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Found 226 results

  1. Hi everyone! I just recently bought a used Cress FX27P electric kiln so I can start firing work at home. So I just recently started my first bisque firing yesterday at 4pm. It was more of a test fire, so I didn't put a lot of work in there, about 15 wheel thrown pieces. There were a couple pieces in there that were not fully bone dry so I set the firing speed at E, the slowest speed. I also put a pyrometric cone (04) in the sitter, 1 peep hole open, and set the thumb wheel to 1, and I set the timer to 16 hours so it can shut off at that time in case anything goes wrong. Throughout the day and night I checked periodically, and the kiln did get red hot, so the elements seemed fine to me, but I didn't take a look at the thumbwheel. So this morning I went to go check on the kiln, and it fired the full 16 hours! and the kiln sitter didn't go off, so the the kiln didn't reach cone 04 temp. Also, the thumbwheel stayed at 1! It didn't move! So I'm thinking the thumbwheel is broken or needs repair, I didn't put the cone in right, or something is wrong with the elements. And even 16 plus hours later the kiln was still showing orange to red heat signatures inside the peep hole. So I talked to my friend who has experience firing kilns, and he said to just fire the thing until the kiln sitter shuts off and set the thumbwheel to 10 max temp as soon as possible so the kiln doesn't have to reheat back to 1000 for the sake of energy efficiency. If anyone has any ideas, input, advice, or suggestions I'd greatly appreciate it! I'm hoping to bisque fire and glaze fire using this kiln in the near future, I already bought a couple pints of cone 6 glazes to test out. Thanks!
  2. Hi guys! Seeking some help on a project I’ve been working on for a while. To not get too in depth, I’ve been replicating this antique teapot, and need some advice on getting the finish/color right. I’ve struggled and struggled trying to find the right glaze to match, and then I had an epiphany that the orange is NOT a glaze but rather some sort of paint. There’s a definite texture change between the clear glazed areas and the orange. Also, the orange is kind of a satin finish. Does anyone have a clue what type of paint this would be, or what would replicate it? It sort of reminds me of the finish of vintage Pyrex bowls. This line was produced in the 1940s. I’m guessing they glazed all of the pieces clear, and then painted on some sort of coating afterwards to maybe save money. Anyway, any help would be hugely appreciated! Thanks! Jared
  3. hi everyone. i'm Sima from Iran. i'm a beginner. i learned the basics of the glazes. but in here the common kilns the max temp is 1080 C degrees and we don't use cones. i want these effects as i see in every foreign pages and i really appreciate it if anyone could help me to find these glaze recipes that i could use in this temp? and in the bracelet i want the speckles. the dark spots in the glaze. how can i achieve that? thank you. peace Sima
  4. Hi I would like to do a “ one firing “ of AB porcelain slab ( btw....so far so good with previous tips used for drying and warpage thank you ALL again ) Ive mixed black stain with same clay body And drawn a square on slab My question is could I still fire “ one firing “ with a brush on glaze just on the black square Hope this makes ( some ) sense ? kind regards nicky
  5. Any one used the above glaze. It has an addition of 10 rutile in it which seems a lot. Custer Feld 43 Gerstley bor 18 Kaolin 5 Whiting 2 Dolomite. 6 Silica. 18 Zinc oxide. 8 + Rutile 10
  6. Hello, I mostly do sculptural work but occasionally make flat wall pieces out of slabs. They are usually 10 x 10. I have had a couple of these pieces crack in two during glaze firing. I use a low fire clay with compatible glazes and fire them flat on the shelf. I have had suggestions to use alumina but was wondering if I stood them up in the kiln or if using kiln stilts would help? Thoughts? Thank you!!!
  7. Wanted to ask you guys about your experience with this defect we've been having. It's not glaze specific and I highly doubt these growths are just bubbling up from the clay during a glaze firing (but maybe). This defect does not occur only on mugs that are close to the thermocouple, but I don't want to rule out the possibility that it is thermocouple related. Ring any bells?
  8. Someone at the ceramic supply store I've been going to recently mentioned to me that it's possible to do a sort of underpainting with cobalt carbonate mixed with water. (I think...she may have said a different binder, but I'm pretty sure it was water.) I've tried researching it a little and can't seem to find anything on the internet about it or how to do it. Can you paint unfired clay with the cobalt-water mixture before you bisque it? Do you paint it on bisqueware and fire separately before glazing over top? Do you paint it on bisqueware and apply the glaze directly over the top? Would love to know if anyone has tried this and how you did it! Thanks
  9. If I could figure out how to attach the correct size photo you could see the what I’m gonna describe... Duncan Clear Satin (SN351) glaze is not running into all the incised lines after the recommended number of coats and fired to cone 06.. It looked completely covered. This has now happened a couple of times and I’m not sure what’s going wrong. The clay is Standard 528. The design was inscised then bisque fired to 06. It was then stained using Amaco velvet underglaze (V361)...allowed to dry before applying the Duncan clear glaze as per mfg. I’ve used this technique for a long time with other clay bodies and this never happens, no problems. Any idea what’s going on? Is it the clay? The glaze? My technique? The firing? I could use some help. (And how to upload the right kind and size image).
  10. Hi there, I'm new on this forum and quite new to ceramics and glazes in general so please excuse my lack of knowledge... I've been making ash glazes using this Katherine Pleydell-Bouverie nuka glaze recipe; Mixed woodash 33.0 Feldspar 33.0 Kaolin 16.5 Ball Clay 16.5 On a recent trip to China I aquired some rice straw ash and I was really excited to turn this into a glaze. From what I read rice straw ash should be very high in silica too like other (mixed) wood ashes so I used the same recipe. The results came out rather different then expected or other wood ash based glazes I made using the same recipe. It looks like the glaze didn't melt or run at all. Please see photos for your reference. It seems like there is a lack of silica and fluxed present in the glaze. I want to do some line testing by adding silica in 10% increments and another one adding flux like gersley borate but perhaps somebody here sees something I'm missing or has other ideas. The other thing that could be possible is that I misunderstood in China and I've acquired rice HULL ash instead of rice straw ash. I'm firing in an electric kiln on 1240 degrees and have gotton desirible effects with mixed wood ash glazes based on the same recipe and firing. Thank you for any suggestions or advice.
  11. Greetings! I'm a fairly novice potter who has made figurative pottery with some functionality using Amaco Low Fire White, which fires to 04. These are mostly ring dishes and candle holders. I've recently been looking to make food safe pottery such as plates, teapots, and pie plates, but have been given conflicting reports on how to make them fully food safe. I know that low fire clay is somewhat porous, but would a good quality glaze make them 100% food safe? I also have heard that pie plates and other bakeware may be prone to thermal shock if just stuck into a hot oven, and then contradicting information that well glazed, low fire pots tend to have less of this issue than say, stoneware. I'm not sure, and would love any insight! Thank you!
  12. Black Luster is my student's favorite glaze to use. I bought more of it but it arrived very chunky and not like normal glaze chunky-the chunks are hard. I put it through a blender and it broke up the chunks a little but then they reformed. I read that sometimes glazes can get chunky when it is too cold but none of the other glazes we have are doing it. ??
  13. I mixed my glazes yesterday thru 120 mesh sieve twice And noticed crystallized pieces They had settled again this morning ( 2 hours of grinding work and sieved again ) Especially 2 out of 4 had settled Obviously not as much but still rather stiff Even though I added a bit of glaze thinner yesterday( deflocculant ) Could it be that they might be contaminated ???? This has happened before to same batches Any help would be much appreciated Thank you Nicky
  14. Hi, so I am new at this and asking for help. I had fired my clay, and painted it (with regular paint, ceramics friendly) and then put a glaze over top. The glaze said it could be used over paint and that it should be clear after firing. After firing the glazed pieces, it seems that the paint has been stripped off and the glaze never went clear. Did I do something wrong? My kiln is a cone 8, bought barely used. I followed the instructions on the side and the internet: Cook on low for 1 hr., medium for 2 hrs., and (after looking it up) another hour on low. Also, is there any way I can fix the pieces? They were gifts and took me a while to make them, but I know they're likely ruined. I appreciate any advice and help.
  15. Hi there I have no idea if this is the right place for this, OR if these questions have already been answered - I searched, but couldn't find what I was looking for I wanted to know how to use Red Iron Oxide in sections of a regularly glazed piece (see attachments), such as a coffee cup with a red iron oxide section.... 1) How/what is the suggested ration for mixing up red iron oxide to be used as a glaze? 2) Do I do the red iron oxide part of the glazing first, then add the rest of the glaze? (see picture for better idea of what I am trying to explain) 3) There are also pieces that appear to be raw clay in parts of the piece, and then regular glaze? (see white and red tree photo and green coffee cup with faint tree lines) - are these types of works still covered in some sort of oxide? Or is it really just un-glazed areas of the work?
  16. I have a question, I have a stepdaughter that is starting her own ceramic studio. She's making Christmas trees. How do I prevent glaze from going in the holes? If they are glazed over how do I clear them period of tried using diamond tips dremmel, I've tried using grinding bits. But the ceramic keeps chipping or the bit wears out after one use. What speed do i set the bit to?
  17. Hello, All! I am looking for info on favorite and best clear glazes to use with slip decorations at cone 10, and favorites to use with underglaze at cone 6 on porcelain slip! any and all help is appreciated. I am in my senior year of my ceramics undergrad, so photos of results could be super beneficial because I am not 100% certain of the properties I desire as of just yet. Thank you in advance!
  18. Hello, I have recently set up my home studio to practice pottery alongside my course. I have a question about my glaze firing and wondered if anyone could help? I’ve just done my first glaze firing, I used Botz brush on glaze on my bisque fired white earthenware (bisque fired to 04) and glaze fired at 05. I’m wondering if I should of also done it on 04 as now they are out of the kiln they are pinging like a tinkling noise. The kiln was left for 24hrs before unloading. Ive read that this occurs also when the glaze doesn’t fit the clay, but the glaze is an earthenware glaze so I don’t really understand. Does anyone have any ideas on what I’m doing wrong? Thank you Emma
  19. I am having a terrible time mixing a dry glaze. I ordered a white dry satin glaze that should be fired to cone 5-6. I mixed 11oz of distilled water per pound of dry glaze (as recommended by the company that made the glaze), let sit overnight and sieved with an 80 mesh screen. Then when I was dipping pieces the glaze seemed a little too thick and was cracking as it dried, so I added water a little at a time until the cracking stopped. The specific gravity was in range and the viscosity seemed good. I let sit overnight again and the glaze is now super thick, like the consistency of yogurt. Do you know why this happened? Did I add to much water and somehow ruin the glaze? Is there a way to fix it? I contacted the maker of the glaze and they said to "just add more water" and that they did a test batch and it worked perfectly when adding the recommend amount of water. So, in my frustration I took 8oz of the glaze and added almost 8oz of water to it to get it thin enough to dip, and fired it and its crawling like crazy. What am I doing wrong here?
  20. Hi all, I'm wanting to make a low-fire matt or satin transparent glaze. Have any of you got a simple recipe? Thank you in advance.
  21. I need to find the best All-In-One clay for cone 5, great for both hand building and wheel throwing I know. That's a tall order. But I can dream. I have a pug mill and don't want 2 bodies. Problem: I have too many problems with my gas kiln for cone 06 anymore. I'm DONE. I am moving to cone 5. Criteria / Factors: I'm in Southern California I teach 180 high school students grades 9-12, all levels of art skills, so it has to take punishment Not too sandy on the wheel, not too smooth or squishy for hand building Not too dense so it is so top-heavy when trimming I'm willing to pug the new clay to soften it for throwing, if it is stiff and great for hand building, or visa versa Doesn't stain clothes or the tables, rolling pins, or make a mess everywhere Is not pure white (students can't see where they missed glazing spots when using light color glazes - painting) Good leather hard, doesn't soften up too easily when re-wetting to score things together Doesn't take every indentation to the surface of pieces, temperamentalD Centers on the wheel fairly easily, especially for teen girls with tiny hands Can take a good amount of water from beginners Pulling walls, it is strong, doesn't warp or sag easily Won't dry out too quickly in hands while hand building Doesn't bend or warp easily when removing from the wheel Not so soft that it caves when cutting and sliding off the wheel Doesn't make teens hate the class because it stains clothes or gets everywhere and of course, takes glazes well and can handle a little fluctuation in gas environments Cone 5 clays I've Tried: Laguna - Dover White: Nice clay, but pure white. easy to center, but A little soft when hand building Laguna - Plain (Buff): Nice light tan color, easy center and to rehydrate if repairing, but a bit too squishy and shows every dent Laguna - Moroccan Sand: I love this clay, doesn't leave residue - color, but a bit dense to center. It is really dark grayish brown, if they only could lighten it Laguna - Buff with Sand: Nice tan color, but WAY too sandy for students on the wheel Laguna - Greystone: Too dense and top heavy for small pieces, hard to center, but really takes a beating with water, warps when thin due to density of surrounding clay Laguna - Speckled Buff: A bit dark in color, has iron so it gets read everywhere, could stain (think girls with pure white vans) Laguna - LB-6: hmmm, can't remember, but nixed it very soon after Laguna - Sante Fe: OMG - red EVERYWHERE, like a crime scene Aardvark Clay - SBF - Too dark tan - a bit sticky for students Aardvark Clay -Arctic White: Too white Opinions???? Go!!!
  22. Hi, My understanding of gum arabic is it helps with the application of glazes when brushing them on - is that correct? My glazes to date have all been good but I find that when they dry they turn quite powdery, which compared to some of the commercial glazes, is quite significant. So before a firing I have to be really cautious about how I handle them so as to not leave spots where I've removed the glaze with my hands. Will adding gum arabic help with this? Another issue that I've found is that when brushing on the glazes in layers, some of the 'base' layers underneath are removed at the same time, so the final fired vessel looks quite patchy. This also seems to be less of an issue compared with some of the commercial glazes. Again, as far as I can tell from other forums, this seems to resolve the issue. One last thing - Does anyone know what the ratio of gum arabic is to water when mixing it with raw materials? Thanks in advance for any advice! Thanks, Carl
  23. So I’m new to getting glazing figured out. And I got really thrown off by the “whole milk consistency” rule I kept hearing about mixing glaze. And subsequently, I have seen correctly mixed glazed and I don’t think those people know what whole milk looks like.. so long story short, I got WAY too much water in my glazed and I’m trying to salvage them. I spoke with a person at the closest pottery store and they suggested I add APT-II or brushing medium to thicken them up. I added the APT and it did thicken them up some. They were at varying degrees of watery. I gave up and dumped the worst ones. I’m only working in pints right now so it wasn’t that big of a loss. But I’m still working on the rest which still aren’t quite there. I have 2 questions: 1. My brushing medium says mix 1 tsp to 1lb of dry glaze. My glaze is already mixed and not dry. I read that I should add 1-2 tsp to a gallon of warm water and let set for 24 hrs. My questions is why does it need to be a gallon? I don’t know if they are saying to make a whole gallon and just use that water when you are first mixing your glaze or add it to your mixed glaze. Can I just disolve a 1/2tsp of the medium in a little water and add it to my mixed watery glaze? 2. Do you have a better idea? Is there another way to thicken these up or should I scrap it all and start over? I have about 8 different messed up glazed. I apologive for my naïveté. The pottery store in my area is closed for another 3 days and I’d like to get this show on the road so I’m turning to you guys. You have been very helpful in the past. Thank you!
  24. I hand-mix a transparent glaze, which I've used for the last year continuously with great success. The last two times I've glaze-fired, TONS of little bumps appeared, a few of them up to a cm wide (those ones looks a little more like an air bubble in the clay. The clay is white and the glaze is clear, but the bubbles that are appearing are white (so it looks like the glaze has fused to the clay body and pulled it out into bumps/bubbles. Please see the attached photo- this is what all my pieces came out like. I thought my glaze might have been contaminated so I mixed a whole new batch but the same thing happened. The only other thing I can think of that might be different is that it's more humid in the studio because it's the middle of summer. Please help! I'm getting so delayed on my orders because I keep having to re-make everything and I'm freaking out! Should I try re-firing the pieces and doing something differently, like holding it a bit? I fire my bisque to cone 06, and the glaze to cone 6. The kiln sometimes runs a little on the hot side, but I haven't found that to cause this particular problem before. I use PSH cone 6 white stoneware #519. My glaze recipe is: 25% epk, 25% silica, 10% wollastonite, 25% frit 3134, 15% feldspar minspar. Thanks in advance!
  25. Dear everyone, I am quite new to a slip casting technique. Have made several plaster molds for casting porcelain. And had some success, but recently I have noticed that some of the greenware gets tiny pinholes and then, (because some cups doesnt have it) there are SOMETIMES also pinholes on the glaze. If i got it right, those tiny pinholes are the result of air bubbles or pieces of dust in the casting slip, right? But i wonder, do those pinholes influence the glaze? I am a bit confused, because some of the porcelain cups are not having those pinholes on the glaze and some do have. The thing is that the kiln in the studio where i used to fire my work is very old, and as a kiln technician said, it fires hire than it should and moreover fires unevenly. I wonder if this could be the reason for the pinholes on the glaze surface? Or maybe pinholes on the greenware? Or both? Do you have any ideas? Or similar experience? Thank you in advance!!
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