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Found 178 results

  1. Note: This post discusses an Australian cone 10 body few will know anything about - I hope it will still be possible to discuss generalisations and brainstorm causes! Ok, my local pottery use a fine, white, 120mesh, high-fire cone 10 porcelaneous stoneware clay (Walker Ceramics PB103), this has been the primary throwing clay for at least the last decade. This year, almost every glaze firing has produced ware with some kind of surface debris of a tiny (1mm) to small (8mm) size. The debris appears on the unglazed pots, as well as scattered below every glaze, but it doesn't break the glaze surface. When you see the debris on the unglazed part of the pot, amidst the off-white clay body, the debris is bright white in colour, and looks for all the world as if you could flick it off with your nail. Sometimes the problem looks like a round pimple, other times it is completely irregular in shape. The pieces are mostly utilitarian ware, bowls, cups, plates, some decorative and sculptural. Regardless of whether the surface has been untouched from wet/trimmed at leather hard/or sanded/sponged from bone dry, the debris appears. The biscuit firing shows no issues, but almost every glaze fired piece shows symptoms (but not *always*!) After the first instance of this problem, the recycled clay anyone was using was dumped. Yet firings from the new bagged clay showed the same issue. (We were monitoring the clay being used carefully, as we were all working toward producing ware for a fundraiser.) We are quite perplexed. The group are mostly old school potters, I mention this because the internal discussion about our problem has no consensus. While there are a lot of folk with knowledge of the body, the kilns, and the process, no can agree whether the body is at fault, or something else. I am young, technically-minded, and have OCD - I want to understand and know why! While I know my clays, I know less about their kilns and firing. Is is the body? Is it dirty shelves? Is something inside the kiln deteriorating? Is it organics not burning out? We wondered about over-firing, but we did a few firings where the cone 9 did not go flat, so over-firing seems unlikely. The pottery is communal, different glazes are used, sometimes no glaze, and still the debris. We work exclusively with high-fire stoneware or porcelain. No low or mid-fire bodies are allowed inside the studio, or their electric kilns. No personal glazes, no experimentation, they risk nothing. I know little about the firing specifics, but apparently no firing programme changes have been made. I know they fire at a rise of 150°C per hour, top fire to 1280°C. I know this post is all over the place and a bit rambling, and I apologise. I just want to know if anyone has seen or heard of anything like this before? (I have enquired with the manufacturer, and am taking my dSLR to get detailed shots of the problem to send to them, when I have them I will post the images here.) Many thanks.
  2. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    The outside of the pie plate I decorated with a pattern of leaves in white slip. The bottom I glazed clear to show the contrast between the white slip and the Moroccan Sand underneath; the outside of the pie plate I glazed in Deep Sienna Speckle, which reminds me of pumpkin pie.

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  3. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  4. From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Pie plate slip cast in white stoneware from Laguna. I painted three coats of Moroccan Sand slip on the inside and bottom of the plate. I carved an intricate design of leaves and vines around the bride and groom's initials and wedding date to show the white clay underneath the taupe clay. This was glazed in clear.

    © Copyright 2015 Giselle Massey, all rights reserved

  5. Hi guys, I have some pieces I want to cast in plaster for a mould. The pieces will not be particularly flexible and I worry they wont release properly. Its a basic vase shape that narrows in at the top like a pair- this taper part is a 6cm diameter x 8cm long pipe that I feel the plaster will grip too tightly to release and slip out. I haven't had much luck with soft soap and I'm wondering could I rub a candle on my piece to give it a shiny and slightly slippery surface for the plaster to cast? I worry it will ruin the porosity of the mould though. Has anyone done such a thing? Other solutions are welcome but I'm mostly wondering if wax will ruin plaster or there are similar products that wont. Cheers!
  6. I have been trying to find an answer to this online with no result. If I were to mix two kinds of premixed casting slip with different shrinkage rates, what would happen? Would the shrinkage average out or would a mushroom cloud obliterate my dad's kiln shed? We want to try mixing Laguna Oriental Pearl (shrinkage 14%) with Lagina White Stoneware (shrinkage 10%). I know that stoneware/porcelain blends exist as a clay form, but I'm not sure how it works with slip.
  7. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Wicked Witch Is Dead This project was created as part of the Ceramic Arts Community forum: Community Challenge #2. The tornado implies form is the actual container intended for a plant. The entire work was thrown in three parts: the base/bowl, an angle tube/pipe, and the larger container. The small building and leg appendages were hand formed and attached prior to bisque firing. Finished height of the glazed piece is approximately 17".
  8. I use nichrome wire hooks to hang decorations no larger than half the size of the palm of your hand and no thicker than 5mm, though often a lot smaller and a lot thinner. I've been using hooks as the decorations are fairly heavy and so I use thick bead rods - too thick to thread directly through the holes made in the clay. (If anybody could suggest a better method I'm open to making my life easier, bending 100 pieces of wire and hanging takes a lifetime!) The wire itself is sturdy and doesn't slump, however I use a white stoneware body, decorated and transparently glazed. After a stoneware glaze firing (I glaze to 1250) I have what I can only describe as green burn marks above the area where I've cut the hole, right where the wire sits, though the wire does not touch the piece. I thought it might be the wire getting old, it can become quite black and brittle after several firings. However after replacing it with new wire I have the same problem on the first firing. I can't remember it being a problem I've always had, and I've tried several different clays recently in a sampling run - it's happened with all of them, so just trying to rule things out. It's ruining what would otherwise be completely saleable work and I'm totally confused! I really hope I'm missing something obvious here; can anybody shed some light please!?
  9. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  10. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Fujita scale is a measure of a tornado's intensity based upon the amount of destruction it causes...or how much it eats. Having experienced the destruction, first hand, of an F2 glancing off my home, it wasn't difficult to put a face on the monster that caused destruction in my neighborhood. Only now, new things grow from where the damage occured...thus a container for a plant with the form of the dark cloud of demolition impressed into the side.

    © Copyright 2015 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All Rights Reserved.

  11. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    Wheel-thrown bowl with undulating edge, depicting Choctaw ponies running free in the Oklahoma mountains.

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  12. From the album: 2015 Sgraffito

    Lidded jar depicting Choctaw woman collecting bark for medicine tea.

    © 2015, Carolyn Bernard Young

  13. LeeU

    Spoon Rest

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Spoon rest-Morgan body
  14. LeeU

    Spoon Rest

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Spoon rest-clear on white body
  15. LeeU

    Incense Holders

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    The stick burner is white body, clear glaze
  16. From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Duncan's Renaissance Henna; Spectrum Pewter on incised area (looks much more dark/silver in natural light)
  17. LeeU

    Bowl

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Laguna's Dark Ultramarine on white w/sand, altered rim
  18. LeeU

    Small Tray

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Gray Vashon body and Laguna's Alfred Blue
  19. From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Mid-dark body with clear in the cavity, embellished with bead
  20. LeeU

    Small Bowl

    From the album: LeeU 6-15 Single Fire 1

    Laguna White w/Sand and Coyote clear
  21. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    For those who have been following along with the drama of making "F3 - The Wizard of Oz" tornado container, this second version survived the bisque firing and awaits detailing with underglaze and glazing...hopefully, a single glaze firing and perhaps a single decal firing. Read more about this project and projects by other artists in the Ceramic Arts Community Forum - "Community Challenge #2".
  22. From the album: Work in Progress

    Playing around with different slip designs for my favorite from my set of vintage dinnerware.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade, all rights reserved

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