Jump to content

1515art

Members
  • Content Count

    501
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About 1515art

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 02/23/1953

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Santa Clara, California
  • Interests
    I began my journey in clay in 1970 and have never regretted getting my clothes dirty ever, in addition to ceramic art i enjoy prospecting in the mountains, collecting jade and fishing on my boat.

Recent Profile Visitors

4,558 profile views
  1. 1515art

    Simple DIY sink clay trap

    Lol, if only my dirt had enough gold where that was a factor and actually the golds never supposed to get that far as the settling tanks are only for the soil/clay suspended in the water when the waters to dirty the fine gold won’t settle fast enough in the sluice and then it will be lost in the tailings.
  2. 1515art

    Simple DIY sink clay trap

    Bill, I’m sure you are right and I can adjust as needed, good thing is the way it is now when not throwing clay I can convert my clay sink into a mini clean-up gold sluice.
  3. 1515art

    Simple DIY sink clay trap

    I was amazed how well this worked when I saw a guy using it moving water between tubs, some ancient technique for watering crops or something like that . JohnnyK is right and this isn’t for everyone and if I was concerned about an accidental overflow I would drop the whole thing down into a water tight box and add a p trap at the end. I’m using it inside my studio this way for now and my clay water is diverted outside into the garden and waters the hedges so the traps not needed. The water level between the first and second tanks stays very close and the third tank is slightly lower. I think the large diameter pipe has little friction loss at this volume so the siphon action with atmospheric pressure keeps it fairly level. The tubes are 4 or 5 inches off the bottom so I think it will hold at least a gallon or two of sediment.
  4. I thought I’d share a trick I picked up for separating mud from water while running a recirculating power sluice looking for gold. The same system seems to work well for the sink drain in my studio, it works off of some simple hydraulics and siphons water from tank to tank giving the heavy particles time to settle before exiting the tanks. I used three 5gal trash bins and connected them using 2” ABS, each connector was made from one 2” U joint, two 2” elbow and two 8” long nipples. The drain is one 2” ABS adaptor and a 2” sink drain gasket and one 24” long ABS nipple, everything glued with medium ABS cement. The elbow on the bottom allows you to fill the tubes and submerse them into the tanks while maintaining the siphon in the connecting tubes. Total cost for everything from Home Depot was under $50 and build time under an hour. The system easily handles the volume of the water as it drains directly down into the first bin and when the bin is at capacity with solids it is simple to remove, empty and replace. The design allows infinite number of settling bins and any size and shape of container pretty much can be adapted to work, so I think this could be made from a variety of free parts.
  5. 1515art

    CD05EFE1-04A7-42D5-B488-70976FCCB6F3.jpeg

    I can find my tools, for now,lol.
  6. 1515art

    DE54F16E-652E-455E-99A8-BC45B0F15883.jpeg

    Thanks Gabby, now it’s time to make more.
  7. 1515art

    D5F8DC7D-9CD5-4134-AA63-B06E412F1F77.jpeg

    Clean studio for the new year.
  8. 1515art

    new work at 1515art

    a few new pieces i'm working on inspired by my friends in China. These are green and bisque ware and i'm still thinking about the glaze combinations I plan to use. these will all fire to cone 10 reduction.
  9. 1515art

    No shelves

    I can’t imagine trying to transport work just thrown on the wheel in my car and in all the years I’ve worked in clay never a studio or classroom has been without a place to accomodate some work in progress, at the very least one project at a time if space is really limited. I did belong to one studio that for a time was out of shelves to store clay bags and odd tools and any work that would fit for extended time, perhaps that’s the case and there is a misunderstanding. Like liambesaw said I’d ask whoever is in charge or another member what space is available.
  10. 1515art

    Re - glazing a fired peice.

    I’ve had good result with a refire most of the time. lots of good suggestions and another trick that will make the fresh glaze stick better is put the piece in the microwave oven for a minute then try and keep fresh fingerprints off. Helps to stop the fresh liquid glaze from crawling on application and the warm ceramic fresh from the microwave helps to get a thicker application of glaze. Another re glaze technique is chose a second layer that is a lower temperature, allowing the layers to stack instead of flowing together keeping in mind the intended use of the ceramic item. On multiple firing at lower subsequent cones puts less stress on the clay body than firing up to full vitrification repeatedly it going to depend on the desired final outcome. One more thing be patient once the wet glaze is on the pot sometimes forcing it to dry to quickly will make the new un-fired glaze crack and peel as it dries if this starts to happen put the piece in a cool shaded area to dry more slowly.
  11. Shawn, watching you throw your technique is actually pretty good a couple of small suggestions, a little downward pressure on the rim as you open helps to seal the outside of the ring to the bat and helps to maintain center, staying perfectly on center at all time is absolute key to throwing well and maximizing the available clay. Hulk is spot on, work on timing you are releasing hold on the clay a bit to fast, take some time at the end of every action to allow the clay time to completely adjust to the last move will cure much of the wobble that holds you back latter in the throwing process. keep up the good work, you are doing exceptionally well for your time on the wheel. clark
  12. 1515art

    New Potter

    Take classes, you will learn something new from every teacher you have, this book was one I found helpful many years ago when I was learning to throw, “Pottery on the Wheel” by Elisabeth S. woody I did see the book for under $5 on line and internet videos were something not available when I was a young potter. I made a throwing video back in the 1970’s it was a grant funded project I was asked to do with one of the professors, probably good for everyone I don’t think it ever made the transition to digital. good luck
  13. 1515art

    Irregular shape pot

    Hard to say exactly how, he probably uses a combination of techniques depending on the piece. If it were me and I was making only one or two carving would work (taking away), if I were making more than a couple, or if they were large l would use clay slabs in a form assembled on/in a form and do alterations. Friend of mine when I was working out of a studio in Berkley, Ca. Was building giant planters for commercial buildings these were angular pieces 3’x4’x3’ he would pull them from the wood supports and beat them with metal chains and other stuff to give them texture. I might also try using a multi part plaster press/cast mold and then hand alterations if I wanted to do large production.
  14. 1515art

    DA7737A0-4E89-430A-B45B-49043B091F44.jpeg

    Basically it means “one fish” yi taio yu and haven’t measured but I’m guessing somewhere around 16” ?
  15. It depends on how much clay I am throwing, I might just use a finger tip if only a small amount of clay is involved and on very large forms I might push down with the palm of my left hand really forcing the clay to open up. I think the one thing that remains constant and is the key point is I always open just slightly off center usually to the right and if I remain steady the hole will open just slightly larger than my finger(s) and I find it easy to stay centered with the pressure of the spinning clay at a steady pace from only one direction. The problem with opening by pushing directly down in the exact center is the spinning clay tends to push your fingers unpredictably and you can get a bit of a wobble as the pressure on your finger changes with the spinning clay. Next I’ll squeeze the clay between the fingers and thumb of my left hand while pushing down on the to of the donut with my fight hand and slowly pull towards me feeling the clay and giving it time to respond. I maintain bottom thickness with my left index finger as I open and stop pulling when I have the desired inside diameter established. Squeezing the clay at the bottom of the donut after opening will help move some of the clay up and help start your first pull.
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.