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  1. Like
    Username got a reaction from Sarah J in Wheel Reviews   
    " I do it as a wonderful hobby and am not planning a business venture."
     
    Heh. I think we all felt this way at one time. But here's how it goes:
    You start making pottery (or carving wood, or weaving tapestry, or whatever), and you find that you like it. So you make more. Soon, you have all this pottery sitting around your studio, then in the house, everywhere. Your significant other starts gently reminding you how much pottery you have. So you give some to family. You give some to friends. It magically gets replaced with more! So you give more away.
    Soon, family and friends politely decline your offer of another serving bowl or mug or garlic keeper. If you persist, they IMPOLITELY decline, or cross the street when they see you coming! So the pottery mounts up even more. You want to make more pottery (addictive? Don't get me started!) but you can't afford to add an addition to your house for your growing pottery collection. So what do you do to get rid of some pottery, buy supplies and tools to make more, and keep learning? You start to SELL pottery! Then, my friend:
    YOU ARE IN THE POTTERY BUSINESS.
     
    As far as buying a wheel goes, I remember the agony I used to go through when buying stereo or photography equipment. I used to compare prices and features for weeks, until I couldn't decide what to do. One day I decide to just STOP, and when I found something I liked, to stop looking and buy THAT item, and live with my decision. It's worked out pretty well.
    I bet you are old enough to remeber the old Ford/Chevy rivalry that went (goes?) on if you live in the US. It's the same with wheels. Brent is good. Brent sucks. Shimpo is best. Shimpo is no good. Skutt rules. Skutt is a joke. To each their own, so my simple, blunt, and circuitously-arrived-at advice is : buy a Brent C and start making things to give to your family and friends.
    To quote Tim Gunn : "Go,go,go!"
  2. Like
    Username got a reaction from Marshall5686 in Wheel Reviews   
    " I do it as a wonderful hobby and am not planning a business venture."
     
    Heh. I think we all felt this way at one time. But here's how it goes:
    You start making pottery (or carving wood, or weaving tapestry, or whatever), and you find that you like it. So you make more. Soon, you have all this pottery sitting around your studio, then in the house, everywhere. Your significant other starts gently reminding you how much pottery you have. So you give some to family. You give some to friends. It magically gets replaced with more! So you give more away.
    Soon, family and friends politely decline your offer of another serving bowl or mug or garlic keeper. If you persist, they IMPOLITELY decline, or cross the street when they see you coming! So the pottery mounts up even more. You want to make more pottery (addictive? Don't get me started!) but you can't afford to add an addition to your house for your growing pottery collection. So what do you do to get rid of some pottery, buy supplies and tools to make more, and keep learning? You start to SELL pottery! Then, my friend:
    YOU ARE IN THE POTTERY BUSINESS.
     
    As far as buying a wheel goes, I remember the agony I used to go through when buying stereo or photography equipment. I used to compare prices and features for weeks, until I couldn't decide what to do. One day I decide to just STOP, and when I found something I liked, to stop looking and buy THAT item, and live with my decision. It's worked out pretty well.
    I bet you are old enough to remeber the old Ford/Chevy rivalry that went (goes?) on if you live in the US. It's the same with wheels. Brent is good. Brent sucks. Shimpo is best. Shimpo is no good. Skutt rules. Skutt is a joke. To each their own, so my simple, blunt, and circuitously-arrived-at advice is : buy a Brent C and start making things to give to your family and friends.
    To quote Tim Gunn : "Go,go,go!"
  3. Like
    Username got a reaction from Kath K in Underglaze Under Clear Glaze   
    I use Amaco underglazes under Hesselberth and Roy "Clear Liner" glaze, and occasionally get pinholes; I have had good luck refiring them. The only thing you could do would be to try it, I bet it would work.
  4. Like
    Username reacted to Marcia Selsor in ^6 Oxidation Red   
    I recently came across a old print out from 1998 by Sue Hintz from Clayart.
    Here is a ^6 Ox. glaze tweeked by Ron Roy. Sue said she adds 5% superpax for a good white glaze but mentions it works great for reds. I tried it with 10% Deep Crimson stain which I had from the 1980s. I can't post anymore jpgs on the discussions because my folder is full.
    I posted a jpg on my gallery under the first forum discussion album. The first jpg is bailey's iron red. the second it this one. This is using 10% deep crimson Mason stain in a glaze altered by Ron Roy for Sue Hintz Version#2 ^6 OXIDATION
    Cornwall Stone 33.5
    G200 22
    Whiting 18
    Ger. Borate 10
    EPK 5.5
    Silica 11
    Bentonite 2
     
    Deep Crimson 10%
  5. Like
    Username got a reaction from       in Ceramic Studio Flooring.   
    I'm gonna do this to my "garagio" soon :
     
    http://ucoatit.com/pgs/main.htm
     
    I have a three foot wide squeegee I bought at the home store. I just hose the floor and squeegee it clean. After I epoxy it, it will be even better.
    I'm sure that is the wrong way to do it, but that's what I do.
  6. Like
    Username reacted to Username in Chopped Nylon Fiber?   
    Thanks, Marcia.
    Boy, when they say a little goes a long way, they aren't kidding. What is that, like a half an ounce for 200 pounds of clay?
    I am throwing with some paper clay, and it has the weirdest behavior, it gets this strange rubbery feel to it, and starts to twist and just be "weird." It might be due to the paper fibers helping to wick moisture out of it, I don't know; an advantage is that the pieces seem to dry faster if they do make it to the "piece" stage.
    Anyway, I thought the fiber might be an interesting alternative to the paper, it will be fun to try. Always something to fool around with in ceramics, isn't there?
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