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oly

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About oly

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Kent, England
  • Interests
    Walking and cycling around Kent, making things, training my Labrador, Real Ale and pork scratchings appreciator, photographing trees, extending our house, cooking chilli, eating fish 'n' chips.

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  1. Maths never my strong point, so a bit confused about shrinkage (I really shouldn't be) but when I threw some mugs recently I thought I'd sized them correctly wet but they ended up too big, they did not shrink enough... So, if my stoneware clay has a shrinkage rate of say 12%, if I made my pot 114mm high x 114mm wide, I'd end up with a pot approx 100mm x 100mm – is that right? Also, how much shrinkage should one expect at bisque (say 1050 degrees C) and how much between bisque and fully fired?
  2. Update - all good so far, platter is off bat, trimmed and drying with rim covered! Base is thinner than I wanted (should have used more clay) but fingers crossed it's on its way I followed Min's instructions work perfectly
  3. I've got a whisper T (design has changed a little since I got mine). It is great wheel but I primarily bought it because it is very shallow back to front and so fitted by arrow utility room/studio. It works perfectly and is extremely quiet (like virtually silent) and powerful. It has a modest amount of space for water bowls/tools. The legs on mine are adjustable height, but I still have had to pack it with wooden blocks to get it to the height I prefer (I am 6' + unlike average Japanese thrower). It is surprisingly heavy to move (a good thing mostly). The legs can be removed to turn it into a sort of bench-top wheel which I guess could useful in a teaching situation. I do know of a potter who allowed so much slip to build up regularly in the splashpan that it seeped down the drive shaft and ruined the electronics (it was mended). Like most of the Jap wheels it has silly little buttons but they work okay. The RK55, when I looked at it, did not have adjustable legs, but if like me you need to pack it up any wheel with wood or bricks then that doesn't really matter. It is lighter and easier to move and hence transport. I think it is a little bit deeper so not so good in a confined space like my studio. Yes it is belt drive but so are very many wheels (indeed before modern electronics I think most wheels used some sort of belt or pulley). I actually think this can be an advantage because it means the motor is separated from the main drive shaft. It is a quiet wheel, a little bit more noise than the Whisper but by no means a problem (even teaching I don't think it would be a problem). If I was choosing again I wouldn't hesitate to get the cute little RK55 and poss the only reason apart from space not to get it would be if you wanted to throw massive pots or needed the strongest wheel for professional use. I do find an adjustable height seat useful, to save my back. I'd also consider looking at makes Rohde and Roderveld which are both made in Europe, Germany or nearby countries I think. Keramik Kraft gave me a good deal on a kiln and very easy to deal with (they speak English etc) prob worth a look for comparing prices.
  4. Min, thanks so much this information gives me the best chance of getting this right first time which would be wonderful. I do use bat pins now but no problem, I will do as you suggest and set the bat on clay. Brilliant!
  5. I guess by the time the platter gets to the wheel it must be okay to adjust its position on the foam to get it 'perfectly' centred for trimming? The clay should be firm enough to take a little mild adjustment by lifting and moving it a bit? I'd have to lift it by its rim, perhaps with help of some foam-covered lengths of batten to spread load?
  6. Min – that is brilliant so glad now I asked! My wife has found an old flat cushion with a piece of foam that could be perfect I will build it up a little as necessary. I wonder do you trim base with it just resting on the foam/wood bat or do you also add a larger bat so rim edge is supported somewhat?
  7. Do you throw platters...? Tuesday 12 Sept I've just thrown a charger/platter/big flat bowl using about 6lb of white earthenware, total diameter 14" includes a 2" rim all around flat base prob 1" thick will be turned, removing 1lb+ of clay to give a shallow foot (prob with an inner and central foot for extra support in kiln). This will be a decorative display piece so weight does not matter, in fact in this instance the heavier the better really. It's been ribbed so nice smooth finish and I've wired through the base with a twisted cut off wire. It's sitting on the throwing bat which is marine ply, I wasn't intending to move it off that until it is leather hard+. Current atmosphere is a shaded room, cool room temperature. I don't normally make these, but I need to decorate it at leather hard stage and fire it for a gallery exhibition that will be setting up in 2 weeks' time My question: what's best way of drying this so that it doesn't crack through rushing it, but still have it ready to decorate, preferably in a week's time?
  8. That is wonderful work, thanks for posting it
  9. Then I suspect you have the same aesthetic for pottery as I do. European country pottery is pure poetry, and that's certainly what Cardew was trying to express. Similarly, French country wares can positively drip with an almost mystical life - yet their makers were just that: pot makers, who went home to a supper and thought no more about it. Look at the Verwood pottery in Dorset, particularly in the strong years when those astonishingly perfect jugs were being made. The shapes make you weep. And all this works - this alchemy - in part because of the soft-fired clay, and in part because of the limpid lead glazes. Japan is amazing in this regard. I assume since you ae in the UK that you've also been to the Victoria and Albert in London? (I just spent 3 full days there researching a few weeks ago.) best, ................john I should be going to V&A next month, but yes I have been there before, it is extraordinary and as you will know not just for ceramics. The British Museum was my last trip (before the Stoke on Trent Pottery Museum – where you could probably spend a lifetime studying). The Contemporary Craft Centre near the British Museum in Great Russell Street London which is full of astounding modern work by members of Craft Potters' Association. I did visit John Leach I suppose 3 or 4 years ago, they were getting things back together after being flooded, he very generously gave us a throwing demonstration and answered all my silly questions
  10. This bowl (or charger as it is described at the Pottery Museum) jumped out at me – the Studio Pottery Gallery at the museum is chock a bloc full of exceptional work, but of course certain pieces speak to an individual louder than others, and this one just does it for me. Makes me wonder what other countries have in terms of historic ceramics displays? After all, it isn't just Stoke-on-Trent in England that has a pottery heritage.
  11. Apologies if I've posted this in the wrong section... I've attached an image taken at the pottery museum at Stoke, UK. It is a shallow bowl by Michael Cardew CBE who died in 1983. I've read that he was known for his stoneware and slipware and wondering if anyone knows how a bowl like this might have been produced? It look like a terracotta clay, but how high would these have been fired too? Would pieces like this have been fired in a wood kiln and to what temperature? I think of terracotta as always low fired – was that always the case? I'm guessing his stoneware work would have been high fired, so how would a small pottery handle producing earthenware and stoneware – 2 separate kilns?
  12. Interestingly the author proposes it as a cone 6 recipe and suggests 3 different 4-hour cooling periods to get different crystal growth. No lithium involved though.
  13. Hi GlazeNerd I'm just looking at this again as I make preparations to experiment. One question, that Michael Bailey recipe for crystal growth... Frit 3110 75% weight Zinc Oxide 25% weight Would the Frit not contain enough Silica for crystal growth, I ask because it is listed as 69.77% SiO2? Sorry, I am now reading your recent post on crystal growth so suspect the answers are all in there!
  14. You are in search of the Holy Grail! Linda Arbuckle gave the following recipe for a 'pretend' lead glaze - it should have something of the depth of a lead glaze, and similar colour responses: Frit 3110 --------------------- 30.6 Gerstley Borate ------------ 33.0 China Clay ------------------- 26.0 Flint --------------------------- 5.0 Wollastonite ----------------- 3.0 Strontium Carbonate ------ 2.5 Bentonite -------------------- 2.0 Cone 03 - 04 You might like to try playing around with it. Being in the UK, you'll have to substitute something for the Gerstley Borate, and you'll probably want to substitute for the Wollastonite too. For each 100 grams of Wollastonite substitute 86.1 grams of Whiting and 51.7 grams of Flint, so for the 3.0 in the above recipe, use instead 2.6 Whiting and 1.5 Flint. You can substitute Calcium Borate Frit, or Colemanite, for the Gerstley Borate, and see how you go. Strontium Carbonate is available cheaply on that online bookseller named after a long-ish river. I did make a start with developing this, but got side-tracked (quelle surprise...) I have never found commercial glazes fit for (my) purpose. Give it a go! Thanks very much – I will give it a try, I have something called Gillespie Borate – sold as a Gerstley Borate substitute here in UK.
  15. I do like the idea of a lead-type of crystal clear glaze for my dog jugs. I thought clear glazes would be easy but it has actually thrown up quite a lot of problems. I've also used a premixed powder clear glaze (non-lead) and I'd say that can look a bit plastic-like, especially if it goes on too thick.
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