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Found 163 results

  1. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    The outside of the pie plate I decorated with a pattern of leaves in white slip. The bottom I glazed clear to show the contrast between the white slip and the Moroccan Sand underneath; the outside of the pie plate I glazed in Deep Sienna Speckle, which reminds me of pumpkin pie.

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  2. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  3. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Pie plate slip cast in white stoneware from Laguna. I painted three coats of Moroccan Sand slip on the inside and bottom of the plate. I carved an intricate design of leaves and vines around the bride and groom's initials and wedding date to show the white clay underneath the taupe clay. This was glazed in clear.

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  4. Hi guys, I have some pieces I want to cast in plaster for a mould. The pieces will not be particularly flexible and I worry they wont release properly. Its a basic vase shape that narrows in at the top like a pair- this taper part is a 6cm diameter x 8cm long pipe that I feel the plaster will grip too tightly to release and slip out. I haven't had much luck with soft soap and I'm wondering could I rub a candle on my piece to give it a shiny and slightly slippery surface for the plaster to cast? I worry it will ruin the porosity of the mould though. Has anyone done such a thing? Other solutions are welcome but I'm mostly wondering if wax will ruin plaster or there are similar products that wont. Cheers!
  5. I have been trying to find an answer to this online with no result. If I were to mix two kinds of premixed casting slip with different shrinkage rates, what would happen? Would the shrinkage average out or would a mushroom cloud obliterate my dad's kiln shed? We want to try mixing Laguna Oriental Pearl (shrinkage 14%) with Lagina White Stoneware (shrinkage 10%). I know that stoneware/porcelain blends exist as a clay form, but I'm not sure how it works with slip.
  6. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Wicked Witch Is Dead This project was created as part of the Ceramic Arts Community forum: Community Challenge #2. The tornado implies form is the actual container intended for a plant. The entire work was thrown in three parts: the base/bowl, an angle tube/pipe, and the larger container. The small building and leg appendages were hand formed and attached prior to bisque firing. Finished height of the glazed piece is approximately 17".
  7. I use nichrome wire hooks to hang decorations no larger than half the size of the palm of your hand and no thicker than 5mm, though often a lot smaller and a lot thinner. I've been using hooks as the decorations are fairly heavy and so I use thick bead rods - too thick to thread directly through the holes made in the clay. (If anybody could suggest a better method I'm open to making my life easier, bending 100 pieces of wire and hanging takes a lifetime!) The wire itself is sturdy and doesn't slump, however I use a white stoneware body, decorated and transparently glazed. After a stoneware glaze firing (I glaze to 1250) I have what I can only describe as green burn marks above the area where I've cut the hole, right where the wire sits, though the wire does not touch the piece. I thought it might be the wire getting old, it can become quite black and brittle after several firings. However after replacing it with new wire I have the same problem on the first firing. I can't remember it being a problem I've always had, and I've tried several different clays recently in a sampling run - it's happened with all of them, so just trying to rule things out. It's ruining what would otherwise be completely saleable work and I'm totally confused! I really hope I'm missing something obvious here; can anybody shed some light please!?
  8. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  9. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Fujita scale is a measure of a tornado's intensity based upon the amount of destruction it causes...or how much it eats. Having experienced the destruction, first hand, of an F2 glancing off my home, it wasn't difficult to put a face on the monster that caused destruction in my neighborhood. Only now, new things grow from where the damage occured...thus a container for a plant with the form of the dark cloud of demolition impressed into the side.

    © Copyright 2015 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All Rights Reserved.

  10. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    Wheel-thrown bowl with undulating edge, depicting Choctaw ponies running free in the Oklahoma mountains.

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  11. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    Lidded jar depicting Choctaw woman collecting bark for medicine tea.

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  12. LeeU

    Spoon Rest

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Spoon rest-Morgan body
  13. LeeU

    Bowl

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Laguna's Dark Ultramarine on white w/sand, altered rim
  14. LeeU

    Small Tray

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Gray Vashon body and Laguna's Alfred Blue
  15. LeeU

    Small Bowl

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Laguna White w/Sand and Coyote clear
  16. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    For those who have been following along with the drama of making "F3 - The Wizard of Oz" tornado container, this second version survived the bisque firing and awaits detailing with underglaze and glazing...hopefully, a single glaze firing and perhaps a single decal firing. Read more about this project and projects by other artists in the Ceramic Arts Community Forum - "Community Challenge #2".
  17. From the album: Work in Progress

    Playing around with different slip designs for my favorite from my set of vintage dinnerware.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade, all rights reserved

  18. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    I understand that tornadoes are measured on the Fujita Scale (not to be confused with a Fajita's impact on my scales) and ranked by the intensity of the destruction to human-built structures and vegetation...basically, 'how much the tornado Eats". This information is the inspiration for "EF-3 The Eater", a planter with facial features, including a tongue that has snatched a small structure like a lizard might catch a bug. And yes, this one is a little creepy...even for me This container (greenware) stands 19" tall and is contructed of three separate, wheel-thrown pieces. The upper-most piece has been altered and has hand-built pieces added.

    © Copyright 2015 Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All rights reserved.

  19. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    The holder on the left was done all in white clay and slip. The mountain design was washed with iron oxide and received only one coat of the glaze I used on the rest of the piece. The holder on the right has mountains painted on in a Hawaiian Red slip, and otherwise received the same glaze and treatment. I like them both. I was hoping to find an alternative to the iron oxide wash, which can be a mess.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015, all rights reserved

  20. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    This was my first attempt at "production" (making three of the same size and shape). There is some variation but they turned out clearly a matching set! I was quite pleased. The inside was painted with a creamy yellow engobe before bisque firing, and the outside was decorated with the same engobe and coated with clear before the final firing. I wanted to see if the engobe would end up different colors but it didn't change a bit.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015, all rights reserved

  21. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    Version Two (EF-2) of the Tornado Planter has just started a long drying phase. With the help of Photoshop, I shaded out the messy studio so the planter is a little lot easier to see. This one is about 4" taller than the previous effort and the legs of the Wicked Witch are a little larger as well. The container is three wheel-thrown pieces assembled together with the addition of the 2 hand-built legs and 7 building parts. The entire work is stoneware and roughly 21" tall at the greenware stage.

    © Copyright 2015 by Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  22. Hi all, this forum has been a treasure trove of information while I was learning and exploring techniques, I hope you can help me with a specific question. I like the look of unglazed clay when it has been fired at ^10. Red clays, black clays, off white clays… I like to play with the contrast of glazed and unglazed fired clay. One thing I would like to try, is to give color to the unglazed areas of my work, sort of like the pitcher pic I attached below. This is not exactly what I'm going for, though, but close. Here I assume the pattern on the unglazed clay is iron oxide applied along with the glaze and high-fired at the same time. Perhaps the tumblers I attached are like a better example of what I'm talking about, you can see she dipped the rim in white glaze and painted the rest with bright stripes, I'm puzzled as to how/what steps/what with. What I'd like to do is work in two steps. First I'd glaze the pot & fire it, and then I'd apply vivid colors to the unglazed parts, leaving the glazed part alone, and fire the ware again, at a lower temperature (lower^ is how I understand I will get the brightest colors). So my question is : What kind of color (overglaze/underglaze/stains..) would a) adhere to mature unglazed stoneware, and become permanent during firing ? This is not for the interior of dinnerware, but possibly destined to items that would get handled a lot. I guess another question would be : Am I approaching this wrong and should I consider another process? Thank you for any insight you may have on this, D. The photos are of work by Ako Castuera and Shino Takeda
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