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  1. I have concluded my studies on stoneware and porcelain: time to move on to a new topic. I have been reading some background studies done in the 40s, thru 70,s. on slip chemistry. I am interested in hearing experiences, thoughts, opinions, links to articles, abstracts, etc. This is an open topic, so as long as your post has the word "clay" in it: ramble on. Finite details welcomed. I have been reading studies from W.G. Lawrence and A.F. Norton; both Alfred PhD's on this topic. While viscosity was covered, there was much more emphasis placed on the water film, PH levels, temperature, and particle stacking. It was specifically noted that "particle stacking" is an entirely different principle than particle distribution. Was or is any of these principles taught, or still covered today? Any potter familiar with "terra sig" has delved into PH and particle stacking. Does anyone have links about the effects of temperature on ionic charges? Tom i realize there are many links to collidal chemistry, PH dependent charges, etc: but interested in those specifically related to pottery use.
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