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TJR

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Everything posted by TJR

  1. The post about the artist who dumped wax resist on a kiln shelf got me thinking. What have you seen in your time either from yourself, students or colleagues that you would classify as a really dumb mistake. I know we have all done them. I was the clay tech at my former art school. A student actually took an electric skill saw[circular saw], and while cutting a board, cut the end off the table. Not through the middle, just a foot off the end. When I asked him "why", he said; "I thought it was really tough going to cut that board." I am attempting to go for humour here, as in Three Stooges. Not to humiliate anyone, so, no names please, just your own. TJR.
  2. Actually what she said was;"Your mugs are TOO BIG.'She said it about three times. She said;"You can't even see the bottom of them." I ignored her. The mugs were walking off the shelves. People requested a bigger size mug. They are one pound. A regular size, not too huge. Why do people come into my studio and feel that it is O.K. to complain, to criticize, to find fault? Why didn't she say;"Your eyes are too blue? Or your hair is too wavy?" I am not going to change my work for her. Why say anything if you can't be positive? Do you have a sales experience where the person felt it was O.K to find fault? Let's here your stories. Try to err on the positive side if possible. TJR.
  3. Buying My First Wheel

    Like others[Pres.,Mark C, I have a Brent CXC.Bought used in Seattle 35 years ago. There was a grinding sound about 2 years ago-no,not my Mother -in-law. Anyway, our shops teacher in high school replaced the bearing.[for about $20.00]. The wheel works GREAT! Unfortunately, I bought a lighter Brent to use in the interim. Can't remember the letters. The wheel has a quicker response time, lighter to move around,etc. I have often thought of have the two wheels in my shop. Taught one of my sons how to throw on it over Christmas. He picked it up way faster than me. I think I will keep one for decorating and one for trimming and throwing.If I were to buy new, I would probably buy a Whisper. Does this help, or make your decision more difficult? TJR.
  4. The anthropomorphic mug. Some part of mug creates a handle, as in you are making a mug out of a cylinder and the handle becomes the trunk of an elephant. Giraffes are also good. Snakes-too easy. TJR.
  5. Does anyone know of a film or video regarding the life of Harry Davis? He had a pottery with a water-wheel. He made beautiful functional pots. Worked in New Zealand,England and South America. Thanks, TJR. I apologize. I am a two finger typest. That one got away on me. Harry Davis. A contemorary of Michael Cardew. Tom.
  6. I agree with Mark. I once mistakenly fired some pitchers made with Cone 6 clay in a Cone 9 gas firing. Lost all the pitchers as they melted. Luckily, they were all fired on one shelf. Both clays of mine were white, so it was an easy mistake. Cost me $60.00 to replace the shelf and keep the friendship. Beware of unmarked materials. The gift bearer is not dong you any favours. They are cleaning out their studio. TJR.
  7. Touch your piece to your cheek. If it feels cool, there is moisture inside. For bisquing I fire my electric kiln on low for two hours, then all switches up to medium for one hour, then all switches on full. Bisque should take approx 8 hours. Try rolling your slabs on sticks. Your cylinder looks pretty uneven. Great decoration. Sorry for your loss. TJR.
  8. You could try 10% zircopax in the slip. I have seen recipes for this, but I don't have any personal experience. Wouldn't hurt to try it. TJR.
  9. Tyler; Make a note to not ever go to her place for dinner,esp. if she is micro-waving.Is that a verb?
  10. IMG 0496

    Karen; I am liking your images-esp. the rabbit and the ravens.Great work! Tom [TJR]
  11. I love my hammer. Get in there and smash away! It's a good idea to put them in a cardboard box and then break your pieces. Do this when no one else is around because the sound of breaking pottery is a little unnerving. Don't let anyone grab stuff out of the garbage. Smash em small enough so that they are completely unusable. I think I shall go out to the studio with my hammer right! now! p.s. It's always a good idea to cull your work before it goes through the glaze fire. That crack on the bottom / rim,or wherever is not going to get smaller.Don't waste energy on it. TJR.
  12. Our ground hog died two days before he was supposed to make his big entrance. I guess we are stuck in winter until we get a new one. TJR.
  13. Barry Brickell

    Babs; We DID ride the railway all the way to the top where that octagonal building is. Got to meet Barry and shake his hand. I had been an apprentice to Michael Cardew, so we had that to talk about. His pottery was one of the high lights of out trip. All kinds of stoneware kilns, great pots, a tea shop. He took on apprentices, but sadly I was committed to teaching a year in Australia, and we were on our way there. There were other great potteries all along the coast, but many were closed up because of the competition with China. TJR.
  14. I have hydronic heat, which is two coils of glycol [anti-freeze] which rotate through the floor. Also called in-floor radiant heat.Set the thermostat in the fall and just leave it. No blowers, no fans, just a passive heat that is always on. I live in Winnipeg, Canada, which is one of the colder parts of the country. I worked in a second floor of a warehouse for 26 years with those overhead warehouse heaters blowing dust every where. Finally built my dream studio 4 years ago. My only problem is that my space is too well insulated. I need a de-humidifier to get rid of all the moisture from making pots. TJR.
  15. Barry Brickell

    I met the man when we were traveling in N.Z.What a hair raising ride up to his studio. The track went through the middle of the pottery and he could haul clay up the hill and pots down. He had a lot of apprentices working at the pottery. What a beautiful place. What a character. He will be missed. TJR.
  16. Joeseph, Diesel; I am currently working on adding colour to my glazes as well. Not thinking an entire red glaze, just high lights. See my gallery for a chicken plate with a nice red comb. I know the inclusion stains from U.S. pigment work at cone 10 reduction, but I don't know if I want to spend the money for something that may or may not work for me.The red on the plate is a Mason stain with Gerstly applied to the unfired white glaze. There was talk in a previous post about a low-fire yellow underglaze that went to cone 10 applied on top of the glaze; Amaco intense yellow V-308, or also V-391. These came from Mark Cortnoy's assistant. Sadly for me, they are both lead based, and I am a functional dude. Let me know how far you get on your research. I will dig up the name of that Mason stain red. TJR.
  17. Fritless Clear 04 Recipe

    Hey, Patat; Do you still have the recipe for that Pam,Tim clear? I used it for a number of years. Known in Canada as Worthington clear.Pam and Tim come out of the Nova Scotia college of art, and have their own successful low-fire functional pottery business. One of the problems with a lot of low fire glazes is that they eat pinks and purples. If memory serves me correctly, this Worthington glaze did not have this problem. It was also not super shiny like a lot of the fritt glazes. I suggest you revisit this glaze. Possibly add a bit of barium carb. to stop the scumming. TJR.
  18. oldlady; I have tried the inclusion red when I was at the Archie Bray. Didn't think to try yellow at that point. My supplier doesn't stock them-only Mason stains. Will have to order direct from the manufacturer. I don't want to order a pile of stain that doesn't work in cone 10 reduction. TJR.
  19. So, you said she put the underglazes on top of the glaze? And these were low-fire underglazes? What is the brand name? I am looking for a good yellow for bird beaks at cone 10. Tried Mason stains-no good. TJR.
  20. When I was making terra cotta, we used to always put in a scoop of Barium to "prevent scumming". You can actually see this on some brick buildings. Of course this only applies if you are mixing your own clay. I guess you could wedge some into your clay body BEFORE you start working with it. TJR.
  21. Sandy; I got together with Pres at John's lecture which was great by the way. We had no trouble finding space to enjoy the lectures. Really enjoyed the memories of past greats. Sounds funny[peculiar] to say that. Quite moving. I did not know the dif. between a Chowan and a tea bowl. Great info, John. TJR. I t was the hat that tipped me off to meeting Preston. It wouldn't have worked the other way. I don't stand out in a crowd. T.
  22. Paul; If you jump on your wheel now and get throwing, you could probably pull it off. Think a week for drying, then bisquing, then glaze fire. I made a series once of "Divorce Pots"' for a Valentine sale. They were slab vases that fit together. If you split up, each of you could take one. They were done in Majolica reds. All sold. Don't ask me why. TJR.
  23. Did you know that you can actually type in; "Stoneware glaze recipes"' and choices of recipes will come up? Lots to test for this next year. Happy New year! TJR
  24. Happy New year to everyone. May we all make those huge leaps in our work this coming year! Tom.
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