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BlackDogPottery

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  1. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from lgusten in What Is Ceramics, Is It Art?   
    Totally off topic but its funny you bring up creative masturbation. My friends and I would always joke around with what we called "artsy masturbation".  Majority of art can be self absorbed and full of ego when you get down to the core.
  2. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Mark C. in Judge my pots - 3rd batch   
    May I suggest say with handles that you just practice making them for some time before keeping any. Pull some than see how to improve on them pull some more. Put them all back in bag after wedging. No need to put them on mugs until they are better looking and this will take some practice. I have found that many do not have this disciplined approach but those that do get a better jump on pottery sooner .Just the way they are attached is a skill set that needs to be practiced.
    Its the same way with feet on pots or throwing forms whatever-try to master a process not all the processes at once. Soon you pull them (skills) all together and a nice mug is made instead of 60 ugly ones that you save d along the way.
    In school I learned this approach -but in art centers around the country etc its never taught that way.Pottery is not precious its just wet clay until you fire it.
  3. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from LeeU in Judge my pots - 3rd batch   
    I bet the market for ashtrays has fallen out as well. There's somewhat of a growing pocket (like all things) for planters. I'm sure not as big as in the 70's but people have really warmed up to purchasing handmade and fitting planters that match modern or industrial interiors. I guess it's all about knowing your audience and making it for them.
  4. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Mark C. in Judge my pots - 3rd batch   
    All things come back around. Soup Tureens are out right now.
  5. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from oly in Explanation of tin / chrome reds required :)   
    I think I've read somewhere that Dolomite in a tin glaze can also help with chrome blushing. It's noted that some dolomites make the pink color and some only lend to green.
  6. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to yappystudent in Judge my pots - 3rd batch   
    Etsy has a lot of cool ideas for houseplant pot inpsiration, you might try Pinterest also. You might try making some orchid or bonsai pots, there are avid collectors of those and they generally have the money to spend. A search for 'hanging succulent pot' brings up some out of the box designs. There is a trend for wee little hanging ceramic pods to hold air plants and small succulents suspended in a window. 
  7. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Babs in Judge my pots - 3rd batch   
    Next time. After trimming I would run my finger over the footring while it was still turning to just get the hard corner off. Less inclined to chip while handling.
  8. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Choosing a name   
    You can message me if you like, but I really don't think it is necessary. I always try to explain to people, you don't sell products by talking about the features. A lot of people think you sell products talking about the benefits, but I think this is wrong too. I believe you sell products by evoking emotion first, then talking about the benefits. Look at all the best sales companies in the world. 
    - Apple's entire brand is based on emotion. They make you feel like you are awesome for having their products, heck everything statistically about their product is completely inferior to the price they are asking, yet they charge almost 100% more for stuff. They are masters at making you feel emotionally connected and inspired by their marketing. Heck, most of their ads don't even say anything about specs or the actual product, they just pump you full of emotions and say: iPhone X.
    - Coke does this as well. All of their commercials don't say, coke tastes great, coke is the best, coke is this, what they do is show you people having a blast drinking a coke, making memories, or kissing for the first time. They invoke emotions.
    I could go on and on but you get the point. When your selling ceramics online, you don't have much to go on. It is a picture of a cup, you can't pick it up and hold it, you can't see it in the sunlight and in the dark, you can't turn it to see the angle, so what can you do?
    Well, you can say it holds x amount, is blue and is food safe... But so is every single other blue mug on Etsy.
    So you need to do something different and I went with trying to evoke a little bit of emotion in my description. I didn't even do a very good job with "crackle that feels amazing in your hand." 
    In one of the previous items that I sold it wrote something along the lines of: "Every morning I discover something new about the piece and it reminds me to approach my day with an open mind and to look for unique moments..." 
    Of course, some people don't care about this crap, but some people do, particularly people buying my type of work. Another thing I do is write something like, "The surfaces of my work remind you that you are holding a cup, that you are drinking from a cup, it becomes something you think about each time you pick it up, and it reminds you to enjoy every little moment of your morning tea or coffee."
    Again, this isn't for everyone, but I am using anything I can to get a sale, and I also really feel this way about my surfaces. It goes directly with the choosing glaze post that Min made. To me, the surface is everything, because when you reach to pick it up, if it doesn't feel like you expect it to, then you pay attention to what you're doing, and that itself is very special. It is like kissing your spouse or your son on the head, its such a natural thing we take it for granted, but sometimes it's nice to be reminded of how special a kiss is.
    Anyways, so just think about why you make your work, and put a little bit of your heart into it, particularly if your selling online,  because you're competing against the masses and you gotta be different.
     
    EDIT: wabi sabi : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi
  9. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Joseph Fireborn in Choosing a name   
    When I list things on Etsy I follow a pretty simple rule:
    Color / Size / Object / Alternate Name 
    So for a mug, I would put:
    Grey Mug - 12oz Coffee Mug - Medium Coffee Cup - Pottery Mug - Handmade
    I do the same for Yunomi:
    Black/Grey Yunomi - 6oz Tea Cup - Rustic Tea Cup
    You can then go into more detail in the description as Mea said.
    An example description: (italic's the keywords for an example of how I worked them in)
    This grey and black yunomi is handmade by me and covered with a beautiful black clay that crackles and feels amazing in your hands. The teacup holds 6oz's and is wonderful to enjoy your morning tea out of every day. The surface is different as you go around the pottery cup and you will find new things about it each time you use it.  It is durable and made to last. I hope that you enjoy this cup and find joy exploring its surfaces every day. All of my items are 100% satisfaction guaranteed! If you have any questions please use the contact button to ask. 
    After the description, I always include something like this : 
    • This item is dishwasher safe, microwave safe and food safe.
    • Measures: a little over 3 inches tall, and 3.5 inches wide at the rim.
    • Holds 10oz. 
    • Weight: 337g or .75 of a pound. 
    Of course, Etsy has places to list color and then tags to put in other things. Make sure to use all of these the best you can.
    I wouldn't worry too much about titles being fancy, just describe the object in the most general sense you can, but don't leave out the details. I don't like seeing titles like:
    "Coffee Mug"
    With descriptions like: 
    This is a coffee mug made by me, it was fired to cone 6.
    ---
    Stuff like that is practically useless, people wonder why they don't sell stuff well on Etsy with that kinda description who would. You can include things like what temp it was fired to or whatever else you want, but I have found they only care about the way it looks, how big it is, and how much it holds. 
    Lastly, I would put as many pictures as you can take. I usually do 4 sides for each pot, a top view, a bottom view, a laying sideways view and a detail shot of the best part of the pot.
    Anywho, the trick to doing all this is to make your descriptions super generic besides the first sentence or two, so you can copy and paste it and then just change 5-6 words.
  10. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Black speckles in porcelain - sand?   
    If you don't absolutely have to use sand. You can get Manganese in different mesh sizes. 20-40 mesh is similar to what I've seen in his work, plus it's still noticeable even without glaze and 60-80 mesh is a little finer. About 0.7% is all you would need for a heavy speckle but anything more than that you'll notice some bloating at ^6.  I got mine at The Ceramic Shop for $3.00 a pound which will go a really long way. 
  11. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Clay dries too fast in hands, dry skin?   
    Try rolling your coils on another slab of clay. It might seem weird but I found it to keep your clay really plastic when just adding more water and re-kneading makes it tired feeling and more likely to crack.
  12. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Mark C. in Crazy requests   
    This past few months I have had some really odd requests. Whether on the phone or e-mail.
    The most ludicrous was a call a few days ago. The conversation went as follows.
    Hello
     a guys says this-(no name)
    I broke my toilet ,a piece broke off and I lost the piece ,
     can you fix it, with another piece that you make and I can attach it somehow ?
    No I cannot do that as there are many factors like shrinkage-
    Ok goodbye.
    I never got a name or where this broken toilet was but it was the strangest of many odd request so far this year. Maybe its the piece I wrote for CM or maybe the planets re aligned weird.
     
  13. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Ceallach in Pushing Slip to Engobe   
    The studio that I am in has a standard ^10 slip recipe that they use (with it seems like ALLTHECLAYS.).  I am doing work with white slip over black clay, sgraffito/carving, and then doing a wash of temmoku which amps up the iron in the clay.   Take a look at my profile for a better idea.  

    As part of experimenting with slips, I tested that slip with varying amounts of Frit 3124 for a better finish on the slipped but unglazed areas in a line blend from 11 to 22%.  As it goes from 11 to 22% the fully fired slip gets a bit grayer, and vitrifies a little bit.  I settled on 22%, but may back that down for more white.   It vitrified as early as 15%, but YMMV.
    So 22% worked for me, but I am not glazing over it.  I had an anomaly on the last firing, and recommend testing this through to glazing with your glazes and clay. 
  14. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Chicken Scratch   
    @Joseph F  Still exploring but the vision is kind of a concrete look. The kind that has all those pebbles and aggregate. 
  15. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Rae Reich in Chicken Scratch   
    So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...
    In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 
     

  16. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Chicken Scratch   
    So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...
    In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 
     

  17. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Chicken Scratch   
    So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...
    In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 
     

  18. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    Tupperware containers of glaze and slip, vintage mustard jar packed with brushes, trays of tools for throwing/trimming. Studio isn't sectioned off for different things but everything is in reach by the wheel. 
  19. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from GEP in What’s on your workbench?   
    Tupperware containers of glaze and slip, vintage mustard jar packed with brushes, trays of tools for throwing/trimming. Studio isn't sectioned off for different things but everything is in reach by the wheel. 
  20. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Min in What’s on your workbench?   
    Tupperware containers of glaze and slip, vintage mustard jar packed with brushes, trays of tools for throwing/trimming. Studio isn't sectioned off for different things but everything is in reach by the wheel. 
  21. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from Ceallach in What Is Ceramics, Is It Art?   
    Totally off topic but its funny you bring up creative masturbation. My friends and I would always joke around with what we called "artsy masturbation".  Majority of art can be self absorbed and full of ego when you get down to the core.
  22. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Ceallach in What Is Ceramics, Is It Art?   
    Function does not negate form.  It's the argument that does not hold water.  :-D
    I took Art Theory in college and it killed me because the philosophical examination led me to the conclusion that making art was nothing more than creative masturbation.  Obviously not a productive vein for consideration, as it's also a very effective assassin of the creative impulse.  Death by crisis of meaning.

    When I was a kid, there were a few things that my dad pounded into me, one was the form vs. function or form vs. content dichotomy.   After examining that for decades, I have come to the point where I cannot ignore either one, and both are crucial. 
    Not for nothing, even art has a function....which makes everything functional work.
  23. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Ceallach in Glazing to the base without freezing to shelf?   
    Yeah,  the reason that people don't glaze all the way down is because grinding sucks, and shelves are expensive.   If you are doing any kind of volume, not grinding pots or shelves is a huge lift to productivity.  A lot of folks I know will wax the bottom and then glaze, but wax and I do not have a good working relationship.  I have started to put my pieces down on a good stiff damp sponge and give it a twist.   you wind up with just the smallest unglazed area at the bottom and it's a smoother transition from the clay to the glaze as it kind of feathers in.  

    But definitely, design the foot to get the look that you want.   I like a good foot so that I can dip a piece by holding the foot.  Then I do the sponge and get a nice clean foot.  
    The other thing is to get used to trying things.  Make samples of pieces and try the approaches.  Take good notes and then go with what feels most comfortable, attractive, and productive.   Make a bunch of small cups and try different types of feet and finishes.   It's also good practice on throwing multiples.  

    Test everything and make good notes.  One of the guys I know literally times his dips based on the specific gravity of the glaze measured by hydrometer.     
  24. Like
    BlackDogPottery reacted to Benzine in student cracking clay very quickly   
    I have seen plenty of students dry out their clay from overworking.  Especially those, who have never worked with clay,  who enjoy "playing" with it,
    As the clay is exposed to air, it loses moisture, especially as it is needed and more and more of it is exposed to the air.  Couple that with the hands pulling some of the moisture out, and it doesn't take long to dry out. 
    How warm the clay is really doesn't contribute much to how quickly it dries, unless a person is generating a couple hundred degrees of heat.  An absorbent material however, like canvas plaster, cement and dry air, will pull water out of the clay rather fast.
  25. Like
    BlackDogPottery got a reaction from LeeU in Chicken Scratch   
    So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...
    In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 
     

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