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Plover

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About Plover

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  1. I appreciate the interest that my inquiry has stimulated. And all of the feedback for experimentation. Sorry I don't have the recipe for the glaze, it was not give to us, but I know it is a shino glaze with extra soda. And the information needed to experiment with our own shinos was clear, that it is the soda in the glaze applied correctly by spraying and fired in the right environment that creates the spots. I can you tell this, We didn't wait for drying. The pots were put directly into the kiln asap. And at around 350 degree we could see the spots forming on the pots when we opened the kiln door. The only thing out of the ordinary firing schedule would be involving the manipulation of the soda at it's melting point, depending on the soda you use in your glaze, will determine the melting temp. Carbon was added to help trap the soda on the surface of the glaze. The most impressive thing was the Geil Kiln fired incredibly even top to bottom and back to front so we got spots throughout the kiln.
  2. I posted this notice, after doing research on the mysteries of Leopard Spot Shinos and how to get them.. I ended up attended this workshop in Huntington Beach, California, held at the GEIL KILNS manufacturing center and headquarters. This workshop was a bargain. In a semi-hands on experience as I did not have to load the kiln...They packed 3 days full of a variety of informational topics including, glazing, loading, firing, Tom Coleman throwing and trimming. and Paul Geil lecturing about kiln technologies. And it was a plus not to have to worry about getting something to eat for lunch, surprised... lunches were included.. Paul was an incredible guy with a wealth of knowledge, an innovator, a engineer through and through. And Tom Coleman, what can I say about Tom Coleman... He's an incredible Potter, He's an entertainer with a life time of stories to tell, he's wise with knowledge and experience, and just a down to earth guy you'd like to have a beer with. I didn't feel as if I was being sold a kiln so much as I felt I was exploring and building onto the foundation of knowledge to improve a skill set. Finishing. I highly recommmend Geil workshops to anyone wanting to explore and fine tune your finishing skills. I've attached some quick images I took during the kiln unloading. What these images don't show is how much fun we all had. What a great group of potters!
  3. Good Days, Bad Days

    If we always felt we were doing well, good, the best we could do, we would have nothing to strive for.
  4. How To Create A Finish Like This?

    I agree I believe you could acheive something simular with oxide stains. maybe try airbrushing them on for a more atmoshereic look. Could the piece in your photo be from a alternative firing techinique?... Like pit firing, or saggar firing?.
  5. In case you didn't catch this in the Education Forum... I did it. I took the 3 day firing workshop with Geil Kilns and Tom Coleman! and OMG! I'm not sure this is the only way to get leopard spot shinos but based on my research, I believe it is the easiest and these guys have dialed it in and have uncovered the mysteries on how to get these little beauties. As was earlier stated... glaze application is important, you want to make sure you get the glaze on thick enough, but there was no waiting, no drying, ...we pretty much, glazed our pots and stuck them right into the kiln and lit it up. At around 200-300 degrees we could open up the kiln and see the spots forming in front of our eyes. It was amazing. The Geil Kiln fired incredibly even top to bottom. There were some special firing techinques, discovered by Paul Geil that we followed. And not only did we have Shinos in the kiln we also had Copper Reds, Celadons, Teals and a Yanagihara white glaze that was reformulated to be a white micro crystal glaze that we all got to experiment with Teal and Vegas Red oversprays. I've attached a few images I took quickly as the kiln was being unloaded. I'd say, It was one of the best workshop experiences I have ever had and I've been to plenty. I'd recommend this workshop to anyone looking to fire their gas kiln with better results, no matter what your preference is for glazes. The biggest problem was not everyone put the glaze on thick enough. Other than that, the results were amazing! ps:to the glaze section. . I was really impressed with this new reformulated micro crystal glaze based on a Yanagihara formula. It was awesome by itself on porceclain and worked really well with other glazes as accents, changing the color of the crystals.
  6. Well, I did it. I took the 3 day firing workshop with Geil Kilns and Tom Coleman! and OMG! I'm not sure this is the only way to get leopard spot shinos but based on my research, I believe it is the easiest and these guys have dialed it in and have uncovered the mysteries on how to get these little beauties. As was earlier stated... glaze application is important, you want to make sure you get the glaze on thick enough, but there was no waiting, no drying, ...we pretty much, glazed our pots and stuck them right into the kiln and lit it up. At around 200-300 degrees we could open up the kiln and see the spots forming in front of our eyes. It was amazing. The Geil Kiln fired incredibly even top to bottom. There were some special firing techinques, discovered by Paul Geil that we followed. And not only did we have Shinos in the kiln we also had Copper Reds, Celadons, Teals and a Yanagihara white glaze that was reformulated to be a white micro crystal glaze that we all got to experiment with Teal and Vegas Red oversprays. I've attached a few images I took quickly as the kiln was being unloaded. I'd say, It was one of the best workshop experiences I have ever had and I've been to plenty. I'd recommend this workshop to anyone looking to fire their gas kiln with better results, no matter what your preference is for glazes. The biggest problem was not everyone put the glaze on thick enough. Other than that, the results were amazing!
  7. Going to the Geil Coleman 3 day firing workshop this weekend. ! ... we'll see how that goes...
  8. unfortunately the thread link you posted above is not working. I am thrilled to say, I'll be going to the Geil Coleman Workshop this weekend, to explore this process in more detail. Being able to glaze my own pieces and fire them with some of the pros to help me is just what the doctor order .:-)
  9. Thanks for the feedback, the more I learn the more I realize it starts with the glaze but the firing is as important as the glaze, I don't understand why the spot in the kiln would matter? unless it relates to reduction or temp ... it would have to relate to one of these two yes?
  10. Manipulating the Soda Ash, that's what it's all about !!! just finished a week long workshop with Tom Coleman at Pottery West in Las Vegas, NV. We all threw a ton of pots and did 2 -cone 10 Gas Reduction firings, in their 24 cu. Geil Car Kiln. What an incredible facility & staff. Had a Great Time. This workshop - glaze wise - focused more on Porcelain Slips with Chun Glazes but there was also Shino glazes there for us to experiment with. I always thought the dark line around the wax line was carbon. But I learned it is a mix of the two basically, carbon and the soda ash. I learned alot about shinos this trip and I think I might be taking that Geil / Coleman Workshop in October, to get a better understanding about the leopard spot process specifically. I appreciate all of your suggestions, I should get time to try some this summer. Will post photos if I get anything special. I hear they are getting incredible results at this workshop wish I can go in June workshop argghhhhhh patience is a virtue yes?
  11. I've been doing some research and asking around to anyone that knows about leopard spot shinos.... alot of people that have used Macolm Davis Shino say they have seen this effect with this glaze but without consistency or knowing why it happens. I noticed there is alot of Soda in the Macolm Davis Shino Glaze and I'm wondering if the soda could be causing the spots?
  12. Wow~!~ now I have a multide of things to try with my Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze. I love that glaze but have never been able to get spots with it. Not for lack of trying. Thanks so much Wyndham! You've giving me alot to think about. my search continues.
  13. Wouldn't the carbon have to attach to something in the glaze to make the spots? similar to the way crystals grow, a carbon crystal?
  14. Yeah~! it kind of looks like alternative firing techinques to me too. I've been researching how I can learn more about acheiving this look and from what I have gathered it is not only the glaze but how you fire it. I understand it can be elusive but the artist I worked with said Tom Coleman and Geil Kilns has been getting consistently incredible results and he has been doing a workshop recently on the mysteries of this process. ( I found one I posted it on the Clay events section ) I'm going to continue my research but there is not much out there I might have to take the workshop in the fall And sadly no, I did not purchase one. they were not for sale.
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