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Seb

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  1. It was bisque fired to Cone06 and glazed to Cone05
  2. Hi LeeU, I used a natural sponge. Even though the structure of an artificial sponge is more regular, often larger in size and has more density - which I think is actually beneficial for absorbing the slip - my concern was the fumes. I don't have the best ventilation situation and was concerned about the impact of the burning material. On the other hand, the natural sponge has its natural beauty which cannot be replaced. Here is a picture of the result. I used white slip and white glaze as my goal was to figure out the process. I am sure once you move more towards colored slips, interesting glazes, etc. you can cause awesome aesthetic results.
  3. Hello everyone, I am wondering if anybody can give me an advice on deflocculation? I am trying to adjust the viscosity of one gallon slip "Cone 06 Casting Slip - White" from a ca 50 seconds runtime, to ca 30 seconds. I have used dispersal "Darvan 7" in small increments and I am not adding water! For some reason, the slip does not seem to change significantly. Could there be an issue that I am not aware of? About how much would I roughly need to add to a gallon to get the running time down about 20 seconds under normal circumstances? Any advice would be so much appreciated! Thanks everyone, Seb
  4. After trying out several ways, I found that first you need to make sure the slip is not too thin! Otherwise, the sponge does not pick up a necessary amount of slip. After firing the new formed sponge-clay structure will be brittle and one should be extra careful when handling the piece. Otherwise, the fine elements of the structure can be easily broken off. However, after glazing the piece, the structure became resistant and sturdy enough to be handled with much less caution. I would suggest trying this yourself as it creates very interesting and fun results!
  5. Hi CNC Carolyn, paper clay slip definitely sounds like a great way to experiment with. I haven't tried it out yet and I am not sure this would be a good thing to add when submerging the sponge in the slip since it would be too thick for the sponge, but on different applications, I could image it. Thank you! :)
  6. Hi Perkolator, I really appreciate all your comments! I just did another test using thicker slip and the result turned out much better. If the slip is too thick, just like you pointed out, details will get lost. But the density/ viscosity of slip is the initial key to the success of a project like this it seems at this point. I also assume that the additional layer of glaze will give additional strength to the piece. I haven't tested that yet but will let you know how it turned out after. Best wishes, Seb
  7. On a side note, would it also work to dip the piece in slip, let that layer dry and then dip it again in slip without firing the piece in between? Or would that cause the layers to not properly connect?
  8. Hi Douglas, thank you so much for the tip. So you would dip the piece in slip, fire it and dip it again into more slip? For some reason I was lead to believe that you cannot apply slip to a bisqued piece. However, I will gladly try this method and see what come out of it! I am happy to share the results after Seb
  9. Hi everyone! I am currently experimenting with additional material, added to casting slip such as: sand, (rice) grains, paper, etc. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with that or can reference some interesting sources or examples to study? For some reason I do not find a lot (or any) examples of people working with these types of mixed media. Any tip or idea would be helpful! Thank you and I am looking forward to the feedback. Seb
  10. Hi everyone! I am currently experimenting with additional material, added to casting slip such as: sand, (rice) grains, paper, etc. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with that or can reference some interesting sources or examples to study? For some reason I do not find a lot (or any) examples of people working with these types of mixed media. Any tip or idea would be helpful! Thank you and I am looking forward to the feedback. Seb
  11. Thank you Neil! I had tried different thicknesses before and found that the slip was either too thin -after firing the structure would easily collapse- or it was too thick and you would not recognize the foam texture anymore. Building up multiple layers, would you let the layers dry in between? Thank you again !!!
  12. Hi LeeU, Thank you for your quick reply! The technique I am aiming for is something like what Marcel Wanders does with his Spongevase. Here is a link to his work. LINK I unfortunately can only do low firing. Hope the link helps. Thank you! Seb
  13. Hi everyone, I am experimenting with sponges, submerged in slurry/ slip. I have seen a view examples that I am trying to replicate. I have done a view test using natural sponges. I do not want to use any artificial sponge due to unhealthy fumes that might occur wile firing. However, the results so far did not really satisfy me. The remaining structure of the sponge looked interesting but it was very brittle and fell apart easily. I fired it at cone 05. I am wondering if anyone has some experience on that subject and a tip what I could do differently? And do you have any recommendation for natural spongy materials that I could use, alternatively to a sponge? Thank you so much for any advice , best wishes, Seb
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