Jump to content

Lemmingtherapist

Members
  • Content count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Lemmingtherapist

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    UK
  1. Rims On Handbuilt Bowls

    I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet. The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video) Hope this helps, Julia Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links. I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside. Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming. A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot. That sounds really excellent - thanks. One of the problems is that the walls of the bowl are not as even a thickness as with wheel thrown, which leads me to trying to find 'disguises' for the rim rather than a tidy edge. Your method would correct the wall thickness at the rim too. I would think it would also make a strong rim as the tool will compress the clay as you use it.
  2. Rims On Handbuilt Bowls

    I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet. The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video) Hope this helps, Julia Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links. I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside. Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming. A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.
  3. Rims On Handbuilt Bowls

    I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet. The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video) Hope this helps, Julia Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links. I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside. Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.
  4. Upgrading An Electric Kiln

    I would suggest emailing Amaco from their website. I am based in the UK and in the past emailed them a question about one of their glazes and found them very helpful and quick to respond.
  5. Rims On Handbuilt Bowls

    I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet. The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video) Hope this helps, Julia Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.
  6. I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.
×