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Found 224 results

  1. So, I don't have a clue about ceramics, but I'm trying to do a DIY Sharpie mug. I took some IKEA mugs, removed the glaze using Armor Etch, wrote on my design using oil-based sharpie pens. Now I'm looking for a glaze I can put on top to seal the design. I don't have a kiln, just an oven, and because it's a mug, I need a glaze that is food-safe and heat resistant for dishwasher and microwave use. Am I just totally in over my head or does such a product exist? If not, is there any way to create a similar product that is dishwasher and microwave safe?
  2. Commercial glazes that can be purchased please. the dead thread..
  3. I just graduated from high school where my teacher would do everything with the kiln. I just got a kiln and am going to start firing my own things. It is a cress cone sitter. I have a bunch of low fire clays around but i plan on getting some potters choice glazes. will the cone 5-6 glaze would work with the low fire clays? what clays would be good for throwing and firing with the potters choice? can i bisque high fire clays at around 04? Im a bit new to firing my own pieces so sorry about all the questions.
  4. I have bought some duncan covercoat underglazes and fired some testtiles with 2 types of clear glaze over them, a matte and a glossy. I make my own glazes and used food-safe cone 6 glazes I have not yet had problems with. The colours have dissapeared and changed after firing. What is a good recipe for a cone 6 matte - and a cone 6 glossy glaze for over these underglazes? Marlies
  5. I am new at firing my own pots. I've only glaze fired a couple of times in my new Skutt kiln. I just glazed some pieces today and I'm hoping to fire tomorrow. I don't know if overnight is long enough for drying though. I left the temperature in the room at 65 degrees F. Will it be safe to fire so soon? Thanks
  6. I put a coat of glaze on a pot last weekend. This weekend I went back to finish glazing. I dipped the same pot into another glaze. The second coat cracked and peeled off in chunks. It happened on 2 pots, same glazes. On one, i lightly tapped and brushed the loose glaze with a brush, then dabbed glaze back on with the brush. - On the other, since is was more of a flat piece, I left it like that. I'm hoping it will still melt as I want it to even though it's cracked and not adhering to the first layer of glaze. I wonder if the first coat (dipped a week ago) got so dry the new glaze couldn't adhere. Other glazes adhered to the same first coat from last week though. So it might be just the two glazes don't work well together. Does anyone have advice for me? Thanks
  7. Hi all! I have a new type of project that I'm not too sure how to execute. I have a client that wants lettering on a mug and I have a few ideas on how to do it - but need some expert advice! I'm going for a knock-out kind of text, similar to what is show in my attached image. I couldn't link the image correctly, but here it is shared on my Google Drive: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9KmXACqrOVwUXJsMmN1NjVqRDg/view?usp=sharing 1. My first thought was to stamp letters into the semi-leather hard clay and carefully fill the grooves in with dark-colored slip. Bisque, then cover the text area with wax resist and finish glazing the rest of the mug. 2. Dipping the stamps in dark colored slip and stamping with color directly onto semi-leather hard clay. Bisque, then cover the text area with wax resist and finish glazing the rest of the mug. 3. My final thought was to skip dealing with the tedious slip application and just stamp the lettering into the mug, then bisque. Paint glaze onto the text area only, to fill in the grooves - then wipe off the excess. Apply a wax resist OVER the lettered section and then glaze the entire mug. I am really leaning toward the third method because it seems the most straigh-forward and easiest, but I've never applied wax resist OVER glaze and not sure how it will turn out. I wanted to see if anyone on here has ever used this method before with fine detail. Thank you so much fo your help! - Nina
  8. A problem has arisen on mugs where the glaze has a hole in it around the handles - this has only recently started happening. A friend said it looks like crawling - if so how do I stop it happening? My kiln elements are a bit worn out so I am firing at a slightly lower temperature than normal to avoid overfiring - could this be the problem? Or is it dust? If there's an obvious hole in the glaze when I apply it I brush some more over it to fill it. Can anyone help? Thanks.
  9. I'm using a technique where I apply contact paper stencils to create designs on my bisque before dipping into my cone 4-6 glaze. I've had really awesome results with this. My only issue has been that when I go to peel them off, no matter how quickly I try, chunks of glaze pull off around the edges leaving me less sharp lines. I've been using a damp sponge to wipe the glaze off of the paper and dampen the edges, but I still end up doing a lot of time consuming detail work with a paint brush. I'm toying with the idea of wiping the glaze off of the decal then leaving it in place to burn off in the firing (well ventilated, of course) I don't mind if the tiny bit of ash leaves some pattern on the unglazed bisque, but don't want it messing up glazed pieces in the kiln. Has anyone tired this or had similar experience?
  10. I have a fairly new bottle of amaco white underglaze. I haven't used it in a few weeks and when I went to get it I noticed through the bottle that the color was a grayish color. I shook it up, thinking it just needed a good shake. The gray color remained so I opened the bottle and the most awful sulfur smell came out. My entire studio smells horrible. Why did this happen? I keep all glazes inside. I've never had this happen before and I've used this same underglaze in the past. Thoughts?
  11. Hi all I've seen a beautiful piece at the IAC member exhibition in Dublin. On the tag it said "dry glaze". Can somebody tell me how to apply and fire dry glaze and where to buy it (here in Switzerland there is no dry glaze available). Thank you in advance. Greetings Evelyne
  12. I did some searching and didn't find much as far as favorite glaze recipes, so I thought I'd start this. What are your favorite glaze recipes? Include pictures OF COURSE!!!! American Shino, Cone 10 Reduction: 50 Nepheline Syenite 25 Ball Clay 25 Spodumene 0-2 Soda Ash Yellow Matte, Cone 10 Reduction: 50 Nepheline Syenite 25 Epk 25 Whiting Mackenzie Grey, Cone 10 Reduction: 50 Custer Feldspar 25 Whiting 25 EPK Kaolin For more pictures, in-depth explanations, qualities and shortcomings, and even MORE recipes, visit my website!
  13. Is there any way to salvage a glazed piece where a witness cone melted on it!
  14. I am working on a special project and would appreciate help identifying a glaze (Raku or otherwise) that matches closesly the tones found in the picture below. On the other hand, would it perhaps be easier to find a clay body that when fired matches this tone? From my own view, the piece does not seem to have been glazed. If that is the case, can anyone identify a similar clay body that will achieve these tones? I need the piece to look as though it is centuries old. Thank you!
  15. I have a considerable collection of pure earth, ochre and oxide pigments and oxides which I purchased for my encaustic medium via http://www.earthpigments.com. I would like to better understand how I can use these in the creation of stains and engobes. Do any of you do this? Might you have recipes or general rules of thumb for me? I see a lot online about "ceramic pigments" but I am pretty sure these are formulated, not pure. I'll happily text the options, but would love to hear people's experience first as these pigments are expensive and hard to get from where I now live in central Chile (by way of Boulder, Colorado). My main ceramic medium is porcelain, and I prefer to fire to cone 11/12 for translucency. However, I am concerned about burn out in the colors when using pure pigments and am happy to try cone 6 to maintain color. I will also test on terra cotta and stoneware. I am most interested in painting raw porcelain with the stains and/or engobes and doing a single firing, but I'm wide open. I am a beginner, really, with lofty aspirations. I love the work of Michelle Summer and am looking for a similar effect. I'm I right that the running in the work is only achievable with the clear glaze on top? Is she using underglaze, do you think? http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-mTkhN5hewWU/T4m5nVRXpWI/AAAAAAAAAbQ/jNHD6-jMdjw/s1600/DSCN2916.JPG I have seen this "bleeding" color under clear glaze in a lot of Japanese work lately. Am I correct that this is engobe + clear glaze? So, a couple of questions in this one. I appreciate any info you can share! Direct experience, links, anything. Warmly, Heather
  16. My name is Kristofer Hammer and I am a student of Union College in the USA, and I am applying for the Watson fellowship. This would allow me to study internationally for a year, traveling from various countries for my personal project proposal. My desire is to study Ceramics and the production of ceramics across the globe and I am hoping to not only work alongside artists, but to see how the Clay comes from the earth and into a persons hands. I was hoping that this community would be willing/able in assisting me in my dream, and might be able to provide me with any contact details of artists or art institutions in varying international countires, who may speak with me. My current countries are vast and wide but I am heavily considering Germany, Italy, France, India, China, Nigeria, Egypt, Korea, and England. I hope to hear from this amazing community and thank you for everyones time and consideration! Sincerely, Kristofer Hammer http://www.watsonfellowship.org/site/what/what.html
  17. Hello! My first post here Can I purchase All Ready Made Glaze that is for high fire cone 10 clay that is like Elaine Coleman's Celadon blues or greens?- Thank you
  18. Hello! I will be making a number of sample pieces for clay and glaze examples, but would like to make little notes on the back of them. Someone told me an underglaze decorating pencil is needed. Is there not a generic pencil that will not burn off in a kiln? $11.95 and shipping leads me to think I'll just carve notes instead. Many thanks!
  19. Hi, I found that some potters would like to use silver nitrate in their own glaze recipe, this is not common in my country, could you suggest me some ideas about the use of silver nitrate? Thanks!
  20. I was experimenting with some Hakame and made a brush from grass broom bristles which seems to be fine as far as the tool is concerned (the synthetic broom bristles might be an interesting alternative too as you could space them out and create a "comb"). The issue that I ran into is that instead of doing it with slip I am doing it with glaze. It turned out pretty interesting but I'm not getting the flow that I want which is in the second photo. Any tips on getting that type of flow? The color pallate that I"m working with is exactly what I want and using another slip I might consider eventually but I'm trying to stick with working with minimal amount of variables at this time.
  21. Hello Good potters, I've just made some stoneware pendants, finished in a dry matte glaze. Are glazes that are not food safe, such as dry matte or those marked with a 'CL' caution label (using commercial glazes) safe to use on jewelry that will be touching the skin? Many thanks--
  22. Here is my first successful ash glaze. I call it Nuka crackle. it is fired to ^6 oxidation. It is placed on thick and cracks as it dries. The top of the tile is double dipped while the bottom is single dipped. It does not drip, but has a great matte finish. The recipe is: Soda Feldspar 40 Tumbleweed ash 26.7 Whiting 13.3 EPK 13.3 Frit 3124 6.7 Total 100 I'm thinking of using it over a darker glaze so the color is seen through the cracks. Jed
  23. I am looking for a recipe for a white or light glaze. I will use it on dark clay, so I want an opaque glaze. Perhaps it should be an ash glaze. I want to burn at 1250C - cone 7 or 8. I just today got my new studio (for the first time in 15 years - hooray). Tomorrow I will order materials so a good answer is urgent - and very appreciated!
  24. I have been given everything in a home pottery studio from a deceased estate. Now that I have the kiln refurbished and running I am trying to work out what is in the buckets because the labels just have a word or two. From one bucket I've poured a very milky 'choc-mint' onto some terracotta cake plates. Because it was so pale I assumed it was a glaze and that the chocolate and greeny mint colour would come forth in firing. Also because I didn't know if it was food safe, I painted it over with a transparent glossy glaze. Surprise, surprise with the firing! Wherever I painted transparent glaze the choc-mint was now a brilliant aquamarine blue and elsewhere the 'choc-mint' was still milky. I'm not sure if the difference comes across well in these photos but in real light a difference is very evident. So are the contents of this bucket a slip? Would a slip's colour change that much under a coating of transparent glaze? Is there any way (apart from firing) to tell if what's in the other buckets are slips or glazes?
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