling skills, I haven't been able to find an article or forum topic specific enough to my situation, so I figured I'd start one myself. Any and all information you can give me will be useful. I just want to know what might happen if we try to fire this thing and/or if there are any other ways to save the work with less risk involved.
  18. Hey gang! I'm curious if there is a way to achieve the look of MG2 over soldate 60 - that cool speckled look, at cone 6 in an electric kiln? I love the look and miss making it, and would love to recreate it at home if possible. Thanks!!
  19. Jeremy Ayers

    c6 glaze too soft

    I have this lovely off white glaze c6 that I've been using for awhile but its too soft. It will mar slightly with a knife. I'm not very strong in glaze calc - I"ve messed around with some other fluxes but haven't gotten any results for a better melt. I fire to c6 via the programmed firing with a half hour controlled cool down to 2130 on my Skutt kiln. I would love any advice on getting a better melt with this glaze without effecting the color and finish too much. OFF WHITE Neph Sy 59 Dolemite 19.5 Zircopax 14.7 OM4 Ball 2.4 RIO .9 G Borate 10 Bent 2
  20. Fellow potters, I need your expertise: I'm part of a potter's guild and we're in the process of moving everything to a new space - our kilns, our chemicals, our tools, and our already-mixed glazes. Most of it is pretty easy (in theory) but I am hoping some of you might have some insight on moving glaze buckets - or at least making them a little lighter and hopefully easier to move. Does anyone have any tips or tricks to getting the water out of a glaze, relatively quickly, without compromising the integrity of the mixture? Just pouring out the top layer of water seems like it might also take out any material that is lighter than the rest and stays suspended in the water. Is there a filtering device for this purpose? Hopefully we'll be moving or donating most of the glazes, but some will probably be disposed of - if anyone has any insight on best practices that would be much appreciated also. Any/all other tips for doing a big studio move (on a tight budget) would be more than welcome!
  21. Dear everyone, I am quite new to a slip casting technique. Have made several plaster molds for casting porcelain. And had some success, but recently I have noticed that some of the greenware gets tiny pinholes and then, (because some cups doesnt have it) there are SOMETIMES also pinholes on the glaze. If i got it right, those tiny pinholes are the result of air bubbles or pieces of dust in the casting slip, right? But i wonder, do those pinholes influence the glaze? I am a bit confused, because some of the porcelain cups are not having those pinholes on the glaze and some do have. The thing is that the kiln in the studio where i used to fire my work is very old, and as a kiln technician said, it fires hire than it should and moreover fires unevenly. I wonder if this could be the reason for the pinholes on the glaze surface? Or maybe pinholes on the greenware? Or both? Do you have any ideas? Or similar experience? Thank you in advance!!
  22. Hello, I have been making terracotta tiles & glazing them in the Majolica style. The tiles were bisque fired to 950 and the 3 coats of white glaze applied to tiles with decoration painted on the surface. The white glaze was a white glossy glaze not a Tin Glaze. Pin holing was apparent on surface of glaze before firing and remained after firing to 1080. Anybody got any advice please ?
  23. Hello all! I was researching opacifiers today and came across the page for Titanium Dioxide on Digitalfire.com (https://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/titanium_dioxide_1644.html). It says that you can spray it over a glaze to achieve variegated effects, like a crystalline tea-dust look. I was wondering if anyone here has had experience with this and could give me some tips for dry material to water ratio, or any other knowledge that may come in handy. I have never sprayed any glazes before. Thanks much!
  24. Hi All, I wonder if anyone can identify this mug please? More importantly can anyone tell me what glaze this is? where to buy some more or less the same? what temp to fire at to get this look? or if not how to achieve this look. It has a real silky feel, sort of a matt satin glaze I think. Any info would be good. Thank you in advance.
  25. Hi, I am wanting to get a glaze like the image shown on this mug. Anyone know what it is and how to get it please? The middle part I assume is oxide? and the blue / pale white rings, maybe another glaze? thank you, any advice appreciated. Don
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