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Found 164 results

  1. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are my prototypes for a new direction in hand-building...at least mostly hand-building. I have never been completely satisfied with the resulting rims on hand-built mugs, so I have incorporated wheel-thrown rims that feel so much better on the lips. The k-cup in the image is simply to add something appropriate for scale...and wouldn't be part of a sale *grin*. All of these are 12-14 oz. mugs and the style and production technique are very similar to the work of Sandra Blain (Thanks, Sandy!).

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All rights reserved.

  2. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a large, 3.5+ quart, mixing bowl that is part of a commission project for a retiring university dean. You might guess that the dean had something to do with the music program...and that would be correct. The bowl stands 7" tall and is a full 12" wide at the rim. The black keys were added individually to the wheel thrown piece and later brushed with Amaco Velvet underglaze. The exterior is glazed with Woo's Blue. The interior is Pete's Cranberry. A final light coat of clear was sprayed over the underglazes section for additional sheen. This is a Cone 10 reduction piece.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  3. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are the final mugs of the commissioned work for the dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  4. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  5. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 12oz-14oz. stoneware mug with a piano/keyboard theme. The rim is wheel thrown and re-assembled into a hand-built, slab-constructed base that has been stamped and stretched/altered. Handle is pulled and attached after the rim is in-place and black keys have been cut from a slab and attached/scored & slipped. Interior and rim is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior parts are brushed-on Amaco Velvet underglaze sprayed with a couple of light coats of clear. Mug is fired to Cone 10 reduction.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  6. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  7. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  8. I've bought about a dozen different Terracolor glazes, which are supposed to have "built in effects", looking very much like Raku... Two of the more solid color glazes look and work as they do on their product images, and one of the effect glazes also works beautifully and looks exactly like their product image. However, all others I've tried are complete disasters compared to the product images, and I've tried to vary water content, bisque firing temps, application thickness, firing temps... the lot! I don't want general tips, because even Terracolor themselves can't give me good pointers as to what I'm doing wrong. My question is this: Has anyone here used Terracolor, and what are your experiences?
  9. From the album: Pottery 2016

    Wheel thrown in buff stoneware with speckles. Carved with wildflowers and grass. Underglazed with Duncan Concepts Bright Kiwi. Interior glazed with Laguna Dynasty Red or Peach Blush. Flowers in Peach Blush, Dynasty Red, and Blackberry Wine. Exterior aside from flowers left raw, although I dipped the first couple inches of the top and the handle in Laguna Clear Bright. Nicer to touch and put your mouth against.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  10. From the album: Pottery 2016

    Wheel thrown in buff stoneware with speckles. Carved with wildflowers and grass. Underglazed with Duncan Concepts Bright Kiwi. Interior glazed with Laguna Peach Blush. Flowers in Peach Blush, Dynasty Red, and Blackberry Wine. Exterior aside from flowers left raw.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  11. From the album: Pottery 2016

    White stoneware, thrown on the wheel as a "chopstick" jar and then altered into a teapot. I added the little hand-shaped flower knob. Fired at ^6 in an electric kiln. Laguna's Dynasty Red and Peach Blush, Duncan Concepts Bright Kiwi as the underglazed leaves and stems. There are some issues with it as a teapot. It's a bit thicker and more bottom heavy than I'd like. It's also smaller than I intended, only holds 16 oz. However, there are a lot of things I did right. The lid fits really nicely. The handle is comfortable for fitting all your fingers in and pouring even with the teapot full. The spout works (a couple of tiny drips but not bad at all) and the strainer works too. I tried it. So I would say this was a very useful learning experience. And I am far from unhappy with my very first teapot!

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  12. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is strictly a whimsical demo experiment of taking a wheel-thrown vessel and doing several treatments on it. This one has been pinched, paddled, appended stamped, textured and converted to a pouring pot. The 'pun' is a little more sublet (for some at least).

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  13. From the album: Ocarinas, Flutes, & Aerophones

    Fully functional ocarina/flue that plays one octave. Handbuilt stoneware, approximately 12" tall, with red iron oxide stain, Amoco Velvet underglaze, and clear glaze fired to cone 10 reduction.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  14. From the album: Ocarinas, Flutes, & Aerophones

    These three instruments represent the experimentation with building, glazing, and firing ocarinas (flutes) over the period of 2013, 2014, and 2015. The shadowbox idea is the direction I plan to take for displays, although the lighting may need some help by a minor adjustment in the box depth. Friends here on the CAC Forum might recognize the "Witch is Dead" themed piece in the middle as a spin-off of a Community Challenge project.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  15. Dears I recently made tea pots based on the old japanese houhin design. Hence it does not need a metal seeve. However, after using them some dark spots appear on the bottom side. Perhaps this is just the color of the tea slowly leaking through. I wonder if it could be an unhealthy fungus. It was fired approx 1250 degrees. For comparision, the inverted teapot on the top right of the photo does not have dark spots. Because it is glazed on the inside as well. Any experience or ideas on that? Thanks. kind regards Zustand
  16. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    Upper parts of the hydria are starting to come together. The container is just over 18" tall at this stage and was wheel thrown in two parts, assembled on the wheel, allowed to dry for a few hours and then given the final shaping/neck-forming. With the addition of the footed-base, the greenware will stand just under 24" tall...that cannon happen until the base is hardened sufficiently to hold the weight of the upper portions.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN - All rights reserved.

  17. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    Realizing that the greenware portions of the container will all of the assembled parts will weight 12-14 pounds, I changed the plans for the base to be more than just stocky feet. This will dry slowly over night since the wheel thrown pieces and the hand built feet are at different degrees of dryness. All together, the bas will have to be quite dry before assembling the top to the base.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  18. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    The horns on this project are the side handles for a hydro-like container. If pulled like one might make a handle for a mug, the large end of the pull would be nearly 2" in diameter...and there are weight and drying issues that make that a poor option. In this instance, the horns started as a 1.5 pound lump of clay pulled over a wooden tool that is sold/marketed as a spout maker. Once the basic form/thickness is established on the spout maker, there is a small amount of traditional pulling involved before forming the twist on the horn.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  19. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    Side view of the completed assembly.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  20. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    Front view of the complete assembly. Detailing steps to follow.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  21. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    Close-up of the ram's head hydra with all parts assembled. At this stage the piece will be allowed to rest until leather hard, then additional details will be carved, scraped, textured, etc.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  22. From the album: Sketches by Paul

    This is the first of the two ram horn handles attached to the hydria project. From the original sketch, the ram's head and horns were to scale as an attachment for the hydra...now, it is starting to feel a little more like a ram's head with a hydra attached. All to say, sometimes you just roll with it and see how things turn out. Some minor alteration of the belly of this pot has been done (i.e. the round form has been elongated slightly)...I'll sleep on this change before making additional alterations. The forming of the ridges on the horn does take a bit of time...probably an hour and a half, plus 2 cups of coffee . -Paul

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  23. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    Moroccan Sand clay from Laguna with carved modern leaves. I applied white stoneware slip inlay and glazed the interior in their Navy Blue.

    © Copyright Giselle No. 5 Ceramics (Giselle Massey) 2015, all rights reserved

  24. From the album: Glaze Combinations

    Mug for a local apple merchant. The body glaze is Coyote Red/Gold with a small accent of Gun Metal Green on the rim. Best results are achieved by leaving the upper 1/4-1/2" unglazed and then dipping into the green. The apple embellishment is hand-painted: Mayco Caramel (Cone 05) - Coyote Really Red and whatever green I'm in the mood for! Clay is Laguna BMix5

    © Whistle Tree Pottery - Ellijay, GA 2015

  25. GA_Clayman67

    Bowl

    From the album: Glaze Combinations

    Cone 6 firing - base glaze is Amaco Ancient Jasper with 3 coats of Coyote Red/Gold on the exterior and interior rims. Clay is Laguna BMix5

    © Whistle Tree Pottery - Ellijay, GA 2015

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