Jump to content

neilestrick

Moderators
  • Content Count

    7,397
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Managing propane kiln temperature   
    At the very least you need to have a pressure gauge on the gas line and a digital thermocouple reading the kiln temp. Inexpensive digital thermocouple setups work fine, because you're just using it to see changes in rate of climb. Use type K thermocouples. Use cones for actual heat work.
    Controlling temperature at the start of the firing can be difficult. You may need to just use a pilot burner for the first few hundred degrees.
    I'm curious about how you melted your clay. What cone is your clay rated to?
  2. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Good Kiln firebaby, fires how hot?   
    In the figurine slip casting and hobby pottery world, 'High Fire' meant cone 5. That's why you see cone 5 commercial glazes called High Fire glazes. Amaco HF series, for instance.
  3. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Roberta12 in Cracked floor on Duncan Pro 1029-2   
    Hard wired connections tend to not corrode as fast as plugs, however I've seen a lot of melted fuses on hard wired kilns, too.
    If you hard wire it, make sure the cord is long enough to be able to work in the control box. I run into a lot of kilns where I can barely open the box because the cord is short. And since it can't be unplugged, it's a real hassle. It's also nice if it's wired into a fused disconnect.
    If you do a plug, don't worry, just inspect it regularly for corrosion.
  4. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Chilly in Determining bisque cone   
    For potters, bisque is always done at low fire temps, from cone 08-03. If you go hotter, the clay will begin to vitrify and won't be porous enough to accept glaze easily.
    Most commercial slip cast bisque is made of low fire clay. You'll be bisque firing and glaze firing to cone 05/04. If you fire it up to cone 5/6, it will melt and ruin your kiln shelves and possible the kiln, too.
  5. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Rockhopper in matt sealant?   
    Polycrylic is a great product.  So is the comparable water-based product from Varethane.  But be sure to do some testing before you apply it to your finished piece. 
    The flatter the finish, the more it will tend to dull your colors a bit.  This becomes especially noticeable with multiple coats and/or over larger areas of black or other dark colors.
    I would suggest trying the satin first.  Then, if it's still too much gloss, you could switch to the matte.
  6. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Kakes in Vacuum cleaner for the clay studio, yes or no?   
    You can get HEPA filters for may of the shop-vac style vacuums. I've got a Rigid from Home Depot that I put a HEPA filter on .
  7. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in how do I fire this thing so it has glaze on all sides?   
    The commercial stilts with metal tips will bend at cone 5/6, unless your pieces are very light. With a wide flat this disc they will also increase your chances of warping.
    It sounds like the slip may be fluxing out a bit if it's sticking to the kiln wash. I'd make a slip out of one of your white bodies like the 240 and test that. It could also be that you have bad kiln wash. Commercial kiln washes are not nearly as refractory as they can be. Do a search here on the forum and you'll find info about washes that are high in alumina that shouldn't stick to your clay.
  8. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Kakes in how do I fire this thing so it has glaze on all sides?   
    The commercial stilts with metal tips will bend at cone 5/6, unless your pieces are very light. With a wide flat this disc they will also increase your chances of warping.
    It sounds like the slip may be fluxing out a bit if it's sticking to the kiln wash. I'd make a slip out of one of your white bodies like the 240 and test that. It could also be that you have bad kiln wash. Commercial kiln washes are not nearly as refractory as they can be. Do a search here on the forum and you'll find info about washes that are high in alumina that shouldn't stick to your clay.
  9. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Inherited a kiln   
    Any concrete or red brick will not hold up to high temps. I'm guessing that you plan to fire to cone 10, or at least cone 6? It could be that it was built with refractory castable, but who knows... It could all be concrete. I have a hard time believing the kiln was fired very hot before, based on what I'm seeing in the photos.
    I would not save any of the existing structure as it is currently built. The floor is not safe. Salvage the firebrick from the inner layer and use it, but everything else is trash unless you can confirm what the materials are and if they'll handle high temps. I get that you're trying to make this work, but I don't see how it can be done properly and safely without  getting more bricks, or building something considerably smaller with the bricks you have.
    I don't understand what you mea by 'mount the kiln crosswise' with a stainless beam.
     
  10. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in What type of plastic should I buy to make my own batts?   
    For heavy classroom use, nothing beats plastic. I personally prefer Medex bats. They last forever with minimal care, but in the classroom they would get torn up. People just aren't careful when they don't own the equipment.
  11. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Pregnancy And Working In The Studio?   
    Is the kiln vented? There's a lot of stuff that burns out of the clay and glazes during firing, and they need to be vented to the outdoors.
  12. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from sorhain in Where Does 3D Printing Fit?   
    I don'tI agree with that. As long as the artist is creating his/her own original designs and molds, I don't have a problem with slip cast pieces being in a show. Same with 3D printed, as long as the artists is designing his/her own work. It's no different than photography.
  13. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from sorhain in Where Does 3D Printing Fit?   
    There are others who print directly with ceramic. On Instagram check out EarlyAmericanRobotPottery, or search 3dprintedceramics.
    I tend to think of printing directly with ceramic as high speed coil building, however it's still slower than most other processes used with clay. For most potters it removes the part of working with clay that drew them to the craft in the first place- working with clay. I appreciate it as a building method, but I have no interest in pursuing it myself. I didn't become a potter so I can work with computers. I think they're every bit as hand made as the wood signs cut with a router, or digital photographs/ digital art. You still have to have a creative mind, and a good eye for design, even if the printer is doing the actual building of the piece.
  14. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Inherited a kiln   
    To use real burners, you'll have to make holes in the walls for burner ports. You'll also need to have space inside the kiln on either side of the stacking area as fireboxes where the flame comes in. You don't want the flame shooting directly onto your pots. That means the actual useable space inside the kiln will be much smaller than what you see, probably only one shelf wide. The kiln wasn't built with that in mind. I also think the flue opening is probably too small.
    Is there a damper in the chimney? With a chimney that short, and having to cut burner ports, you'll want to use power burners because you can just use 2. But you'll need to figure out how much gas you'll need, and if the current gas lines can even supply the BTU's needed for an all-hard-brick kiln.
    If the floor of the kiln is truly just one brick thick, then it's really a safety issue because the concrete below could spall (explode). The mortar in the outer layer of the walls could do the same thing.
    I would talk with the landlord and see if you can rebuild it properly.
    For what you might spend on burners, you could buy an electric kiln that you know is safe, or even an old used electric that you convert to gas.
  15. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Tehol123 in Inherited a kiln   
    To use real burners, you'll have to make holes in the walls for burner ports. You'll also need to have space inside the kiln on either side of the stacking area as fireboxes where the flame comes in. You don't want the flame shooting directly onto your pots. That means the actual useable space inside the kiln will be much smaller than what you see, probably only one shelf wide. The kiln wasn't built with that in mind. I also think the flue opening is probably too small.
    Is there a damper in the chimney? With a chimney that short, and having to cut burner ports, you'll want to use power burners because you can just use 2. But you'll need to figure out how much gas you'll need, and if the current gas lines can even supply the BTU's needed for an all-hard-brick kiln.
    If the floor of the kiln is truly just one brick thick, then it's really a safety issue because the concrete below could spall (explode). The mortar in the outer layer of the walls could do the same thing.
    I would talk with the landlord and see if you can rebuild it properly.
    For what you might spend on burners, you could buy an electric kiln that you know is safe, or even an old used electric that you convert to gas.
  16. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Benzine in Inherited a kiln   
    To use real burners, you'll have to make holes in the walls for burner ports. You'll also need to have space inside the kiln on either side of the stacking area as fireboxes where the flame comes in. You don't want the flame shooting directly onto your pots. That means the actual useable space inside the kiln will be much smaller than what you see, probably only one shelf wide. The kiln wasn't built with that in mind. I also think the flue opening is probably too small.
    Is there a damper in the chimney? With a chimney that short, and having to cut burner ports, you'll want to use power burners because you can just use 2. But you'll need to figure out how much gas you'll need, and if the current gas lines can even supply the BTU's needed for an all-hard-brick kiln.
    If the floor of the kiln is truly just one brick thick, then it's really a safety issue because the concrete below could spall (explode). The mortar in the outer layer of the walls could do the same thing.
    I would talk with the landlord and see if you can rebuild it properly.
    For what you might spend on burners, you could buy an electric kiln that you know is safe, or even an old used electric that you convert to gas.
  17. Like
    neilestrick reacted to Pres in Mishima on bisque   
    The idea behind traditional mishima,  is a technique of inlaying slip into incised(carved lines and shapes), the technique requires inlaying the slip into the carved areas and then removing the excess with scraping to leave the contrasting mishima lines showing.  In following with the technique, slip could not be used on carved areas in bisque. However, you could experiment with other colored materials, underglazes, stains, or glazes to fill the areas of ground designs in the bisque and then glaze with a transparent glaze.
     
    best,
    Pres
  18. Like
    neilestrick reacted to birdypotter in Wide firing range claybodies for functional work.   
    An update for anybody using draycott stoneware or Earthstone 5 that might find this helpful:
    I tested my original clay (draycott sw from Potclays) at 1230 and 1240 and did a full absorption test on 10 bars (boiled for 5 hours and soaked for 19) and the absorption % came back at 3.9 for 1230 and 3.5 for 1240. My glazes began to change at 1240 and 3.9 at 1230 was still too much absorption for my liking (was looking for between 1-3). To use this clay I would have had to go much higher and would have had to change glazes in the process. 
    I chose a new clay - earthstone 5 from scarva for UK potters - and the same test for absorption for 1230  came out at 2.1% and 1.2% at 1240, which is much better. 
    I also tested earthstone 10 extra smooth which has a lower vitrification range and came out at 0.3% absorption at 1230 and 0.2% at 1240....so much more vitrified at these temps than the other two. 
    So, a change of clay is in order to be able to make durable microwave safe dinnerware at 1220-1230. Hope this is of use to somebody!
  19. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Inherited a kiln   
    To use real burners, you'll have to make holes in the walls for burner ports. You'll also need to have space inside the kiln on either side of the stacking area as fireboxes where the flame comes in. You don't want the flame shooting directly onto your pots. That means the actual useable space inside the kiln will be much smaller than what you see, probably only one shelf wide. The kiln wasn't built with that in mind. I also think the flue opening is probably too small.
    Is there a damper in the chimney? With a chimney that short, and having to cut burner ports, you'll want to use power burners because you can just use 2. But you'll need to figure out how much gas you'll need, and if the current gas lines can even supply the BTU's needed for an all-hard-brick kiln.
    If the floor of the kiln is truly just one brick thick, then it's really a safety issue because the concrete below could spall (explode). The mortar in the outer layer of the walls could do the same thing.
    I would talk with the landlord and see if you can rebuild it properly.
    For what you might spend on burners, you could buy an electric kiln that you know is safe, or even an old used electric that you convert to gas.
  20. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Inherited a kiln   
    The floor appears to be only 1 brick thick, which is not thick enough. It will spall or at least calcine the concrete underneath. There are no burner ports for proper burners, or room for them. The outer layer appears to be common brick with cement mortar. That mortar will calcine and fall apart, as you can see in the upper right corner. I think whoever built it had an idea of what a kiln should be, but didn't do any actual research. I wouldn't put any effort into making this 'kiln' work. Tear it down and rebuild it properly.
  21. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Babs in Inherited a kiln   
    To use real burners, you'll have to make holes in the walls for burner ports. You'll also need to have space inside the kiln on either side of the stacking area as fireboxes where the flame comes in. You don't want the flame shooting directly onto your pots. That means the actual useable space inside the kiln will be much smaller than what you see, probably only one shelf wide. The kiln wasn't built with that in mind. I also think the flue opening is probably too small.
    Is there a damper in the chimney? With a chimney that short, and having to cut burner ports, you'll want to use power burners because you can just use 2. But you'll need to figure out how much gas you'll need, and if the current gas lines can even supply the BTU's needed for an all-hard-brick kiln.
    If the floor of the kiln is truly just one brick thick, then it's really a safety issue because the concrete below could spall (explode). The mortar in the outer layer of the walls could do the same thing.
    I would talk with the landlord and see if you can rebuild it properly.
    For what you might spend on burners, you could buy an electric kiln that you know is safe, or even an old used electric that you convert to gas.
  22. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Liam V in Making slip from clay trimmings   
    You need to be more precise in the making of the slip. HERE is a good resource. Sodium silicate deflocculates the clay, meaning it makes it more fluid without adding more water. So you have a slip that is fluid enough t o pour in and out of the mold, but is low enough in water content that it will dry quicker and shrink less in the mold. Also make sure your mold is totally dry. If it is a newly made mold, it must be dried completely before using, which could take a week or more depending on conditions.
  23. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Rae Reich in Monotyping ink or technique?   
    Seriously, though, My students who do paper transfers just use a slip trailer and underglaze or Stroke-n-Coat. I think there's just a limit to how thin a line you can get with that method. Also try different types of paper. The more absorbent the paper, the less it will run out.
  24. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from Hulk in Making slip from clay trimmings   
    You need to be more precise in the making of the slip. HERE is a good resource. Sodium silicate deflocculates the clay, meaning it makes it more fluid without adding more water. So you have a slip that is fluid enough t o pour in and out of the mold, but is low enough in water content that it will dry quicker and shrink less in the mold. Also make sure your mold is totally dry. If it is a newly made mold, it must be dried completely before using, which could take a week or more depending on conditions.
  25. Like
    neilestrick got a reaction from liambesaw in Monotyping ink or technique?   
    This slip is bananas! B-A-N-A-N-A-S!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.