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Gabby

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About Gabby

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    New Potter

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  1. I mailed a bowl to South Africa. By coincidence a woman in the shipping depot from which I sent it told me that mailing in October it would never get to the recipient (because there would surely be a strike and the mail would be destroyed...). I thought it was just a rant. Indeed it never got to the recipient. Six or eight months later it was returned to me with the notation that it was never picked up. I do not understand international mailing practices.
  2. Because craft is aimed at practical use, workmanship may be more important there than in art. Art typically appeals to the senses and can without particularly fine workmanship or durability or even intention. Art tends to embody an aesthetic idea or interpretation.
  3. Gabby

    Drippy Cake Plate.jpg

    What an unusual thing! It looks quite fragile. Will you use it as a cake plate?
  4. Gabby

    Milky glaze

    When I get a milky finish from my clear glaze, it is because I have applied it too heavily.
  5. I love your results here, particularly the front left.
  6. I usually use my own things at breakfast and at dinner time. I have one tall handle-less mug for tea and another for cold, only because I like to see them side by side near my computer. I have a stocky little bowl I use for dried fruit and nuts and many just like it, only glazed differently. At dinner time I strongly prefer a large bowl to a plate, and I always use my own, choosing from among four or so..
  7. Yappy, I do not think you are an upstart. I responded because my observation about who usually raises this topic across the many venues where I have seen it raised is inconsistent with your conjecture that it is elites reassuring themselves of the value of their credentials. I thought sharing my observation, indeed the sharing of different observations and experiences, is exactly what I forum like this is for. Offering an alternative observation is not, I think, disrespectful. No disrespect was intended. I am sorry your teacher is absent. Unless she had an excellent reason, it is very irresponsible. The only time I was absent in my many years of teaching was when my father died. And I am sorry that whoever handled the firing in her place mistook your wet vessel for kiln ready.
  8. I don't know if you offered this speculation is jest, but my observation is actually opposite. I think the desire to learn, in whatever area, is universal, and therefore considering how best to learn is interesting to people. Those interested in an area often ask those already competent in an area what are the best or viable possible routes to gaining competency. I have heard actually quite heated discussion of this outside of the arts, with the most strident, typically, those whose education in a subject was not classroom-based. I have heard this question discussed in the most heated way among those interested in advanced sciences (say, quantum physics) whose knowledge of those subjects comes from the internet and are disappointed that their theories are not more seriously examined by those in academia or invited to the TED stage.
  9. There are many people who worry that learning common ways of doing things, or other people's ways of doing things, will keep them from discovering uncommon ways of doing things or a unique personal style. These are often the same people who believe that small children have better judgment and instincts than people who have been exposed to a range of other people's ideas. I don't think there is any evidence that exposure to a range of ideas or techniques is stifling. More likely it is stimulating. There are others who loathe formal education because they were either bored or humiliated by the particular education they received and generalize that to all formal education. I have also encountered people who are convinced that formally educated people are less disposed to becoming life-long learners than people without formal education. I don't think there is any validity to this assumption. The question of how much it is reasonable to go into debt or how much time it is reasonable to devote is entirely legitimate. There will also be people who have an exceptional alternative resource available to them that is uncommon, someone who is willing to devote all the time it takes to teach them privately. Most people will not have this option. I have taken two ceramics classes. One was an open studio sort of thing with lots of studio access but little instruction. The other involved formal instruction but no access other than during class time to practice space or equipment. I learned much more from the second than from the first, but these experiences made me wish I had had an opportunity to take a class from a teacher over the course of a three or four month term in which I also had access to the studio to practice. At this point I am unlikely to be able to do that.
  10. I like that there is variety also! I just don't get how one is supposed to hold such a cup. I am thinking one hand on the bottom and the other using the handle in a not-weight-bearing way to tip the cup toward the mouth. (I have seen these at shops so I can't just ask the potter)
  11. I like without handles better myself, so I don't do handles. But I am not trying to sell things. Decades ago, before everyone was walking around with insulated paper cups of coffee from Starbucks, people would have associated drinking hot beverages with cups with handles. Now I can see people going either way. What I don't understand, and what is popular where I am, are cups that are neither with nor without handles but have a handle like thing with no space for fingers. I don't know what this is called, but you could think of it as a D shape but with no hole at all in the D. I don't get it.
  12. This all has potential for an exposition in comics form, like The Far Side.
  13. I'm totally a mom, but if you have allergy-induced asthma, or any respiratory issues, it is always best to check with a health professional. What works for others might not work as well for you. That said, having dry, unfired clay sitting around or handling it is one place where the issues arise. The fact that it isn't fired doesn't solve any problems. I don't think safety precautions need to be expensive for a hobbyist doing things now and then. When you handle dry clay, for a short time, either don't breathe it in or wear a mask. Don't let your hands dry with clay on them and if you do, don't rub them together. I wash my hands a lot, just as I do when I am, say, cooking. Some people wipe hands a lot on a wet rag. Wash your surfaces and tools right after use. Why not? Then you won't be dealing with dry. If there is dry clay sitting around, put a plastic bag or something over it. For example, I have two things drying in my basement now that won't be dry for days and then won't get to a kiln for days later. I will put a bag or a towel over them once they are dry.
  14. I am attempting to hand build something simple but pretty large for me, using the advice I have gathered here in the last couple of days. Usually when I have hand-built I have done things with the clay pretty wet, so this is my first attempt to attach parts at leather hard.
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