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muddylove

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About muddylove

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    Female
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    Nova Scotia, Canada
  1. I haven't fired it yet. I'm just finishing up building the kiln and then I still need to make pots to try it out. I'm probably a month or so from a firing. I'll post something when I get things going. I've done regular barrel firing/pit firing before with mixed results. I'm hoping the down draft on the barrel will make the results more consistent.
  2. Stephen, once the barrel is lit and has burned down a little, you put a lid on top and crack it an inch or so. That keeps the heat in and limits the oxygen so the fire doesn't burn too fast. The idea is to get a nice smouldering fire. The wire mesh between pot layers sounds like a good idea. I've never done that.
  3. Teaching Pottery To The Children.

    It depends on how big the kids are. I don't usually teach kids under 12 on the wheel. I prefer handbuilding for the little ones because they can be more creative and there isn't as much safety issues. Although the wheel is really cool for kids to try they don't often have the attention span to work on the wheel a lot. It takes quite a commitment /patience to learn for the little kids. I don't even let the big kids use needle tools. I use bamboo skewers instead because they break off if something bad happens. They are sharp enough to use as a pin tool and cheap. I would look into some of the smaller portable wheels ie. VL-Lite Whisper, RK Whisper, brent ie-x I have a few and they work well for adult beginners. You can't centre 100lbs of clay on them but for most students they are just fine. They are also cheaper. Some of the more petite adults prefer them over the full sized wheels.
  4. I am planning on just sawdust/saggar firing/garbage firing in the barrel. Basically, the pots just get tumble stacked on top of one another with combustables stuffed in and around the pots. The pots are just lit on fire and then let to burn down. I can fire just in the barrel as is but, I like the idea of adding the chimney/downdraft to increase airflow thus creating more even heat and a hotter firing. I I am using metal stove pipes as the chimney to the barrel. It's not getting too hot so I don't need a brick chimney like a wood fire kiln. I'd like to just sit two barrels side by side and have them share a chimney so that I do not have to buy more stove pipe. I'll post some pictures of the kiln when I am finished. At the moment I just have a barrel and a bunch of parts. Big Lou I'm not sure what kind of brick is appropriate for a wood fired chimney other than fire brick. I plan to build one of those eventually. It can get pretty expensive to build using all fire brick. It would be great to have a cheaper alternative. My barrel kiln will cost a lot less than 100$ by the time I'm done. It's not a big investment in money or time.
  5. That is what I was thinking. I may just need to try it and fiddle a bit.
  6. What Do You Do With Your Pottery 'seconds'?

    I give any really 'good seconds' to close friends and relatives or use them myself. Any of the bad ones get pinged off with a pellet gun for target practice or smashed with a hammer before being disposed Lately, I have been using them around my studio/gallery to make things look more artful and interesting for visitors. Some are in my fish tank in my gallery, some are in my garden as outdoor art. I use construction adhesive to glue them to boards, and mount bowls/platters outside on the wall of my studio. They look nice, and a few pinholes or glaze flaws don't seem to matter when they are part of a mural/decoration on the studio. I like the idea of a garden wall or gluing them together to make a cool sculpture. A few years back one of my friends told me he would collect up all his seconds and he would invite local groups to have a smashing party. They would 'sell' the seconds to smash. The money raised would go to charity. Everyone involved would wear safety gear of course. Some pots were dropped, thrown, hit with bowling balls etc. I'm sure there are lots of stress relieving creative ways to crush pots.
  7. I am in the process of building a down draft barrel kiln similar to the one in the alternative kilns and firing Technique books by James Watkins and Paul Wandless. I was thinking about trying to use two barrels with a shared chimney so that I could do two firings at once without the expense of having a second chimney. I planned to use a t shaped pipe to join the two barrels with a central chimney. Has anyone ever tried this? I'm wondering if there would be enough airflow using one chimney to support the two barrels. Any ideas?
  8. I am in the process of building a down draft barrel kiln similar to the one in the alternative kilns and firing Technique books by James Watkins and Paul Wandless. I was thinking about trying to use two barrels with a shared chimney so that I could do two firings at once without the expense of having a second chimney. I planned to use a t shaped pipe to join the two barrels with a central chimney. Has anyone ever tried this? I'm wondering if there would be enough airflow using one chimney to support the two barrels. Any ideas?
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