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Teala62

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  1. Like
    Teala62 got a reaction from Rae Reich in WEIRD NOISE ON BRENT CXC   
    A  SHOUTING  THANK YOU to Neil, Pres, Mark C, Chris, and Greybeard !!
    Thanks  to all of you great people who helped me, I was able to get that CXC.
     Now the adventure begins. I will be replacing the belt so I have to order it and learn how to install it.
    I'm off to look for information about what I may need to do to service/clean/oil the motor.  I think it might need something because when I did not use my sewing machine for 10 years I needed to clean up its moving parts and have the machine gone over.  But for $400, I am very happy. I will tackle the foot pedal first.  My first search for how to change the belt brought up a video from brent!!! YAY now I need to order my belt.  
    THANK YOU AGAIN GUYS!!!!
     
  2. Like
    Teala62 got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Pottery amateur in need of advice :)   
    Hi and welcome,
    I am not in the pottery business, but I agree completely with what Min said.  I paid for much of my college tuition in the 70's making tea sets and tea ceremony cups.  Then, I began to work as an English teacher and had no time for pottery even though I did make a kick wheel.
    Flash forward 40+years. In 2013, I took classes at a local community college and began to try to revive my throwing skills. The first day of class I thought it would be like riding a bike and my hands, arms, back, and rythym would all come just pick up where I left off in the 70's.  Even with practice, I am still not where I was 40 years ago.  It takes  many long days and hours of practice and analyzing  the work you do.  The first day we threw ten five inch cylinders and cut them in half to evaluate how well they were done.  They were to be the same size and weight.   The other experienced potters in my class are still working at improving, evaluating,  and adjusting their techniques.
    In addition I  have had 3 different teachers and each one has taught me different things in different ways. 
    This summer I decided to focus on hand building. This teacher's approach and methods are rigorous. She focuses on improving and perfecting technique.  Her requirements build good studio habits.   She has a totally different approach and perspective than the other two.  I am learning so much about hand building and  throwing that neither one of the previous teachers had even mentioned.  
    I hear here talk to the students throwing and she is so precise in her comments that I am even tempted to try to do some wheel throwing so she can help me with that.  My first class the teacher said "Center your clay and pull up your walls."  No demo, just words.   
    Min's advice is spot on.  I thought I had a pretty thorough understanding of hand building; however, this summer has taught me there's still plenty to learn and perfect.
  3. Like
    Teala62 reacted to Mark C. in Bailey 22" Mini Might II Table Roller   
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this statement is just not true.
    (My instructor said she does not recommend using a slab roller because it pulls the clay too much--she said a good rolling pin is much better.)
    any slab roller that uses two rollers to compress the clay between them is way better than just one roller (rolling pin).
    A good slab roller uses two roller and no boards. Only Brent slab rollers use boards to get different thickness. Most of the Bailey slab rollers are adjustable and use TWO rollers. I am not that familiar with the mini might but I have that larger 30 inch electric bailey and its a two roller system.Just look for a two roller system as my setup is to much for you. I'm sure bailey makes a smaller two roller slab roller.
  4. Like
    Teala62 reacted to Rex Johnson in Bailey 22" Mini Might II Table Roller   
    I had the Mini 16" roller, worked well to get me started. Way easier than breaking your back trying to roll out a biggish slab with a rolling pin, believe me.
    There is enough work in just preparing the clay for the roller, that's all I care to do by hand.
    The Mini is very handy (and priced well), but it should actually be secured to a bench so it doesn't move around when cranking the clay through.
    I just sold mine to a student this week. Glad to say I have a big table nodel 30" Bailey now...
  5. Like
    Teala62 got a reaction from Halyoosha in Pottery amateur in need of advice :)   
    Hi and welcome,
    I am not in the pottery business, but I agree completely with what Min said.  I paid for much of my college tuition in the 70's making tea sets and tea ceremony cups.  Then, I began to work as an English teacher and had no time for pottery even though I did make a kick wheel.
    Flash forward 40+years. In 2013, I took classes at a local community college and began to try to revive my throwing skills. The first day of class I thought it would be like riding a bike and my hands, arms, back, and rythym would all come just pick up where I left off in the 70's.  Even with practice, I am still not where I was 40 years ago.  It takes  many long days and hours of practice and analyzing  the work you do.  The first day we threw ten five inch cylinders and cut them in half to evaluate how well they were done.  They were to be the same size and weight.   The other experienced potters in my class are still working at improving, evaluating,  and adjusting their techniques.
    In addition I  have had 3 different teachers and each one has taught me different things in different ways. 
    This summer I decided to focus on hand building. This teacher's approach and methods are rigorous. She focuses on improving and perfecting technique.  Her requirements build good studio habits.   She has a totally different approach and perspective than the other two.  I am learning so much about hand building and  throwing that neither one of the previous teachers had even mentioned.  
    I hear here talk to the students throwing and she is so precise in her comments that I am even tempted to try to do some wheel throwing so she can help me with that.  My first class the teacher said "Center your clay and pull up your walls."  No demo, just words.   
    Min's advice is spot on.  I thought I had a pretty thorough understanding of hand building; however, this summer has taught me there's still plenty to learn and perfect.
  6. Like
    Teala62 reacted to GEP in QotW: How do you organize your work schedule?   
    This is my favorite and most important scheduling tool: a wall calendar that displays the entire year at a glance, and can be written on with a dry erase pen. I plan out about 2 months worth of days in advance, then stick to my plan as close as possible. It takes an emergency to make me ignore my plan. If I don’t stick to it, I will arrive at shows feeling underprepared, and I hate that! The shorthand you see (1a thru 1d, 2a thru 2d) refers to to-do lists that I keep in a notebook. Each to-do list produces about $1250 worth of pots. So when I apply for and get accepted into a show, before I commit to it I will make sure I have enough days to produce the necessary amount of inventory. If yes, then I will commit to the show and schedule the days of production. This way, I am always fully stocked. But I avoid overstocking myself which I consider wasted energy.
    As you can see, I give myself regular days off, usually two in a row but sometimes three. I need these days out of the studio to let my sore muscles recover. Often, one of those off days will be spent working, just not in the studio. This is when I get my computer stuff done (bookkeeping, bill paying, writing blog posts, writing email campaigns, making hang tags, photographing my work, website updates, etc.) So that means I get one day “off” but that’s enough. 

    Today 6/26 which is a day off. Tomorrow I start another round of glazing. And then I reach the end of my currently scheduled days. I have a completely unscheduled week 7/1 thru 7/7. Weird feeling! I will probably schedule those days as “video days” because I don’t need more pots for the three shows coming up in July. When I get near the end of my July shows, I will plan out all the days until my three October shows. Then follow the plan. 
  7. Like
    Teala62 reacted to oldlady in What’s on your workbench?   
    today i had things on my workbench i would be happy to let anyone see.  hope they all make it through the next steps to finished product.
    i would be happy if i could capture in the final firing that soft color of the slip.  who knows how it will look when it is finished?



  8. Like
    Teala62 got a reaction from clay lover in New Skutt wheel issues   
    Call Skutt and talk to Perry.  I was asking him about loud noises and told him that someone had been told it was normal.  I just sent him this link because I was thinking of buying a new Skutt wheel. He has not yet called me, but he has been very helpful in answering all types of questions I had about a new wheel.
     
  9. Like
    Teala62 reacted to ~howdy~ in HOW OLD IS TOO OLD FOR A WHEEL?   
    Seeking an affordable wheel I found a Brent C on Craigslist for $75.  It ran fine when I checked it out and has worked without flaws for the last year or so.  It was made in the very early days (made around 1971 according to Brent) and was lacking the bracket to hold a splash pan on later wheels.  I am completely happy with the wheel using it for hours a week.  
    I found my Skutt 1027 kiln on a government surplus auction website and purchased it for $125 but had to transport it from Michigan to Oregon myself.  I had it checked out by the Skutt factory and they replaced a couple of wires in the computer control box for only a few bucks.  After installing a new electrical circuit (and upgrading the electrical breaker box just because I wanted to) I might have around $500 total invested.   
    If you are willing to cast a wide net bargains are out there.  Government surplus is a great way to find items for your studio.  I have seen wheels sell one at a time and in multiples as well.  The auction for four Brent model C wheels selling as a single unit that closed for $300 was enough to make me weep.  Pug mills for $250, slab rollers for $100,  gas kilns for $5, you name it-it will show up somewhere.  Sometimes they require a little repair but mostly things work fine having been surplused after a change in programs at schools.  I am willing to invest a little time, travel, and repair for a good deal.
    Kim
  10. Like
    Teala62 reacted to sprig2 in Narrowed It Down To A Couple Wheels?   
    I agree with you guys on fit and comfort being important. I am not super tall at 5' 6" but I have long legs for my height.  I am going to take a day trip to a supply house next week if all goes as planned. They have some wheels there I can sit at! Three brands from what their web site says. I have a list now of things to consider while looking. Its a good starting point!
    Joseph F I checked out the Hsinchuen Lin videos, thank you, now I have two people to learn from.
     Thanks guys
  11. Like
    Teala62 reacted to No Longer Member in Narrowed It Down To A Couple Wheels?   
    Pres is spot on abut that. My wife is short (5'2") and some wheels just don't fit her due to deck width and wheel head placement therein. So far I think Pacifica has the narrowest deck and IMO, the best wheel head placement (although I can't see the sides of the pot that well with me directly over it). I know it looks a lot like a Brent but I can feel a definite difference between the two.
     
    If you can, see if you can sit at a few wheels first (even if just on craigslist ads) but be mindful of what you are sitting on as well, as that will make a huge difference in how a particular wheel feels to you as far as fit when comparing. For me it took some trial and error to figure out what works best for a stool, which in my case is an old wooden chair we've had forever.
     
    Picking out a first wheel that's "right" for you is as difficult as a beginner would-be guitarist picking out a guitar. It's hard to figure out what works for you when you don't know how to make the thing work. Just break it down into simple things.
     
    Are your legs spread too far or not enough?
     
    Do you have to reach out further or closer than you'd like to?
     
    Is the wheel head or deck  too high or too low (try different seating arrangement first to see)
     
    Are you hunched over too far or not enough?
     
    Could you stay in that position for a while?
     
    Where would your water bucket be and how easy would it be to reach it?
     
    See what you can do to fix the things that bug you about sitting at a particular wheel before writing it off. Selecting a wheel  is (hopefully) a long term commitment. Making the wrong choice will determine whether it will be long term or not. You wouldn't run out and marry someone from the first craigslist personal ad that was in your area/range, so don't do it with a wheel either. Take your time and see what's out there. I know they look all the same but they aren't; even the one's that look almost identical.
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