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Hulk

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About Hulk

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday October 13

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Los Osos, CA - a pile o' damp sand
  • Interests
    Pizza, swimming, cycling, reading, puttering ...and ceramics

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  1. Hi Kristy, Try searching this forum for "HEPA" (high efficiency particulate air). From there, something like "HEPA for ceramic studio" in Google - note the related search strings Google then offers, e.g "Pottery Studio Dust Control" ( etc. etc.), where the fourth hit lists topics from CeramicArtsDaily.org - see "Basement Studio - Dust Control" ...see also "Dust collection in studio" topic, particularly Mark's posts. My two cents, if the air intake for central heat was pulling from my studio, It'd have to fitted for HEPA, then I'd be curious to see how fast it plugs up. If central heat system was pushing to my studio, then clay dust would be pushed out to the rest of the house - that seems worser*! The ~$50 (two pack) 3M MPR 2800 furnace filter "...capture of 0.3 to 1.0 micron particles." Hmm... we run something like that in the house, on account of family members allergic to dust (actually, dust mite detritus, another topic...). My studio is in the smaller of two garages. The drill (thanks mostly to reading here) so far includes clothes and shoes that stay in the studio - if there's clay on the clothes, in the water bucket they go, and the shoes get wiped off with wet sponge; getting up clay off the floor before it dries; mopping up splashes, the wheel, bats, etc. before clay dries; vacuuming** with the p100 mask on, then thoroughly ventilating the entire area (open th' garage door); wet mopping the floor; checking the rate of dust deposition (my bike's shiny frame, for instance ...shelving, countertops, etc.) and wiping down with a Hulk sized sponge; clean rags - which I use to dry hands, bats, etc., not so much to wipe clay - any rags besmirched with clay get thrown in water, for dried clay on cloth becomes airborne dust; no sanding, scraping, etc. clay inside - all that happens out of doors, back to the wind. The rate of dust accumulation on surfaces - e.g. aforementioned gleaming bike frame, ahem - tells a tale! *me can say that, degree in English me have! **shop vac fitted with "fine dust" bag and secondary filter - it's not a HEPA by any means, however, the amount getting by the bag seems minimal. Mostly I'm vacuuming to get up the mess the parrot makes, not clay bits; the clay is on the other side of the shop.
  2. Oooh, that'd be good for the framers (house in progress next door) - they start at seben a.m.!
  3. Good question! At the local Junior College, the reclaimed clay throws ok up to a point, then turns into Thing's face which can be saved with some ribbing; for handles, it just don' behave very well - it pulls up to a point, then just separates (no "legs"?). However, reclaimed clay at home is working very well for me, not sure why - different clay, and the process a bit different as well. At home I thoroughly dry out all the ooops, trimmings and such, then re-slake; the slop is just tossed in after pouring off the clear water. Then I woosh it with the big drill motor and grout mixer. Finally, once dry enough, the mush hits the plaster bats for final drying before wedge and bag. For sure each bit of clay is wet for several weeks after the re-slake. At school, not sure what they do.
  4. "If I lived nearby, I would do the eight hour shifts for you." Me too. As for what I think/feel/do regarding limitations, I'm very lucky to be able to adjust for weak and sore thumbs (and a few other minor problems). In public settings, I can hold my breath and/or walk away when artificial fragrances loom. Unfortunately, it's not a "real thing" for many - my "doctor" (looking for a new one), my employer (former, retired early), ceramics instructor (so farr, staying upwind of the two stinkers is working; when the weather turns cold and the doors close, weelll, I'll just open the doors, or go home), etc. I'm lucky!
  5. Hulk

    Gare mini kiln

    My guess would be that kiln will last much longer firing to 06-05 than pushing to 8; it's "only" 500 degrees more, however, my understanding is that it's much more work to get that increase in temp. Even the jump from 6 to 8 is significant. Any road, you'll want to fire your clay to maturity ...that said, I'm excited for you!
  6. "Just look for the huge Green Guy? Or the people running away like Godzilla?" Pretty close, yuuup. (I'll IM you my #) Pop grew up by Little River, lil' town o' Crannell; we don't get up that way very often now, e'body gone, 'cept Mad Dog Murphy, my cousin, who's retired up thar in Salyer. I haven't been throwing very long, hence "how I do" moves around quite a bit; generally, however, water usage is trending downward. A few drops might whizz off the edge of the bat, but not much. If I was faster, perhaps I could sling more water - sluicing the whole work, washing off all the slip - but I'm not very fast, takes me more that two or three pulls to get the form in shape. I'm definitely keeping fingernails away from the bat (they don't grow back fast enough), and I'm keeping the bats clean at the base of the work - meaty edge of the thumb on plastic and particle board bats, wood knife on plaster bats.
  7. We read John Barth's short story "Lost in the Funhouse" in undergrad English (literature concentration); when/if one has seen and understood how the funhouse works, one can't very well go back to and have the first time through experience again. The concept might go somewhar near "knowledge is suffering" - suffer to get it, suffer because of it, and then suffer some more. Is it worth it? Uuuhm, o'course't!! Whal, writing as art or not art might be easier to agree on that ceramic work ...or is it? Any road, formal education/training (that isn't crap) is worth it, imo, howeber, you gonna suffer, an' one can't go back neither.
  8. Hulk

    How To Improve?

    "...much more successful with the wheel spinning clockwise…" Me too, I'm a righty, but much more comfortable and "effective" with right hand inside, left hand out, and for centering, clay coming into heel of right hand. Also, my right eye is closer to the work when raising the wall. I'm guessing there's something else that I'm not aware of... I'm with you dh, works better for me with clay moving into the fixed/anchored hand (although Tim See and others can make it work the other way...).
  9. Thanks Mark, thanks Callie! I'll move ahead with simple addition of more silica, double checking the measurements, and side by side testing...
  10. "The water softener exchanges sodium for calcium. So soft water has extra fluxing power of sodium, albeit in very small amounts." I'm curious if rather hard water, softened (hence more sodium) could/would have significant impact of COE - crazing? Water here ~11 grains/gallon, hence mg sodium added per 8 oz glass of water 11 * 1.89 = 20.79 mg sodium* per 8oz glass of water. My first ever glaze mix crazed mightily! I might have made a mistake measuring up small (400g) batch. The liner ("functional clear" from school's lab - no luck getting the formula, yet) on the test tumblers did not craze, at all. I'll add silica on the next trial, and remove a small amount to mix with my tap water to compare against RO (or distilled via evap) water. I don't want to mention the formula just yet, as all indications - the source, glazy.org analysis and chart, GlazeMaster analysis and COE, my reading and very limited experiences - are the glaze ought'o fit better. *From Pure Water Products LLC website: "...sodium you'll have added to the final product. Although this is actually a rather complicated math problem, it can be simplified to the following:
  11. "He carries a huge selection of potters there." John said about a hundred! I'll be goin' back, to get a better look at all the pots (didn't have my inside and close up glasses with). If you ever get 'roun' these parts, give me a shout.
  12. I wanted to try plaster bats as well; I'm liking them! ...some adjustments: My clay pad is on a bat, hence I can switch to non-plaster bats without ruining the pad. I also didn't like the reaction between red clay and the aluminum wheel head. To stick a bone dry plaster bat to the clay pad, looks like re-moistening the clay pad is required every time, and swipe or two with a damp (not wet) sponge on the bottom of the plaster. At each second or third bat change, I'm re-grooving and ribbing the clay pad as well. Before placing the clay on the plaster bat (I'm not slamming much o' anything, given the condition of my thumbs these days!), a wipe with a damp (not wet) sponge is working better for me; the clay still adheres like a starving tick. I'm putting the clay ball where I want it, no more, for the clay touching plaster turns to tar, arr. From there, minimal water and I'm using the wood knife to clean any skim of clay off the plaster bat, hence a sharp transition where the plaster meets the work - little or no clay under my hands. We scraped the bats level and smooth whilst the plaster was still wet, however, I'm throwing on the bottom side, which turned out very smooth from the molds (pie and cake pans from thrift stores, for the boss said "No" to any kitchen borrowing). It's a different feel, as the clay is tarry where it's touching the bat. Just above the tarry layer, seems the same to me. If starting over, perhaps I'd have gone with a system, however, the clay pad works, the concept is useful for other things, like trimming jugs, and now I'm used to it. Ha, "used to it" - I'm just starting out here, been throwing almost seven months! I'm curious, is hydrostone more absorbent that USG No. 1 Pottery plaster? Hey Mark, stopped in at Harmony Pottery yesterday, John says "Hey." He pointed out some of your work, very nice! He started that shop in '73, wow.
  13. Hulk

    Looking for Garzio Blue Ash

    Wheeeelll, I din' find Garzio Blue Ash, did find online Ceramic Monthly mags to read!
  14. Hulk

    Looking for Garzio Blue Ash

    more ( January 81 Ceramics Monthly mag) - feature article on Angelo In his work, Angelo employs such glazes as these: Volcanic Ash Matt Glaze (Cone 8-10, reduction) Volcanic Ash ................................................................... 26.9% Colemanite ....................................................................... 7.5 Magnesium Carbonate ..................................................... 7.5 Nepheline Syenite ............................................................ 19.4 Whiting............................................................................. 16.1 Kaolin ............................................................................... 17.2 Flint .................................................................................. 5.4 100 . 0 % Applied thinly, this glaze is a buff red color; applied thickly, it is yellow-green. Semigloss Transparent Glaze (Cone 8-9, reduction) Dolomite .......................................................................... 7.8% Soda Ash........................................................................... 4.3 Whiting............................................................................. 7.6 Kona F-4 Feldspar ........................................................... 47.5 Kaolin .............................................................................. 7.3 Flint .................................................................................. 25.5 100 . 0 % This glaze is good over slips and stains, particularly with heavy red iron oxide stain for rust reds. Try this search string (verbatim) "garzio" and "albany slip" in your searches - Google returns sixty hits, howeber, I hafta run!
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