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oly

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About oly

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    Advanced Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Kent, England
  • Interests
    Walking and cycling around Kent, making things, training my Labrador, Real Ale and pork scratchings appreciator, photographing trees, extending our house, cooking chilli, eating fish 'n' chips.

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  1. Well this is partly why I am trying to get information together, because within certain limits International need not be too difficult – sure there can be size and weight constraints if one wants to keep it manageable. To give an idea, from UK to N. America, Tracked & Signed (5-7 working days) with £250 compensation for loss or damage up to 10" x 10" x15" is £23.50 (US$30) (CAD$ 39). That could take a nice 10" decorative jug or vase with plenty of protective padding. So, if one knew there was or could establish, a market abroad and work is valuable/desirable enough to justify the postage cost, it gives some parameters to work to. Anything above that size (here in UK) means other methods and can get too pricey and also tricky with insurance.
  2. Understood but the shipping costs do become a concern when trying to ship (and advertise) a mug abroad where the shipping might equal or even exceed the cost of the mug. If one can get the shipping cost to appear fair or equal to domestic shipping cost within the country your selling into, then a customer can make a judgement based on the aesthetics of the pot, unswayed by shipping costs. I guess the size of the markets makes a big difference, I'm keen to sell into North America with a population of 400 million, and so I really want my shipping costs to look as reasonable as possible. I guess selling into our UK market of 60 million may not be such a draw to American potters?
  3. Many thanks, I'm hoping potters in different countries may be interested to list the costs they have to pay to send their small items domestically and abroad. Min above got the idea. The reason for the comparative figures is to understand how customers further afield view one's delivery costs compared with what they pay to receive domestically sent packages. For example, from Min's figures, compared with those I listed, it appears it will cost twice as much to send a 6" x6" x 6" parcel from one coast of Canada to the to the other and three times as much to send it from West Canada to the UK as to send the same package from the UK to any part of Canada or the USA. That is pretty surprising, and also tells me that my postage cost to Canada will be viewed by Canadian customers as extremely reasonable, and that UK customers are likely to view a Canadian potter's postal charge as extremely high. That seems rather unfair on the Canadian potter would would like to sell their work into the UK or other countries. I'd love to hear from an Australian, NZ or SA potter with their postal costs?
  4. I'd be really interesting to see the figures for the 6" x 6" x 6" package 500g – 750g? USPS v UPS, if possible with / without the discount?
  5. That is really interesting, makes UK to USA any address Tracked & Signed (5-7 working days) with £50 compensation for loss or damage look extremely good value... £15.15 ($19.29 US) (CAD $25.70)
  6. I'd like to keep this specific, because I'm trying to draw comparisons between different countries' postage costs and it's not always easy to comprehend the complicated price lists and offerings. Specifically, I'm trying to gain an understanding of how customers in other countries may view my postal charges against their own. Perhaps this will help you do the same? So, if anyone kindly wishes to contribute, the parameters I'm setting are... a 6" x 6" x 6" card box containing a single pottery item (like a small mug), total package weight being between 500 and 750 grams. I have only included signed-for services assuming all our pottery is handmade and priceless (though if forced to put a price on it we'd probably say between 30 and 60 bucks ). Here in the UK if I take my 6" x 6" x 6" package to the local Post Office it will cost to send by Royal Mail... UK address to UK address 2nd Class (2-3 day) signed for with £50 compensation for loss or damage... £3.95 ($5.03) 1st Class (1 day) signed for with £50 compensation for loss or damage... £4.45 ($5.67) Guaranteed Next Day by 1pm with (up to) £500 compensation for loss or damage... £8.60 ($10.95) UK address to Europe (any address) Tracked & Signed (3-5 working days) with £50 compensation for loss or damage... £11.60 ($14.77) UK address to USA (any address) Tracked & Signed (5-7 working days) with £50 compensation for loss or damage... £15.15 (US$19.29) (CAD$ 25.70) • I've worked exchange rate at 8 Dec 2018... £1 = $1.27 • Note all delivery times are estimates except for the UK Guaranteed Next Day service.
  7. I've been considering to do a full time course here in the UK which is a very practical and skills-based course, it's a BA course but of course there would be students with different levels of ability. I was just thinking that (as I'd be paying for it) there might be alternative courses in other parts of the world (US, NZ, AUS, Europe?) to compare and consider. I'd really appreciate any suggestions. Another option might be some sort of internship with a pottery? The thing is, I want to be developing my own work (not wedging someone else's clay!) The main criteria, I think... 1. top, top, experienced potters/ceramicists tutors who really know their craft (including the course leader) 2. range of skilled visiting potters 3. challenging syllabus that allows the student to invent / develop their own style of work 3. chance to experience of different firing techniques 4. students would have access to their own wheel/equipment whenever needed 5. ideally a qualification at the end of it 6. any length, from one term to two years or even more 7. easy/reasonable costs to live nearby 8. other students around to give some sort of social aspect (ie not studying by oneself all the time) 9. course accepts of mature students Really appreciate any ideas/feedback
  8. Looking at recipes with tin oxide and green chrome oxide that give a raspberry red colour. Hoping someone could briefly explain how this results in red and if there's anything particular to watch out for if I experiment with this? Also, what I'm looking for is a translucent or semi-translucent, very, very pale blue that breaks reddish in oxidising kiln at cone 7/8.
  9. Yes I'm sure you're right, a combination of inexperience using plaster and the very cold damp weather – the gods were against me. Thankfully, I've got through it and know a bit more now
  10. I like this! I just holding my platters by the rims with my finger tips, which mean quite a bit of touching-in later (though it does allow for really good control of the plate through the glaze). Been thinking of making some kind of tools that would hold the rims –like spiky fingers – and that staple remover, is just the sort of thing, though I might need larger ones I think. I like the horizontal in and out method as it should give exact even coverage as every part of the bisque is in the glaze for same amount of time.
  11. This is the platter decorated I was pretty desperate to get it off the bat to get working on it!
  12. Yes you are right, I have thrown them away
  13. Yay! Stuck in a warmer place and it started to come away at last, here's some pics to show it worked
  14. I think the potter's plaster might be extra fine, I'm not sure of the difference tbh.
  15. Neil, this is what i'm wondering now, if the bat was actually dry when I started using it. The weather's a bit better now but it was very damp and cold for some time (typical England!)
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